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Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Saturday, February 16, 2008, 10:16pm
Looking to put together a list of PROP Taster qualities/propensities.

Tasters are more prone to low thyroid. One study has found that non-smokers and those not habituated to coffee or tea have a statistical higher percentage of tasters than the general population. Tasters develop more rapidly at puberty


Super tasters avoid bitter vegetables making them more prone to  certain cancers.Have a higher ratio of muscle to fat and have fewer weight problems and this is often why they are hunters or explorers. Also they tend to develop more rapidly at puberty then non tasters. (added by mikeo)



Non tasters
suffer from low thyroid..underactivity of the thyroid (corrected by mikeo)
Hopefully I got most of this right. If it needs to be corrected let me know. Please add to it what you know, thanks.
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, February 17, 2008, 8:04pm; Reply: 1
I am a super Taster that has a difficult time giving up nicotine or caffeine.  Iím chewing the gum now and since stopping cigarettes, un-pleasant tastes are even worse.  I am becoming as fussy in my tastes now as I was when I was a child.  
Posted by: mikeo, Monday, February 18, 2008, 12:58am; Reply: 2
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Looking to put together a list of PROP Taster qualities/propensities.

Tasters are more prone to low thyroid. One study has found that non-smokers and those not habituated to coffee or tea have a statistical higher percentage of tasters than the general population. Tasters develop more rapidly at puberty


Super tasters avoid bitter vegetables making them more prone to  certain cancers.


Non tasters
more prone to toxic goiters and over activity of the thyroid gland.
Hopefully I got most of this right. If it needs to be corrected let me know. Please add to it what you know, thanks.


non tasters suffer from low thyroid..underactivity of the thyroid

Super tasters have a higher ration of muscle to fat and have fewer weight problems and this is often why they are hunters or explorers. Also they tend to develop more rapidly at puberty then non tasters

Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Monday, February 18, 2008, 1:08am; Reply: 3
http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/PROP_and_PTC_Taster_Polymorphisms

Thyroid disease

Phenylthiocarbamide is a thyroid inhibitor, and knowledge of this led Professors Harry Harris and H. Kalmus, and Dr W. R. Trotter, and later Dr F. D. Kitchin and his colleagues, to look for an association between tasting and thyroid diseases.

They and others have shown that there is indeed such as association, for persons with ordinary nodular non-toxic goiters include an excess of non-tasters while those with toxic goiters, and over activity of the thyroid gland, include an excess of tasters. There is some evidence that even in persons who are clinically normal there is a higher frequency of tasters among those with higher thyroid activity, and that tasters tend to develop more rapidly at puberty than non-tasters.

In this system we have a particularly complete picture of the environmental factors involved. As we have seen, the thyroid hormone molecule contains iodine, so that for normal thyroid activity, a certain level of iodine is needed in the diet. Such small quantities of iodine (normally occurring as iodide), are tasteless to all individuals. It is moreover known that unduly high levels of iodine can produce thyrotoxicosis. On the other hand there are often present in the diet, especially in cabbages, thiocarbamide derivatives which are thyroid inhibitors, and which PTC tasters taste as bitter. We may suppose therefore that tasters, but not non-tasters, will limit their intake of such substances, with tasters more liable to thyroid over activity and less to under activity than non-tasters. Since both under activity and over activity can affect fertility and can indeed be fatal, we can envisage a delicately balanced polymorphism of the two allelic: genes, based on the levels of iodine and of thyroid inhibitors in the diet, such that if iodine is deficient or inhibitors in excess tasters will be favored selectively, while if there is an excess of iodine, or a lack of inhibtors, non-tasters will be favor
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Monday, February 18, 2008, 1:54am; Reply: 4
I am a super taster and can barely get down kale, broccli, swiss chard and the like.

so i cook it in ghee and put a little agave syrup over it.  Plus i eat it with applegate sausages which help me chew it and get it down!!  

so i'm working with getting these super benies into my system.

still haven't figured out how to eat asparagus!  yuck!  I will try baking it soon like someone posted when my oven is fixed.
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, February 18, 2008, 2:12am; Reply: 5
Quoted from 1323
I am a super taster and can barely get down kale, broccli, swiss chard and the like.

so i cook it in ghee and put a little agave syrup over it.  Plus i eat it with applegate sausages which help me chew it and get it down!!  

so i'm working with getting these super benies into my system.

still haven't figured out how to eat asparagus!  yuck!  I will try baking it soon like someone posted when my oven is fixed.


Asparagus:

Season with any spice you like, and roast it in a pan at 375-400 for about 25 minutes drizzled with olive oil & ghee. (or any approved oil of your choice)  All vegetables get sweeter after being roasted. You can do this in a toaster oven as well.  Works in a frying pan but brown the
asparagus slightly first in oil, then put a lid on the pan and lower the temp to "low" until it's cooked.

You can puree it after it's roasted and add it to a soup.  Not sure of what you are allowed to use as a stock base, but it could be vegetable, chicken, beef or seafood.  If I don't like to
eat a particular vegetable I always find a way to "lose" it in a soup.

Posted by: Gumby, Monday, February 18, 2008, 5:23am; Reply: 6
I'm a super taster and I LOVE most all veggies.  Except brussel sprouts.  Those take work to get down.  That is as an adult though.  I do recall as a kid I did a lot of the "hold your breath, chew fast, swallow, and drink" routine to get down a lot of the stronger tasting veggies.  My mother was tenacious about us all getting some into our bellies lol!
Posted by: RedLilac, Tuesday, February 19, 2008, 12:56am; Reply: 7
I have a hard time trying to eat 4-5 servings of live foods daily.  My son is better than me, but I know Iíve been a bad influence in this area.  
Posted by: Olerica, Tuesday, February 19, 2008, 5:16pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from RedLilac
I am a super Taster that has a difficult time giving up nicotine or caffeine.  Iím chewing the gum now and since stopping cigarettes, un-pleasant tastes are even worse.  I am becoming as fussy in my tastes now as I was when I was a child.  


I have heard that nicotine, or rather cigarettes have a supressing effect on taste and the theory was that that nicotine/tar clogged up the olfactory sense.... I guess that makes sense that you are now 'plagued' with super tasting!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, February 19, 2008, 6:55pm; Reply: 9
I've been fascinated with this whole taster thing for years now, and I can't wait to take the test!!!  I am almost certain I'm a non-taster, as I adore sour, bitter tastes WAY more than, as Winnie the Pooh would say, "your average bear".  Things like quinine, crab apples, raw lemon and lime, kale, baker's (unsweetened) chocolate, kale, broccoli, bitter beers (although I haven't drank alcohol in years--except for ritually during the occasional Passover Seder), etc. are right up my alley.  It was especially pronounced when I was a child because I could never understand or relate to the fact that all the other kids loved sweets so much, as most kids do.  Even the candy I liked was sour:  sour balls, Jolly Ranchers, etc., and I would choose kale over chocolate cake any day.

I'm convinced I'm a non-taster, and the low-thyroid thing fits, as I'm convinced I have that, too (although blood work of a year or two ago didn't seem to indicate a prob, as the primary care doctor never said anything to me, and they never miss an opportunity to try to push a drug on ya).

I'm sure I'm a non-taster.  Non-secretor, non-taster:  I'm a non2!!!

Just give me my tonic/quinine water* and half a lime to suck on, and I'm a happy camper!

;D

* edited to add:  I'm still waiting for some company to come out with a gourmet tonic water, sweetened with something like honey or agave and made with strong, intense quinine.  The only kind I've found that doesn't use corn syrup is Whole Food's 365 brand, which is nice, but way too sweet (too much sugar) and NOT enough quinine.  Still, on the rare occasions that I drive the hour to Whole Foods, with the last time being about three years ago, I head straight for the tonic water.  I know sugar is an avoid for my type, but I do so miss the quinine, that I have to partake, once every few years, whether I need it or not *lol*!  There are tons of gourmet sodas in health food stores, but no gourmet "mixers", like tonic water.  WHY?  Anyway...
Posted by: 2478 (Guest), Friday, March 14, 2008, 4:07pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
I adore sour, bitter tastes WAY more than, as Winnie the Pooh would say, "your average bear".  


PT, I think it was actually Yogi Bear who said that. Is that his name? The bear who lives in the park and is always stealing picnic baskets.   :) One of my favorite sayings too!
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, March 14, 2008, 5:45pm; Reply: 11
INTERESTING ARTICLE FROM PROP TASTER RESEARCHER.

Beverly J. Tepper, N'82, N'86, a food science professor at Rutgers University, has been studying taste sensitivity for almost two decades. As an academic who often works closely with the food industry, she is combining food sensory science with nutrition science and psychology to better understand the links between taste, diet and health.

A cornerstone of her work is a compound called 6-n-propylthiouracil, or PROP, a chemical that tastes incredibly bitter to some people, but strikes other people as tasteless. PROP sensitivity had been known as a genetic trait since it was discovered in the 1930s. Statistically, about 25 percent of Caucasians are non-tasters, 50 percent are medium tasters, and 25 percent are particularly sensitive "super-tasters."

Tepper thought that the PROP test could tell her more than how well people could tolerate bitterness. Subsequent research has pointed to a host of taste tendencies that separate tasters from non-tasters.

"We recognized that PROP tasters not only taste the bitterness of PROP and the bitterness of other compounds more, but they perceive sweetness more; they perceive the textural aspects of dairy products more; they perceive hotnessólike chili pepperómore," Tepper said. "It's a whole range of sensory characteristics that they seem to be more sensitive to."

Tepper, however, is looking for a connection that could have larger public health implications: How does PROP taster status affect weight?

Two years ago, Tepper found that women in their 40s who were super-tasters were 20 percent thinner than non-tasters. The super-tasters appeared to eat less overall, be it bitter vegetables or fatty foods.

But there are plenty of exceptions to these rules. Tepper has found one significant factor is food adventurousness, or a willingness to try unfamiliar foods. Another trump card is a person's ability to fight food urges, called "restrained eating." People's self-control, particularly if they are concerned about nutrition or their weight, seems to override taster status, so that statistically, it has no effect on body-mass index.

Tepper, who grew up in Boston and studied biology at Northeastern University, was a member of the first nutrition school class at Tufts. After graduating with her Ph.D. in 1986, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Philadelphia-based Monell Chemical Senses Center, a research institute focused on taste and smell research. Her interest in sensory evaluation was born. When a position came up at Rutgers for a sensory scientist in 1989, she took it.

As director of Rutgers' Sensory Evaluation Laboratory, Tepper often collaborates with food companies. "When I work with industry, usually there is something applied in it that they are interested in and something basic research-oriented that I'm interested in. It's really a marriage of the two."

Tepper and other PROP researchers are looking at several ways that this one genetic proclivity may affect public health. At least one study has found that heavy smokers are significantly more likely to be non-tasters than tasters, who appear more sensitive to the irritation of smoke and the bitterness of nicotine. Similarly, tasters perceive more bitterness and irritation from ethyl alcohol, and research has found that tasters consume fewer alcoholic beverages per year than non-tasters. Tepper stresses that more work needs to be done in both areas, and that if there is a PROP connection, it would only be a risk factor, not a genetic mandate.

In the future, Tepper believes PROP research will be especially useful in the fight against obesity. Although there have been hundreds of studies looking at PROP status over the decades, only recently has it been recognized for its potential influences on eating behavior and body weight.
Posted by: podiecat, Saturday, March 15, 2008, 10:55am; Reply: 12

Hi, I'm a supertaster who has low thyroid. I also have found as I age, I'm finally loving certain bitter vegetables such as radicchio and others that I could never stand before. I generally love broccoli and have had it almost every day for years, but the taste changes in individual plants when under stress - I can tell if cabbage worms have been on the certain plant just by the taste of the broccoli (not the worms- LOL). I can't tolerate it when I get that taste. I love Chinese cabbage and purple cabbage (not supposed to have it now) but can't stand plain green cabbage - that is too bitter for me.

I miss vinegrettes and pickles soooo much! I do love lemon, which usually helps the longing for pickles, but not all the time...
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, March 15, 2008, 5:27pm; Reply: 13
it s good to know so many facts about your taste buds! :)
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, March 15, 2008, 5:54pm; Reply: 14
"We recognized that PROP tasters not only taste the bitterness of PROP and the bitterness of other compounds more, but they perceive sweetness more; they perceive the textural aspects of dairy products more; they perceive hotnessólike chili pepperómore," Tepper said. "It's a whole range of sensory characteristics that they seem to be more sensitive to."

That matches me.   Iím the one who thinks some foods are too sweet, too hot or too spicy.  I love dairy products.
Posted by: Novelia, Sunday, March 16, 2008, 4:00am; Reply: 15
Quoted from podiecat

I also have found as I age, I'm finally loving certain bitter vegetables such as radicchio and others that I could never stand before. I generally love broccoli and have had it almost every day for years, but the taste changes in individual plants when under stress - I can tell if cabbage worms have been on the certain plant just by the taste of the broccoli (not the worms- LOL). I can't tolerate it when I get that taste.  



Oh, I can relate! It's still hard for me to feel certain if I'm a taster or supertaster because until perhaps 3 years ago I might have spat the PROP strip out in disgust, fearing I was being poisioned! For whatever reason in recent times I've tolerated bitter things more by quite a bit, but wow is that a new thing for me.  Ewww, yes, I know the taste of broccoli that has been 'touched' by cabbage worms! I have never heard anyone comment on this til now! It really puts me off, too, and sometimes it's an almost sweet kind of taste to me at times. But blecch!!!!

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