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BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Teacher-honey -diamond super food
Posted by: dawgmama, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 2:08pm
As a teacher, honey is a diamond superfood. Is that just honey alone, or is it still super if I mix it into my lemon water or coffee? Plain lemon water at 5:30 am is just too tart. Just curious.
Posted by: wit, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 2:14pm; Reply: 1
I dont see why it wouldnt.
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 5:04pm; Reply: 2
Sure, why not?
Posted by: dawgmama, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 5:22pm; Reply: 3
I did not know if heating the honey up would change it's status. Glad to hear I am starting my day with a diamond SF combo. :)

Thanks
Posted by: Melissa_J, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 9:36pm; Reply: 4
I don't think it has to be raw honey, it would say so if it did.  Enjoy it!  Give me a few more months and I'll celebrate with some honey in green tea (a favorite combination there)
Posted by: Olerica, Wednesday, January 16, 2008, 9:39pm; Reply: 5
Melissa - Why aren't you drinking green tea?
Posted by: Gumby, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 12:16am; Reply: 6
I suspect it is the honey that she is not eating right now, since she is a gatherer.   :)  Us teachers get the honey!
Posted by: dawgmama, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 3:19am; Reply: 7
Melissa, I hope that when you are able to have honey you try a small jar of raw honey. It is so mellow and is supposed to be really good for you. In the meantime, I'll have some for you. ;)
Posted by: Devora, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 11:33am; Reply: 8
I had a NASTY reaction to regular honey, but when I got some raw organic honey I was fine.

I was told regular honey bees get fed both hormones and antibiotics to protect them against diseases that are a result of the hormones!  Plus they are fed white sugar.  Must effect the honey.
Posted by: Vicki, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 12:28pm; Reply: 9
I do like the "unheated" honey which is harder to find.  Bees keep the hive at around 93-95F year round while most "raw" honey is heated to  approximately 152F during filtration.  The properties of unheated honey are studied extensively and do not hold their value when the honey is processed through a higher degree of heating.  
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 12:38pm; Reply: 10
Im a beekeeper with 50 000 bee ( just one hive  :P )
and the only stuff I eat is raw honey from my own hive - we never heat it when we filtrate dead bees out of the honey.
We dont use any thing in the bee hive except some  formic acid as a miticide against the Varroa mite. and that is pretty safe.
Yes I do feed my bees sugar in the autumn when we have harvested the last honey or my bees would die during the long cold danish winter- but all this sugar is used up when I start to harvest again in june- august - it is very easy to see the difference between honey made from sugar and honey made from nectar .
The "artificial" honey is very white and solid and does not smell of much.
However note that honey made from Chestnut trees are quite white and solid.
Enjoy your honey  :D
Posted by: dawgmama, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 1:24pm; Reply: 11
Henriette, that is so cool 8)! Is bee keeping a very time consuming activity? I've often thought that when I retire, that I may like to try it.

Here in the US, in Wisconsin where I live, the bees have been at risk from some "bug" and the lady where I buy my honey used garlic powder to repel the pests and it worked! The big operations used some modern pesticides and were not as sucessful. Fasinating hobby! :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, January 17, 2008, 10:25pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from dawgmama
Henriette, that is so cool 8)! Is bee keeping a very time consuming activity? I've often thought that when I retire, that I may like to try it.

Here in the US, in Wisconsin where I live, the bees have been at risk from some "bug" and the lady where I buy my honey used garlic powder to repel the pests and it worked! The big operations used some modern pesticides and were not as sucessful. Fasinating hobby! :)


No not really .
I have one hive and my step dad has 2 hives so we share the honey and the work .
Most years I get about 15-20 kg honey from one hive- I could get more if I worked the bees harder.
We are most busy in april- september - the rest of the year the bees more or less take care of themselves. In april- may - we just check if theyve got room enough to breed and collect - about 15 minutes work pr hive pr week.
In june- august we collect honey about 3 x. one each month.
Every week we check if they are ok - needmore room- if the queen is still there etc
- and when we harvest it takes some time - maybe 1 -2hour each time. Depending on how much honey we collects.
And then we feed in august- late septmber- about 5 minutes every 2nd day...

It is a great hobby especially for a busy active B like me who sometimes find it hard to concentrate doing 1 thing at a time....
well you have to with the bees ;D or they get upset.


Posted by: dawgmama, Friday, January 18, 2008, 2:20am; Reply: 13
Thanks for the info.

I might have to offer my services to a beekeeper when I retire, to learn the techniques you described. I just think it is so interesting how the whole process works. I like the idea of producing my own superfood!

My dad makes home-made maple syrup each year, and my whole family goes "up-north" to help haul in sap, and cook it down into syrup. The kids love the rewards of their work. :) My dad is teaching me how, so I can carry on the tradition.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, January 18, 2008, 9:50am; Reply: 14
Quoted from dawgmama
Thanks for the info.
My dad makes home-made maple syrup each year, and my whole family goes "up-north" to help haul in sap, and cook it down into syrup. The kids love the rewards of their work. :) My dad is teaching me how, so I can carry on the tradition.


Wow - sadly the maple trees dont grow well here- cause I have always been facinated by the whole maple syrup thing- ever since I read "Little house in the big woods ;D
But I know some guys who the the same thing with birchtrees -it is traditional in Finland but not in Denmark  and the syrup taste nice mild - but not as nice as maple syrup - at least we gets good organic maple syrup here  :D
Posted by: Chanur, Friday, January 18, 2008, 7:03pm; Reply: 15
Your beekeeping sounds really interesting! Thanks for telling us about it! :)
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