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BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Neutral Fruits for Teachers
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Monday, January 14, 2008, 9:58pm

I went through the other five Fruits lists, and compiled a list of everything that's NOT on the Teacher Superfoods or Toxins lists -- I assume that these 23 are Neutral for us:

Acai berry
Asian pear
Breadfruit
Canistel
Cantaloupe melon
Carissa, natal plum
Casaba melon
Crenshaw melon
Feijoa [alias Pineapple guava]
Huckleberry
Jackfruit
Java-plum
Jujube
Persian melon
Plantain
Plum
Prickly pear
Prune
Pummelo
Sago palm
Sapotes
Spanish melon
Star fruit, carambola

There are some nice surprises in that list.  I had assumed that plums and prunes would be there.  But I hadn't thought of Asian pears (a readily-available substitute for apples & pears, until my quince tree starts bearing).  Or plantains, which should be a good substitute for bananas in cooking (with some added sugar).

There may also be some fruits that are Neutral for all GenoTypes, and so are not on the above list.  If anyone knows of any from the lists on the GTD web site, please let us know!

Posted by: Olerica, Monday, January 14, 2008, 10:27pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from Carol the Dabbler

Or plantains, which should be a good substitute for bananas in cooking (with some added sugar).


Plantains are more like potatoes than bananas - nice fried though.  And surely it's not escaped your attention that sugar is an avoid too?  Double fried plantains with a little salt and honey might be very nice as a now and again treat though.

THANKS so much for the list.  Very helpful!
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Monday, January 14, 2008, 10:39pm; Reply: 2

Quoted from Olerica
Plantains are more like potatoes than bananas - nice fried though.

Will bear that in mind -- especially since I'm now without parsnips, my A-nonnie potato substitute.  But still, I'm thinking that if I pre-cooked some plantains (since they're not as soft as bananas), they might make passable "banana bread."  Or, as you say, fried with honey.

Quoted from Olerica
... surely it's not escaped your attention that sugar is an avoid too?

I've been on the A-nonnie diet so long that I'm used to saying "sugar" when I mean "compliant sweetener."   :B  'Scuse, please!

Quoted from Olerica
THANKS so much for the list.  Very helpful!


You're welcome!

Posted by: Gumby, Monday, January 14, 2008, 10:43pm; Reply: 3
Thanks for doing that Carol!  I was glad to see prunes and plums were neutral for us...I had just gotten to really enjoy them as bennies!  I think they were the first fruits I looked for when I got the book lol!

Those are probably the only 2 I will eat off the neutral list, since most of the rest I either can't get around here or don't like enough to bother.  

I'm actually finding the SF fruit list not too bad.  I have to work to get my fruit in anyway, I am much more a veggie girl...except in the summer.  With grapefruit, blueberries, raspberries, cranberries, pineapple, and kiwis...with the odd date and prune...I am pretty happy.  Miss the easy and portable apple when packing food, but now I try and 'fruit up' at home. :)
Posted by: 2293 (Guest), Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 4:12am; Reply: 4
wow, I thought cantaloupe would be out...and crenshaw!  
I'm so glad we can have kiwis...I agree, I think we're pretty good in the fruit department.   ;D
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 4:26am; Reply: 5

Quoted from 2293
wow, I thought cantaloupe would be out...


If you live in the U.S.A., then what you call cantaloupe is NOT the neutral cantaloupe (which is a European melon rarely found in this country).  What you call cantaloupe is actually the SUPERFOOD Muskmelon!

Posted by: Gumby, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 5:31am; Reply: 6
Really Carol?  I had no idea that North American 'canteloupe' is actually muskmelon!  I can't stand the things lol, and the name muskmelon makes them just that much less appealing. :D  But...if they are a superfood...I might just give them a try this summer.  Who knows, maybe I will like them better. :)
Posted by: Mrs. Rodgers, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 7:26am; Reply: 7
Cantaloupe or muskmelon, whichever they are called, I always felt energized when I ate them for breakfast so I am glad to have them as a super food.  :)
Posted by: Devora, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 8:08am; Reply: 8
Thanks for the list.  Practically speaking though, what can be readily found?  Not that many.  I can get:

cantelope\prunes\plums and star fruit.

Though I am happy to have these four, I still feel very limited in my practical fruit selection!

I did find quinces recently and cooked them with some sweetener and fresh currants.  YUM!  (especially hot!)
Posted by: Mitchie, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 11:01am; Reply: 9
Quoted from Carol the Dabbler



If you live in the U.S.A., then what you call cantaloupe is NOT the neutral cantaloupe (which is a European melon rarely found in this country).  What you call cantaloupe is actually the SUPERFOOD Muskmelon!



I had to look up muskmelon and here's what it includes:

Cantaloupe (I've missed this soooo much!)

Casaba

Santa Claus (tried this last year and it was a good sub for honeydew)

Canary

Crenshaw

Could be more but that's what I found.

Posted by: Gumby, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 3:22pm; Reply: 10
Well, Mitchie...if you can try fish, then I can try a musky canteloupe melon. :D
Posted by: Joy, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 3:42pm; Reply: 11
I looked up tomatillo because it is on the superfood list and it is a mexican food not at all the color of tomatoes.  I looked up some recipes on the internet and might give some a try.  

FYI, jackfruit also has many names, one of which is durian (I believe its smaller because the jackfruit I ordered was 27lbs.  What an ordeal to cut up but really delicious.

Joy
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 3:52pm; Reply: 12
Before the GTD, I used to remember 'canalope' and 'honeydon't'.  ;D
Posted by: Vicki, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 4:09pm; Reply: 13
I can't explain why, but I have some doubts that plantain would be neutral for Teachers...  
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 4:46pm; Reply: 14

Quoted from Mitchie
I had to look up muskmelon and here's what it includes:

Cantaloupe (I've missed this soooo much!)
Casaba
Santa Claus (tried this last year and it was a good sub for honeydew)
Canary
Crenshaw

Could be more but that's what I found.

Even though all those melons are apparently closely related, they nevertheless have different ratings for the Teacher GenoType.  Muskmelon (also called cantaloupe in the US) is a Superfood.  True European cantaloupe, casaba, and crenshaw are all merely Neutrals.  (No word on Santa Claus or Canary.)  So unless you're really keen on one of the others, I'd say go with the muskmelon.

Quoted from Joy
FYI, jackfruit also has many names, one of which is durian (I believe its smaller because the jackfruit I ordered was 27lbs.  What an ordeal to cut up but really delicious.

It's true that Jackfruit and Durian are similar fruits, but they are not the same.  As you point out, durian is smaller (though not "small").  They are both characterized by an unappealing odor and a delicious flavor (I wouldn't have believed this either, till I tasted durian -- yummmmm!).  But most important for us Teachers, durian is a Superfood, while jackfruit is merely a neutral.  Durian can often be found in oriental markets, especially those that cater to south-east Asians or Filipinos.

Quoted from Drea
Before the GTD, I used to remember 'canalope' and 'honeydon't'.

That still applies, especially if when you say can(t)aloupe, you mean muskmelon!

Posted by: Olerica, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 8:14pm; Reply: 15
As a kid, I always ate muskmellon (yep, that's what we called it too) with a little sprinkle of salt.  Grandparents were big on this!

I think the italians wrap their cantaloupe with proscutto so I guess grandma musta got it somewhere.  I've never been a big pork eater, so we just ate it with salt.
Posted by: Joy, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 9:11pm; Reply: 16
Carol,

Yes, they are slightly different.  And the smell is odoriferous to say the least.  

I still have a bag of seeds in the freezer.  I read to boil them and add sea salt after you peel them.  I tried that a few times but some were tasteless.

Did you keep the seeds from the durian (assuming they're the same size as the ones in jackfruit which are large) and if you did keep them how did you prepare them?

Thanks.

Joy
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 9:55pm; Reply: 17

Quoted from Olerica
As a kid, I always ate muskmellon (yep, that's what we called it too) with a little sprinkle of salt.  Grandparents were big on this!

I think the italians wrap their cantaloupe with proscutto so I guess grandma musta got it somewhere.  I've never been a big pork eater, so we just ate it with salt.

Wow, does that ever take me back to Grandma's house!  We always used salt on both muskmelon and watermelon, and Mom still does.  Having often found myself eating melon with no salt in sight, however, I eventually noticed that it tastes very nice au naturel, and now prefer it that way.  No Italians in the family, by the way -- just the typical Midwestern English/German mix.


Quoted from Joy
Carol,Did you keep the seeds from the durian (assuming they're the same size as the ones in jackfruit which are large) and if you did keep them how did you prepare them?


I was offered the durian by a woman from the Philippines, who had mercifully already hacked it open, cut it into sections, and (near as I recall) removed the seeds.  I didn't know the seeds were supposed to be edible.  Wonder what their GTD ratings would be?
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