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BTD Forums  /  Nonnie Clubhouse  /  "Membrane Transport Deficiency Syndrome"?
Posted by: 521 (Guest), Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 7:29am
Would it be fair to describe a nonsecretor as having, in general, a "Membrane Transport Deficiency Syndrome"?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 2:25pm; Reply: 1
send us some links...... ;)
Posted by: 521 (Guest), Thursday, October 25, 2007, 12:39am; Reply: 2
Lola,

There are no links.  I'm just asking a question, based on how I've read nonsecretor cell biology as behaving.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, October 25, 2007, 2:27am; Reply: 3
that name you gave it sounds very probable! ;)
Posted by: Mitchie, Thursday, October 25, 2007, 12:25pm; Reply: 4
Howdy Ron,

Will you please elaborate?  As a fellow nonnie, I'm interested but clueless.  ??)
Posted by: Whimsical, Friday, October 26, 2007, 1:12am; Reply: 5
Are you referring specifically to lower levels of IAP or something else?
Posted by: CB, Friday, October 26, 2007, 10:37am; Reply: 6
Ronnie-O-Nonnie, I don't know if membrane transport is the issue, rather more intestinal permeability perhaps?  But if transport is the problem, Dr. Hans Neiper from Hannover Germany (deceased now), researched and developed several supplements that address this problem.  He put AEP or sometimes it appears as EAP with Calcium or Ca/Mg/K.  The first is the substance that is effective and the minerals are the carriers.  This allowed the correct things to go into the cell and the correct things to go out the cell.  I tried it some years ago because of cold intolerance and found it to be effective, but because I don't know what impact it all has on the digestive tract of a NS, I quit, since no testing was done on the substances as they relate to Blood Type Science.  Take care.  CB.
Posted by: 521 (Guest), Friday, October 26, 2007, 2:59pm; Reply: 7
Well, my thinking that there's a membrane transport deficiency, is that I've been told that the nonnies have a harder time getting things both into and out of the cell.  They don't pull in calcium as easily, they don't pull in fats and carbs as easily, and they don't put out their blood type antigen as easily.

In essence, it seems as though the problem has to do with getting things across the membrane.  Unless I'm confused.

Can anybody rectify my thinking here?
Posted by: Amazone I., Saturday, October 27, 2007, 5:51am; Reply: 8
::) sweety, isn't that merely the question of the electron donnors' ??) .....when gap junction should function??) !!! Have to re-read as well  :o :-/ :B ;D dito are fatty acids the implementing functioners....sooo I guess both have to interact for good work ;)
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 27, 2007, 9:15pm; Reply: 9
that s also the reason people should learn to breath!
I believe the majority forgets how very important it is.
heard somewhere that in China there are facilities where people are taught to breath correctly.
oxygen is our friend! ;)
Posted by: 521 (Guest), Sunday, October 28, 2007, 10:50am; Reply: 10
I like to train my breathing through exertive swimming and karaoke singing...
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 28, 2007, 4:10pm; Reply: 11
yes, I ve met quite a few people taking singing lessons......
the breathing techniques applied are right on!
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, October 28, 2007, 4:32pm; Reply: 12
I heard orchestra conductors live longer lives because of the waving motion in their arms opens up their chest and lets more oxygen in.
Posted by: 521 (Guest), Sunday, October 28, 2007, 8:22pm; Reply: 13
My favorite group to sing, is the Police.  You really have to yell and breathe.  I also like singing Junior Walker and the All-Stars, the Bee Gees, and Journey.
Posted by: CB, Sunday, October 28, 2007, 10:00pm; Reply: 14
I get mine through running 3 x week.   I'll start carrying a wand in both hands to add emphasis and increase lung capacity further.  Take care.  CB.
Posted by: Mitchie, Monday, October 29, 2007, 9:35am; Reply: 15
Quoted from 521
Well, my thinking that there's a membrane transport deficiency, is that I've been told that the nonnies have a harder time getting things both into and out of the cell.  They don't pull in calcium as easily, they don't pull in fats and carbs as easily, and they don't put out their blood type antigen as easily.

In essence, it seems as though the problem has to do with getting things across the membrane.  Unless I'm confused.

Can anybody rectify my thinking here?


That would explain why I have to ingest more of anything to get the same result as a secretor.  Thanks Ron!

Posted by: 521 (Guest), Monday, October 29, 2007, 11:19am; Reply: 16
No problem, Mitchie.  But don't take my guess as gospel.  
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