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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  gallbladder
Posted by: 471 (Guest), Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 12:45pm
An AB friend of mine wants to start BTD, but has had gallbladder removed years ago. Is there anything a person without a gallbladder should do differently or just start to follow the diet? Thanks.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 11:07pm; Reply: 1
I believe it will help her a great deal. :D
Posted by: 471 (Guest), Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 12:57am; Reply: 2
As I said, is there anything a person without a gallbladder should do differently, lola?
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 1:28am; Reply: 3
What the person should do differently is an individual adjustment. Some will be able to handle the diet as-is without discernable difficulty. Others may find they have to make adjustments such as size and frequency of meals as well as content in some cases.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 1:33am; Reply: 4
no, just make sure your friend stays compliant....BTD is antiinflammatory by excellence!
Posted by: eh, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 1:36am; Reply: 5
marylynn,
My 70 year old mother (type A) sans her gallbladder is doing relatively well on the diet. Ok, so she's not an AB, but speaking as an AB myself I don't see any problems in switching over to the diet. However, I would pay special attention to the ways of keeping her liver happy. In particular, a fresh vegetable juice (including AB beneficials like celery, parsley, cucumber, beets - in that order, by the way - 3X week. According to the Gerson institute one should be conservative with the beets as they have a powerful effect on the liver). In addition, limit the consumption of animal fats (found in lamb and yellow cheese). Stick to the lower levels recommended in the diet. Personally, if I had no gallbladder, I would make sure that I included a beneficial warm salad of dandelion greens dressed with olive oil and lemon juice in my diet frequently. (I grew up on this stuff!)
She'll do very well. No worries.
eh
Posted by: Beouemom, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 2:06am; Reply: 6
How do you think a person who was told they need their gallbladder removed (and has been having problems with fried foods etc) would do with ghee?  
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 2:15am; Reply: 7
a teaspoon a day will not hurt.
Posted by: Beouemom, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 12:05pm; Reply: 8
Yes, but will it help as I would recommend it for healing the gut and possibly the flared up gallbladder.  Also, would a gallbladder flush/cleanse be recommended?  I know so little about what advice I might give with helping to heal with actual gallbladder problems.  I for sure would not want to recommend something and only make the problem worse.  The doctor my friend went to said she did have a gall stone.  She was in great pain few weeks ago.  
Posted by: windchimes8, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 1:51pm; Reply: 9
This subject interests me as well since I have a strong reaction to lettuce.  Everytime I eat it I get severe pain in the middle of my stomach under my breast.  All nuts except almonds do the same thing.
Posted by: Jenny, Wednesday, October 24, 2007, 8:46pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from eh
marylynn,
if I had no gallbladder, I would make sure that I included a beneficial warm salad of dandelion greens dressed with olive oil and lemon juice in my diet frequently. (I grew up on this stuff!)

eh

Hi eh!
What is this warm salad of dandelion? Did you hop out into the back paddock or what? when you say warm do you mean blanched in boiling water? or tossed in the wok? please explain ??)
Jenny

Posted by: eh, Thursday, October 25, 2007, 3:25am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Jenny

Did you hop out into the back paddock or what?


...when the gate is left open I'm often loose in the top paddock, which is an occupational hazard in my line of work, Jen. lol

Wild dandelion greens are wonderful just blanched or eaten raw in salads if the leaves are young and tender. By the way, I never eat dandelion leaves when the plant is in flower. At that time, it is considered out of season. They are best eaten in late winter/early spring and also in Autumn at which times they offer the optimum levels of minerals etc. They are a gentle tonic for both the liver and the kidneys.

However, you can also find cultivated varieties of 'dandelions' sometimes simply called greens (especially by Italian Australians and Greek Australians) that are similar looking to dandelions but have blue rather than yellow flowers. The 'dandelion greens' I mentioned in my post above are actually called 'chickory' in Australia and are sold in large bunches in the supermarkets. I've seen the exact same greens sold as dandelion greens in the US, especially in the farmers' markets. In Australia,  'dandelion greens' or rather 'chickory' are not to be confused with the Belgian endive or witlof or chicory! I'm growing a slightly more bitter version of the chickory/dandelion green in my backyard where it has naturalised, taking over a large portion of my lawn and forming it's own veg patch. I can send you seed in the mail if you like. But it won't be ready for many months as it is just starting to send up flower shoots.

To cook them, simmer the leaves in unsalted water until they are tender. Strain and save the cooking water to drink. While the leaves are still hot, dress with a good olive oil/lemon juice/salt dressing. Can be eaten either hot or cold but is especially delicious when it is served as a warm salad. Serve with a good quality bread/feta cheese/Greek olives. Fantastic when accompanying a lovely sweet white fleshed fish lightly pan fried in olive oil (like the small yellow tails which are plentiful and cheap), or red mullet.  
eh
Posted by: Curious, Thursday, October 25, 2007, 8:45am; Reply: 12
Quoted from eh

To cook them, simmer the leaves in unsalted water until they are tender. Strain and save the cooking water to drink. While the leaves are still hot, dress with a good olive oil/lemon juice/salt dressing. Can be eaten either hot or cold but is especially delicious when it is served as a warm salad.

I bought some 'dandelion chicory' (cichorium intybus) seeds a few months ago and they are growing well in my garden. So far I have only eaten them raw, but I'll try your receipe - it sounds great!
Posted by: eh, Friday, October 26, 2007, 4:21am; Reply: 13
Curious,
I've never known anyone to eat - or even to recommend eating - these greens raw (except, young wild dandelion leaves). It's tough food! The type O stomach never ceases to amaze me...
eh
PS would you describe your chicory as having long dark green serrated leaves with a central white stem/vein when it's fully mature (and long dark green spears when it is still fairly young)? I have no idea what variety I am growing as the seed came from a friend in Sydney who got it from her Greek Australian neighbour who, in turn, was given it by her Italo Australian friend who got it from her relatives....
Posted by: Curious, Friday, October 26, 2007, 4:38am; Reply: 14
Eh, Yes the leave is long and serrated and I would describe it as medium green. It has a white stem in the middle. I can't remember how it looked like when it was young and I don't know how the flowers look like yet (am only growing it for the first time).
I ate it raw because it was listed as 'salad greens' in the seed catalogue, but I tried your olive oil receipe today and I loved it. (sunny)
The seed catalogue says: 'Popular Mediterranean green leaf with dandelion appearance, quick growing, use in salads or cooked, pleasant bitterness with subtle sweet background" (I can't quite taste the 'subtle sweet background', but I love the bitterness).
It is probably the same one you have, considering it is a 'popular Mediterranean green'.
Posted by: Jenny, Saturday, October 27, 2007, 8:59pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from eh




Wild dandelion greens are wonderful just blanched or eaten raw in salads if the leaves are young and tender. By the way, I never eat dandelion leaves when the plant is in flower. At that time, it is considered out of season. They are best eaten in late winter/early spring and also in Autumn at which times they offer the optimum levels of minerals etc. They are a gentle tonic for both the liver and the kidneys.



To cook them, simmer the leaves in unsalted water until they are tender. Strain and save the cooking water to drink. While the leaves are still hot, dress with a good olive oil/lemon juice/salt dressing. Can be eaten either hot or cold but is especially delicious when it is served as a warm salad. Serve with a good quality bread/feta cheese/Greek olives. Fantastic when accompanying a lovely sweet white fleshed fish lightly pan fried in olive oil (like the small yellow tails which are plentiful and cheap), or red mullet.  
eh

Brilliant! I'm printing off your information for my recipe collection. I'll go searching in my back yard immediately - I'm in rented accommodation with an unkempt yard at the moment but going to a place where I'll be gardening in pots for a while. I'll mail you off line if I can't find my own seeds.
Cheers,
Jenny

Posted by: Lola, Saturday, October 27, 2007, 9:06pm; Reply: 16
they taste similar to arugula......I love all those greens in my salads! ;)
Posted by: Jenny, Sunday, October 28, 2007, 8:29pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Jenny

Brilliant! I'm printing off your information for my recipe collection. I'll go searching in my back yard immediately - I'm in rented accommodation with an unkempt yard at the moment but going to a place where I'll be gardening in pots for a while. I'll mail you off line if I can't find my own seeds.
Cheers,
Jenny


I found some baby dandelion plants near by back door right next to an adult plant with the common yellow flower, so I'm sure they were authentic. I found them quite bitter to eat raw, but with 10 minutes boiling (I kept the water to drink), they were more palatable, and I used them as a warm salad with homemade sardine patties made with a bit of buckwheat flour and breadcrumbs.Very nice. Kept me going all afternoon.Dropped some seeds from the adult plant into a pot to take to my new home.Now that you've raised the topic, I'll look out for them in big old fashioned greengroceries if I can find one.(especially Mediterranean ones).

Cheers,
Jenny
Posted by: carmen, Monday, October 29, 2007, 12:52am; Reply: 18
Gotta watch out for Cat's Ears (Hypochoeris radicata)which is a common weed in oz with yellow flowers and often mistaken for dandelion. I don't think it is edible? Grows in a rosette or clump same as dandelion but has serrated leaves instead. Good for compost.

Love dandelion greens, chicory, endive, escarole - all the bitter herbs are really good for one's liver. Another way to eat - finely chop and place in the bottom of your soup bowl, then pour your serve of hot soup or broth on top, a little surprise underneath.
Good place in oz to find chicory & dandelion seeds is thru ebay, or online organic seed eg Greenharvest, Greenpatch, Eden Seeds, or healthfood stores.
Posted by: eh, Monday, October 29, 2007, 1:02am; Reply: 19
[quote=1281]Gotta watch out for Cat's Ears (Hypochoeris radicata)which is a common weed in oz with yellow flowers and often mistaken for dandelion. I don't think it is edible? Grows in a rosette or clump same as dandelion but has serrated leaves instead. Good for compost.
/quote]

Took the weeds out of my mouth, Carmen! ;D When I was little (in my twenties) and didn't know any  better, I used to gather these thinking they were the true dandelions. They tasted OK, and despite eating truckloads I don't think I poisoned myself (although it may explain a few things ;D).

We call these 'flat weed' and they are best left for the bees or the compost.
eh  
Posted by: eh, Monday, October 29, 2007, 1:04am; Reply: 20
Quoted from Jenny

Now that you've raised the topic, I'll look out for them in big old fashioned greengroceries if I can find one.(especially Mediterranean ones).


Jenny, you'll find the chicory (dandelion greens) in the supermarkets as well. Woolworths and Coles stock them and I've seen them lately in very big bunches which means they are in season wherever they are being grown. (Mine have bolted.) If you find that it looks like too much for you to eat, just freeze batches after you cook them. They defrost nicely. Once they are thawed and soused with your dressing they actually taste fresh. They are a lovely cold salad on hot days (which are here already.) I'm off to Woolies for a bunch now (really!).
eh
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, October 29, 2007, 8:29pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from eh
[quote=1281]Gotta watch out for Cat's Ears (Hypochoeris radicata)which is a common weed in oz with yellow flowers and often mistaken for dandelion. I don't think it is edible? Grows in a rosette or clump same as dandelion but has serrated leaves instead. Good for compost.
/quote]

Took the weeds out of my mouth, Carmen! ;D When I was little (in my twenties) and didn't know any  better, I used to gather these thinking they were the true dandelions. They tasted OK, and despite eating truckloads I don't think I poisoned myself (although it may explain a few things ;D).

We call these 'flat weed' and they are best left for the bees or the compost.
eh  


Now I'm getting confused. for instance the greens described earlier sound like dock weed. I think I'd better order from Eden. 8)
Jenny

Posted by: Jenny, Monday, October 29, 2007, 8:41pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from windchimes8
This subject interests me as well since I have a strong reaction to lettuce.  Everytime I eat it I get severe pain in the middle of my stomach under my breast.  All nuts except almonds do the same thing.


Me too! I ended up having a gastrosocopy and colonoscopy to check it all out, and found that I had an acute inflammation in the stomach of unknown origin. All the baddies were ruled out. $1000 later, the ball is back in my court. So I eliminated coffee, (some relief), and then got into the vegemite discussion thread which resulted in revisiting ghee and yeast, and after a few days of regular "Vegespread", whoopee, no discomfort anymore. Don't know which is the hero.
All this is anecdotal of course, and my GP probably won't be convinced but so what? Interesting about lettuce and nuts. I'll have a peanut butter sandwich today to see how I go.thanks Windchime8
Jenny

Posted by: Jenny, Monday, October 29, 2007, 8:43pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from eh


Jenny, you'll find the chicory (dandelion greens) in the supermarkets as well. Woolworths and Coles stock them and I've seen them lately in very big bunches which means they are in season wherever they are being grown. (Mine have bolted.) If you find that it looks like too much for you to eat, just freeze batches after you cook them. They defrost nicely. Once they are thawed and soused with your dressing they actually taste fresh. They are a lovely cold salad on hot days (which are here already.) I'm off to Woolies for a bunch now (really!).
eh

Hey that's an early start!
Jenny


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