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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Any TypeO Dairy Users?
Posted by: HigherGround247, Monday, September 3, 2007, 12:52am
hi, i was wondering if anybody uses the two neutral cheeses in LR4YT: Mozarella and Feta. Or if you have tried it, but it did not work out? It would be nice if i could eat these often because of the calcium. that is the main reason im interested.
Posted by: 476 (Guest), Monday, September 3, 2007, 1:12am; Reply: 1
If your worried about calcium there are a variety of good sources from more than dairy.  I was just looking at a website, worlds healthiest foods, and of the most calcium rich foods dairy was not as high as some good beneficial veggies for O's and other blood types, so check it out. You can also research supplements but be sure to check the type of calcuim, you can see what the calcium source from the NAP supplements and shop around if you cant afford those.
Posted by: Lloyd, Monday, September 3, 2007, 1:27am; Reply: 2
As an 'O', I would view calcium from dairy sources as a bonus, not as a source.
Posted by: 891 (Guest), Monday, September 3, 2007, 3:02am; Reply: 3
I have a small piece of mozza every day.  I always have.  It's my favorite cheese.

Also I eat feta whenever I can.  I don't usually buy it but I love Greek salads and they always have feta on them.  
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, September 3, 2007, 6:24am; Reply: 4
My O secretor eats the maximum of feta and mozzeralla every week - she has to ;-) when she is living with this B...
But she enjoys them and have no side effects. She eats butter and ghee as well- sometimes goat cheese.

I´m not very strict on the dairy part with her:  she is healthy and slim -so somtimes she is allowed cream as well ( special weekends ...)- and she enjoys that and have no known side effects.... but give her a glass of milk and her eczema is back in no time !

Posted by: KimonoKat, Monday, September 3, 2007, 6:47am; Reply: 5
I would love to eat cheezzzeeee...but there are consequences lol!

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, September 3, 2007, 7:07am; Reply: 6
I know Poly( fellow dane) eats cheese as well - and the other O´s I know here in Denmark do fine on cheese as well...
So I wonder if ones roots have something to do with how well an O feels on dairy ?!
Posted by: yaman, Monday, September 3, 2007, 8:00am; Reply: 7
The worst part of being an O is having to avoid dairy >:(

I consider myself lucky for I have no apparent problems with eating sheep/goat feta or fresh cheeses made of sheep and goat milk, almost daily.

Yoghurt however, is definitely an avoid for me. Yet I do have yoghurt cheese now and then. I buy either of goat, sheep or waterbuffalo yoghurt once a month and strain it well with the help of a cheese cloth.

And being such a good boy, once a year I reward myself with half a pound of traditional local ice cream made of slightly burnt goat milk and wild orchard root (salepi) ;D

It should be noted that O's can absorb calcium more efficiently from whatever source, if they eat red meat. That induces the secretion of IAP enzyme which absorbs dietary calcium.

Cheers,
Yaman
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, September 3, 2007, 9:38am; Reply: 8
Sounds interesting Yaman that icecream....
Posted by: yaman, Monday, September 3, 2007, 10:24am; Reply: 9
Henriette,

A good reason for a B to visit Southern Turkey (Antalya)  :)

Or for "not burnt" version, visit Istanbul:

http://www.salon.com/wlust/feature/1998/11/17feature.html

Hope you like the story :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, September 3, 2007, 10:54am; Reply: 10
Quoted from yaman
Henriette,

A good reason for a B to visit Southern Turkey (Antalya)  :)

Or for "not burnt" version, visit Istanbul:

http://www.salon.com/wlust/feature/1998/11/17feature.html

Hope you like the story :)


Interesting - thanks :D
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, September 3, 2007, 3:58pm; Reply: 11
Greens like kale and collards are a good source of calcium, as is mineral water. :)

I use pecorino romano made with sheep's milk, and some butter on occasion, and the very occasional bowl of Turkey Hill ice cream (no additives or gums). That's about it. Cow's milk cheese, including mozzarella, makes me tired and creates a lot of phlegm. Two minutes of enjoyment for three or four days congestion and fatigue--not worth it!
Posted by: OSuzanna, Monday, September 3, 2007, 4:59pm; Reply: 12
Brig, I'll have to check for those kind of reactions after mozzarella, tho I hardly ever have it, I still long for it.
I really need to bite the bullet, stop being a coward, and try making kale and collards!!!
I once had some canned soup (chicken?) that had kale in it, and I loved it.
Yaman, thanks so much for the red meat-calcium absorbtion connection...I love excuses to have more red meat. :)

As for me, ;D butter  ;Dw/food, and lately cheating with 1/2&1/2 in coffee :B (both no-no's.)
Posted by: 1206 (Guest), Monday, September 3, 2007, 9:01pm; Reply: 13
Dairy is not in my vocabulary any more, and I am feeling fine ;).
Posted by: Suzanne, Monday, September 3, 2007, 10:20pm; Reply: 14
I use mozzarella and feta both, but not in quantities large enough to meet calcium needs.  They just add flavor to a salad or a sushi nori wrap.  Other cheeses make me sleepy, but I don't have trouble with mozzarella or feta.    

I eat lots of greens and take calcium/magnesium capsules daily.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 12:35am; Reply: 15
Quoted Text
the red meat-calcium absorbtion connection..


http://www.dadamo.com/media/radio1.htm
hear Dr D saying this!
Posted by: HigherGround247, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 1:45am; Reply: 16
im having second thoughts about trying the mozarella. its looks so good and smells so delicious so i must give in at least once. i will eat it by itself and see the wonders it does. wish me luck, and thanks for the feedback. i just had an idea that maybe i can take an enzyme supp.
Posted by: 476 (Guest), Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 3:13am; Reply: 17
Just remember that dairy is not the end all be all source for calcuim. Due to advertising and what is taught in school about nutrition people tend to equate dairy as being the only way and the best way to get calcuim. Blood types other than B need to change their relationship with dairy, because its not the only source of dietary calcuim and its not the best source for us. If you are a nonsecretor O dairy is pretty much out althogether but if your a secretor you can tolerate more. I think it would be recommended to get your secretor status tested just for this reason so you will know which way you can go. Hopefully some of this information helps.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 4:54am; Reply: 18
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/p/delaware.pdf
read the part on dairy and osteoporosis.........they are bound alright!!
Posted by: Curious, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 5:00am; Reply: 19
Bone broth is a good source of calcium. I make them from beef bones, chicken carcasses, chicken feet or fish heads/bones. You need to simmer them for at least 12 hours (24 is better). I add 1 tablespoon of apple-cider vinegar to help disolve the calcium (I don't know yet wether I am a secretor or non-secretor, it is an avoid for non-secretors). I also add seaweed to get the minerals in the broth. I have been making the broths for quite a while now - I freeze them in small containers - and I found that my vegies/stir fries taste so much better. :) Curious
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 5:08am; Reply: 20
add freshly squeezed lemon juice  once the broth is done and before
you turn it off, that will do the trick nicely!

I see we have things in common...I love doing my gelatinous stock, so healthy!
Posted by: Curious, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 5:14am; Reply: 21
The lemon juice is a great idea - have not thought of it! Yes, it is so healthy and the food tastes so much better.
Posted by: HigherGround247, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 1:37pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Curious
Bone broth is a good source of calcium. I make them from beef bones, chicken carcasses, chicken feet or fish heads/bones. You need to simmer them for at least 12 hours (24 is better). I add 1 tablespoon of apple-cider vinegar to help disolve the calcium (I don't know yet wether I am a secretor or non-secretor, it is an avoid for non-secretors). I also add seaweed to get the minerals in the broth. I have been making the broths for quite a while now - I freeze them in small containers - and I found that my vegies/stir fries taste so much better. :) Curious



wow curious that does sound delicious, do you just leave a pot on the stove? I have a gas stove, would it be ok to leave it on overnight?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 1:10am; Reply: 23
a crock pot works best for overnight.
Posted by: HigherGround247, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 1:42am; Reply: 24
Quoted from lola
a crock pot works best for overnight.


ok thanks.
Posted by: Curious, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 2:49am; Reply: 25
Hi HigherGround,
No, I would not leave it on the gas stove overnight. I have a slow cooker (maybe that is the same as a crock pot?). Enjoy the results - the meals feel much more satisfying and I don't get hungry that quick after eating them.  :)Curious
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 3:08am; Reply: 26
same thing, yes.
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 3:50am; Reply: 27
Great ideas. I'll have to try making some broth this winter.  :P
Posted by: shells, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 12:28pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from Curious

No, I would not leave it on the gas stove overnight. I have a slow cooker (maybe that is the same as a crock pot?). Enjoy the results - the meals feel much more satisfying and I don't get hungry that quick after eating them.  :)Curious


Curious,  which beef bones do you tend to use?

Cheers   :D
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 6:49pm; Reply: 29
the ones with marrow are great, as well as the oxtail Brighid mentioned.
Posted by: 1412 (Guest), Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 9:40pm; Reply: 30
My dad and sister eat goat, sheep and buffalo cheese somewhat frequently with little ill effect. Though my dad can't tolerate sheep cheese. They also love goat milk ice cream.

I eat cheese on occasion, especially with pasta. One thing I love is goat milk yogurt.
Posted by: Susana, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 9:53pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from sayyadina
One thing I love is goat milk yogurt.


So do I, especially with maple syrup. But unfortunately I have read it is avoid for us :'(

:K)

Ps. Please do not hate me for these news. I have found this: http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/otd/archives/00000729.htm and if I find a more precise quote I'll post it.

:K)
Posted by: jayneeo, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 10:33pm; Reply: 32
I do fine on goat cheese. Goat milk ice cream is another story...and I am not sure why but I dont think we can have it.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 11:12pm; Reply: 33
I think you goat milk loving O's out there could drain your yogurt to remove most of the whey, and thus lower the bad effects of the whey on your systems.  Then it would be closer to soft goat cheese.
Posted by: Curious, Thursday, September 6, 2007, 1:20am; Reply: 34
Hi Shells,
I have a butcher where I live (Gold Coast) and he sells only organic and grass-fed beef. I usually ask for bones for making stock and I get a bag full of beef bones (they do have lots of marrow in it), I am unsure which part of the animal they are from - I'll ask them next time I buy some.  Curious
Posted by: shells, Thursday, September 6, 2007, 6:32am; Reply: 35
Thanks Curious,  I've been shopping at Coles and although the meat section is large the selection is quite limited and I'm unsure whether the meat is grass fed or grain.  I had always assumed all our meat was grass fed...now I'm not so sure.  I have seen bones bagged up but always thought it was for pets...am now wondering if it would  be OK for  broth or stock      ??)
Posted by: Curious, Thursday, September 6, 2007, 6:54am; Reply: 36
Hi Shells,
I am not sure, I guess you can always ask. I personally prefer organic meat and bones because it should have no antibiotics and other nasties in it. It depends where you live, but some health-food shops (e.g. Flannery's) have organic meet - am not sure about bones though.
Posted by: shells, Thursday, September 6, 2007, 7:10am; Reply: 37
Thanks Curious,

I will go ask and check it out

Cheers   :D
Posted by: 66 (Guest), Friday, October 12, 2007, 4:02am; Reply: 38
[quote=]Enjoy the results - the meals feel much more satisfying and I don't get hungry that quick after eating them. [/quote]

Do you eat the bones or just drink the broth?  How much and how many times a day?  Does this count as a serving of meat?

Thanks
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, October 12, 2007, 6:24am; Reply: 39
Well I have just been doing the whole broth thing with half a cow last weekend... what a work and the smell was not great at first
I used knee and marrow bones that I put in a pot overnight- with applecider winegar and water- let it stand and soak at leat 12 hours- brings out more of the good stuff.
Wine can be used as well-
I let it boil for 3 hrs  then strain it - and added new bones- this time more meathy ribs- that I had browned in the oven with herbs, veggies like onions carrots etc..that makes the stock more flavourfull I find
Now I let this boil/simmer for 15 hours. It looks pretty yucky...
Strain it- let it get cold so the fat will rise to the top- I take 80 % off and feed the birds with it
Then let the really gelly stock and fat boil again- this time on high heat so it gets really concentrated and reduced- when it is cool but not cold I put it in plastic icecube bags and keep them in the freezer- so easy to bring out the goodies during winter.
We use 1 cube when we make veggies soups- or add to rice or when we make sauces.
When I hat brochitis it really picked me up to get rice cooked in this stock.

I eat some of the meat... but it isn´t that interesting since all the good stuff is in te broth
My mum loves the marrow but I´m not crazy about it and most of it gets into the soup any way.
Posted by: Curious, Friday, October 12, 2007, 8:09am; Reply: 40
Quoted from organicmomma

Do you eat the bones or just drink the broth?  How much and how many times a day?  Does this count as a serving of meat?


My receipe is much more simple than Henriette's. I just buy bones, put them in the slow cooker for about 24 hours, together with some apple cider vinegar to help get the calcium out of the bones (I will replace the vinegar with red wine, just found out that I am a nonnie). I then put everything in a big bowl (through a strainer) and when it is cold enough in the fridge. The fat forms like a crust at the top and I take most of it off and throw it away. I keep some of the broth for the next 3-4 days in the fridge and freeze the rest.

I don't eat the bones, but I eat the meat that was on the bones. I probably have broth 5 days out of 7, sometimes more often if I feel like it. I either put it in my vegie stirfries or make a soup with the broth, vegies, sometimes minced meat or whatever I can think of.

I am not sure whether it counts as a serving of meat.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, October 12, 2007, 8:45am; Reply: 41
;-D I got mine from a french cook that might be why mine is a bit more worksome ;-D LOL
Posted by: Curious, Friday, October 12, 2007, 8:57am; Reply: 42
I like your recipe, but I am a lazy cook!  ;D
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, October 12, 2007, 9:08am; Reply: 43
Me too- that is why I only make a huge portion 2 x a year :-D
The browning the meaty bones - gives a brown stock/broth that works really well in winebased stews etc...Looks a bit fun in white rice but who cares if it taste good  :D
Posted by: Curious, Saturday, October 13, 2007, 8:21am; Reply: 44
I forgot in my receipe 3 posts above: I also add seaweed to the bones. Kombu is nice, so is wakame and dulse.
Posted by: comper, Saturday, October 13, 2007, 5:58pm; Reply: 45
thinking of type O's and dairy, goat milk butter is fine right, just like regular cow's butter?
Posted by: mikeo, Saturday, October 13, 2007, 9:48pm; Reply: 46
I have mozzarella or feta twice a week....if you're worried about calcium, then look to sesame seeds/butter....sardines with the bones...green leafy vegetables...and make sure you are eating good quality meat...grass fed...eating enough beneficial protein makes your O system absorb more calcium from your food sources.

need vitamin D so do not be afraid of the sun with sunscreen for 20 minutes at least three times a week...more so in the fall winter months
Posted by: drgnwng1, Sunday, October 14, 2007, 12:41pm; Reply: 47
Since I was born I have had issues with milk but found thatFat free plain cows yogurt was not a problem for me. I was wondering if it was an issue to add this back into my diet for calcium.
I am allergic to fish and the thought of a sardine just makes me shudder.
Beef seems to be causing issues also.
I do eat swiss chard,kale,broccoli,escarole and such. I also take a calcium tablet as well as B stress tabs.
Posted by: Becky, Sunday, October 14, 2007, 2:48pm; Reply: 48
I find that any dairy product makes my stomach very unhappy, to the point of having it come back on me.  So, once in a great while I give in and try some.......with the same result.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 14, 2007, 9:32pm; Reply: 49
drgnwng1, it is the whey that is the problem in Os and other BTs.
yogurt is not your best source of calcium, much less if you are an O.
try ground turkey and beef, to make patties, adding onions and parsley.......tasty!
Posted by: drgnwng1, Sunday, October 14, 2007, 11:21pm; Reply: 50
Lola,
We eat a lot of ground turkey and I add onions and garliuc. Never thought of fresh parsley. I just tried that for the first time the other day. LOL.
Jean

I thought you basically used it dry otherwise it was a garnish.
Geesh you would never know I cook.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, October 14, 2007, 11:55pm; Reply: 51
;)
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