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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Type O's and melons
Posted by: 440 (Guest), Saturday, July 28, 2007, 9:59pm
I have a question about melons for Type O's.

Melons (cantelope, honey dew melon, etc.) are avoids due to mold.  Where is the mold?  Inside or outside?

I would think that with a good vegetable wash and a scrub brush that one could cleanse the outside of a melon to make it free of mold.
Posted by: Kristin, Saturday, July 28, 2007, 10:39pm; Reply: 1
Muskmelons (aka cantaloupes in the US) are neutral for all blood types as per typebase. I think many people are confused with the classification of cantaloupes which in typebase refers to a European melon. From typebase:

Quoted Text
American "cantaloupes" are actually MUSKMELONS


Here's the muskmelon description from typebase:


http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

Ok... that didn't answer your mold question...  ;D  Personally, I am generally cautious with muskmelons as they are prone to be somewhat moldy on the skin surface if they have been in storage (which I think most have) and I am unsure if the mold spores could reach the interior of the melon. Certainly by cutting through the melon you could contaminate the flesh with the knife used.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Sunday, July 29, 2007, 2:48am; Reply: 2
This is a good time of year for melons, and I wouldn't worry about the muskmelons (US cantalopes) as long as they're fresh, not overly-ripe, and have no visible signs of mold.  During they winter they don't look or smell too great.  I prefer Crenshaw melons though, now that I can get them.  They're more delicious and usually grown more locally, therefore fresher.  I don't much care for canary melons, and they look pretty similar, so confirm what you're buying (canary melons are just not sweet enough for my taste).  I've never liked honeydew, so I don't miss those...why do they put honeydew in fruit plates anyway?
Posted by: 440 (Guest), Sunday, July 29, 2007, 3:03pm; Reply: 3
Yes, I was refering to a muskmelon (US cantalope).  I have the Blood Type O pocket guide from 2002, so it list this type of melon as an avoid.

Well, I'll just have to check the typebase 4 more often :-)
Posted by: Brighid45, Sunday, July 29, 2007, 4:36pm; Reply: 4
Melons can have mold and/or mold spores inside them as well as on the skin. They are neutral per Typebase (as Kristin mentioned) so unless you're really sensitive to mold, I wouldn't worry too much. The older the melon the more prone to interior mold it will be, so growing them yourself or buying local melons that you know are freshly picked is a good idea, if you can manage it.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, July 29, 2007, 5:13pm; Reply: 5
a moldy melon will smell distinctively of mold!!
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Monday, August 6, 2007, 11:08am; Reply: 6
Quoted from Kristin
Muskmelons (aka cantaloupes in the US) are neutral for all blood types as per typebase. I think many people are confused with the classification of cantaloupes which in typebase refers to a European melon. From typebase:



Here's the muskmelon description from typebase:


http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255

Ok... that didn't answer your mold question...  ;D  Personally, I am generally cautious with muskmelons as they are prone to be somewhat moldy on the skin surface if they have been in storage (which I think most have) and I am unsure if the mold spores could reach the interior of the melon. Certainly by cutting through the melon you could contaminate the flesh with the knife used.


Mold or not, I think I am more confused than ever about melons now.  The typebase says cantaloupe (from Italy) is not exported to the United States.  The other day I saw a"Tuscan Melon" in Trader Joes.  It looks very similar to the Italian cantaloupe shown in our typebase:  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?91.  

I have not eaten cantaloupe (U.S.A.) for years since being on Eating Right.  Instead I look for a crenshaw at the Farmers Market.  I have saved some seeds and attempted to plant them with not too much success yet.  To be honest, I never much liked cantaloupe and prefer the taste of crenshaws.

Honeydews are listed as an avoid for Type O:  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?201 so I have not eaten them for years, yet they are cross-referenced (?) as a muskmelon which is neutral:  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?255.
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, August 6, 2007, 9:42pm; Reply: 7
TypeO, if the crenshaw melon you're saving the seeds from is an F1 hybrid the seeds will not be usable. I would suggest ordering from a seed catalog like Seeds of Change or Baker Creek. You can get heirloom seeds and grow truly delicious melons that put anything you buy in a store to total shame. And if it's an open-pollinated variety you can save the seed from year to year and even choose for flavor, size etc.

Italian-grown antaloupes are probably not exported, but varieties grown in Italy might be available as seed here, which explains why you might see a specifically Italian variety in a market here.
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Tuesday, August 7, 2007, 12:54am; Reply: 8
Quoted from Brighid45
TypeO, if the crenshaw melon you're saving the seeds from is an F1 hybrid the seeds will not be usable. I would suggest ordering from a seed catalog like Seeds of Change or Baker Creek. You can get heirloom seeds and grow truly delicious melons that put anything you buy in a store to total shame. And if it's an open-pollinated variety you can save the seed from year to year and even choose for flavor, size etc.



Thanks for the tip.  I may try those seed catalogs next year.  I generally randomly put out a few seeds in May (either watermelon, winter squash, or crenshaws).  I have a few flowers growing now, and I've watched the bees pollinating them, but I'm not yet sure yet what I have growing.   I am not sure whether my crenshaw seeds were hybrid or not, and the lady selling the melons didn't know either.  It's rather late in the year for a crenshaw or watermelon, but we'll see what type of fruit or vegetale I get.
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