Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  another contradiction .......please explain to me
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Sunday, June 17, 2007, 10:41am
what's about this:

there are scientist's  who try to make us believe we should reduce our  foodintake for better health....and you, dearest Peter are telling us that reduced foodintake is a big stress for our bodies.....so ??) :-/ yiikes.....what shall I teach ??)......


got some fine A nonnies and they experienced that even with  the 600 calorie-intake a day.....
they didn't even moved their metabolisme during 4 to 6 weeks!!!!  :o :o


I've to breake through their *syndrome x*.....but I think I am going to knock the nut out by my brain and lurking to catch their psyche patterns ;) ;D ....where are the so cherished believes ::) :D .......... she might develop the flight and fight syndrome when I am coming into her house to observe her eating habits ;) ;D ;D :B (smarty)(dance)(whistle)
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 12:04pm; Reply: 1
Hi Isa,
don't you agree that the reduced food intake has to be calculated on age, metabolic rate, exercise.
John (resting) gave us the link of a Russian Syte on breathing for healing a lot of diseases and also overweight. I play recorder and flute nearly 4 hors daily and walk and I can eat as I like, but I am a secretor.
A nonnies and A _nonnies more have a slow metabolic rate from teen agers years and are easy hypothiroid in my family. My grandmother and my grandgrandmother ( died at 60 years many many yeras ago) had diabetes as a plus.
They were very probably A - nonnies with Italia pasta and cakes. My granmother however learnt to eat quite less a 50 with diabetes and to forget sugar. She was quite overweight since 30 years old till 84-5 years and lose after some pounds, just to arrive at 88 years (not very easy for her the last three years, as she needed to be helped but she was absolutetly conscious of her phisical decay with a little Parkinson also). One of her daughters, my aunt was nearly obese and had from 55 years rheumatoid arthritis and died at 75 of cortison diffused vascular damages after a lot of struggles against a kind of staffilococcus, won with a special vaccine prepared for her.
. I'd tell you on my sister (50 % perhaps nonnie) but I don't know for sure, but she must eat half than me to be 6/7 kilos oveweight at 44 years.

For all BTD is wonderful, but for nonnies BTD is crucial to their health and well being.

It's so intersting to know the family risk and to see the strategies to overcome them; my grandmother and her mother make see a little progress, and our generation and the next should go better and better (sometimes accepting bitter coffee for A nonnies LOL ).
All BTD theory and Dr D. teachings sounds so real !
Hi again and have a good work wth A nonnies and sindrome X
Maria Giovanna

Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Sunday, June 17, 2007, 12:13pm; Reply: 2
hi dearest MG...yep here you are right, must be honest that (letting go the white chocs..ok) ;...in normal situations I even can't go for the recommended amounts, because of getting fat immediately :-/
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 3:24pm; Reply: 3
there definitely is a link between CR ,calorie restriction, and lifespan Isa!
CR lowers cholesterol and blood pressure...
the trick is energy minimizing but still keeping a high intake of minerals,
vitamins and important nutrients.
Posted by: Laura P, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 4:17pm; Reply: 4
One important thing that you all are forgetting about calorie restriction is................

following BTD lowers the burden on your body from foods that cause it harm,  calorie restriction does the same thing, they do it in different ways, BTD changes the food you consume, where as calorie restriction lowers the amount consumed

Now one could argue that calorie restriction has different variables that weigh it, but in the long run I don't think it matters much.  Of course one should eat an appropriate amount of food for there individual body and not overeat, but isn't that just common sense?
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 5:17pm; Reply: 5
I'm looking at it like LauraP was describing.  If by calorie restriction, most people would be eating less of the normally consumed avoid foods, then they will benefit from the practice.  Those of us who follow the BTD consistently, including the portion and frequency recommendations, are not eating foods that are a drain on our bodies.  We also are not overeating, and we are receiving concentrated power packed calories which give us just what we need.

I follow a certain type of calorie restriction, where I eat no avoids at all, and I rarely, if ever, eat the Infrequent Neutrals (from the Health Library Series).  But I eat generous amounts of Beneficials and Super Beneficials.

I only begin to have a weight problem if I stop walking and Rebounding, and get too sedentary.
Posted by: 782 (Guest), Sunday, June 17, 2007, 5:34pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from lkpetrolino
One important thing that you all are forgetting about calorie restriction is................

following BTD lowers the burden on your body from foods that cause it harm,  calorie restriction does the same thing, they do it in different ways, BTD changes the food you consume, where as calorie restriction lowers the amount consumed

Now one could argue that calorie restriction has different variables that weigh it, but in the long run I don't think it matters much.  Of course one should eat an appropriate amount of food for there individual body and not overeat, but isn't that just common sense?


This is key to the whole thing, I believe - great post.

I don't think the jury's in yet on whether - if one avoids things that are bad for them - significant calorie restriction is better/worse/indifferent for lifespan and health. The studies that look at calorie restriction don't also look at the blood type diet and related stuff.

If teaching, I think it's best to just lay it out: Well, these guys found this, but they didn't consider this; and Dr. D says this because of ______________. And one day maybe science will actually nail down what the reality is in some broad-scale studies, or, not.

Posted by: Lola, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 7:32pm; Reply: 7
it was definitely an important point in Dr D s last Phoenix talk and in the master study guide.......
Victoria s approach is the right one for health and longevity.
Posted by: 941 (Guest), Sunday, June 17, 2007, 7:38pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from researchingthings


This is key to the whole thing, I believe - great post.

I don't think the jury's in yet on whether - if one avoids things that are bad for them - significant calorie restriction is better/worse/indifferent for lifespan and health. The studies that look at calorie restriction don't also look at the blood type diet and related stuff.

If teaching, I think it's best to just lay it out: Well, these guys found this, but they didn't consider this; and Dr. D says this because of ______________. And one day maybe science will actually nail down what the reality is in some broad-scale studies, or, not.


The only perfect diet is the one that works best for the individual on their terms.  Dr. D says one thing, Dr. Weil says another, a RD may tell you something else, the list goes on and on.  There are thousands of dietary recommendations, but it will only work for the person if it feels right to THEM.  Mind and body are not separate.  Amazing things happen to a person's health (both good and bad) based on their perspective of the treatment, be it medication, herbs, acupuncture, diet, or all of the above.  Personally, BTD is the only one I've read that makes sense to me, another person may feel that everyone should be vegan, and that diet works for them.  My opinion. 8)
Posted by: Kristin, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 7:48pm; Reply: 9
I remember hearing a researcher talk about calorie restriction experiments that were done with chimpanzees, and they reduced the caloric intake by about 30% or whatever the reduction needed to increase lifespan. The chimps did live longer... and healthier too I believe. But the researcher remarked that the frenzied behavior exhibitied by the chimps at mealtimes made him wonder if it was really worth it... that the  quality of their lives were sacrificed for extended quantity...

Living longer isn't necessarily better....
Posted by: 941 (Guest), Sunday, June 17, 2007, 7:51pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Kristin
I remember hearing a researcher talk about calorie restriction experiments that were done with chimpanzees, and they reduced the caloric intake by about 30% or whatever the reduction needed to increase lifespan. The chimps did live longer... and healthier too I believe. But the researcher remarked that the frenzied behavior exhibitied by the chimps at mealtimes made him wonder if it was really worth it... that the  quality of their lives were sacrificed for extended quantity...

Living longer isn't necessarily better....


Amen!  I see so many people in the hospital on dialysis, and ventilators, and often wonder if the quality of their life is making living longer seem better, especially since so many of them are on antidepressants.

Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Monday, June 18, 2007, 2:42am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Maria_Giovanna
Hi Isa,
don't you agree that the reduced food intake has to be calculated on age, metabolic rate, exercise.
Amen to that!!John (resting) gave us the link of a Russian Syte on breathing for healing a lot of diseases and also overweight. I play recorder and flute nearly 4 hors daily and walk and I can eat as I like, but I am a secretor.
A nonnies and A _nonnies more have a slow metabolic rate from teen agers years and are easy hypothiroid in my family. My grandmother and my grandgrandmother ( died at 60 years many many yeras ago) had diabetes as a plus.
They were very probably A - nonnies with Italia pasta and cakes. My granmother however learnt to eat quite less a 50 with diabetes and to forget sugar. She was quite overweight since 30 years old till 84-5 years and lose after some pounds, just to arrive at 88 years (not very easy for her the last three years, as she needed to be helped but she was absolutetly conscious of her phisical decay with a little Parkinson also). One of her daughters, my aunt was nearly obese and had from 55 years rheumatoid arthritis and died at 75 of cortison diffused vascular damages after a lot of struggles against a kind of staffilococcus, won with a special vaccine prepared for her.
. I'd tell you on my sister (50 % perhaps nonnie) but I don't know for sure, but she must eat half than me to be 6/7 kilos oveweight at 44 years.

For all BTD is wonderful, but for nonnies BTD is crucial to their health and well being.

It's so intersting to know the family risk and to see the strategies to overcome them; my grandmother and her mother make see a little progress, and our generation and the next should go better and better (sometimes accepting bitter coffee for A nonnies LOL ).
All BTD theory and Dr D. teachings sounds so real !
Hi again and have a good work wth A nonnies and sindrome X
Maria Giovanna



The A nons in my family have to avoid all sugars even most all the neutral ones like the plague. We are much more like O nonnies rather than A's in that regard. We all have to avoid wheat and all the unhealthy oils in order to be healthy. Personally for me a diet that is moderately high in the healthy fats is a beneficial for me because a low fat diet creates horribly dry and cracked skin. No wheat,no trans fats, and definitely no low fat for me. Arthritis,allergies and autoimmune disorders affect the type A's in my family with about equal prevalence as it does the type O's. I think it is because most of us are nonnies.
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, June 18, 2007, 8:06pm; Reply: 12
Once I had eaten with high BTD compliance for some time (about 6 months), my body somewhat self regulated the quantity of foods that I eat...  It just stops tasting good when I've had enough.  I don't even desire avoids really...  I walked by some avoid at a party Saturday and had absolutely no desire to eat it; went on to something that was beneficial and enjoyed that.

The key for me was to get away from the foods for the interval and let any residue clear somewhat from the body.  Thhis can be difficult since the attraction is so great initially.  Whether it being some craving for the food or just the mindset that it used to be OK, why do I need to stop now...  
I call it a retraining period.  I needed to learn to look at avoids differently and learn to put meals together in a way that excludes avoids.  
Posted by: 941 (Guest), Monday, June 18, 2007, 11:52pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from ABJoe
Once I had eaten with high BTD compliance for some time (about 6 months), my body somewhat self regulated the quantity of foods that I eat...  It just stops tasting good when I've had enough.  I don't even desire avoids really...  I walked by some avoid at a party Saturday and had absolutely no desire to eat it; went on to something that was beneficial and enjoyed that.

The key for me was to get away from the foods for the interval and let any residue clear somewhat from the body.  Thhis can be difficult since the attraction is so great initially.  Whether it being some craving for the food or just the mindset that it used to be OK, why do I need to stop now...  
I call it a retraining period.  I needed to learn to look at avoids differently and learn to put meals together in a way that excludes avoids.  


That must be the key.  Retrain yourself.
Posted by: Draginvry, Friday, October 5, 2007, 3:08am; Reply: 14
Quoted from Shane

Retrain yourself.


I must be more tired than I thought.  I could swear that I just read that as "Restrain yourself!"
Posted by: Lola, Friday, October 5, 2007, 3:55am; Reply: 15
well there is quite a bit of Restraining in Retraining yourself, right?
Posted by: 552 (Guest), Friday, October 5, 2007, 9:13pm; Reply: 16
On the other hand, not eating enough is a huge stress on the body - cortisol levels go through the roof in anorexia.  Hence Dr.D's recommendation to feed type A kids six times a day (see article on NAP site) - keeps cortisol levels lower. Not enough carbs for your activity levels raises adrenaline levels - over a long period of time this combination causes adrenal burnout, perhaps the cause of the frenetic activity among the mice. And adrenal burnout causes all sorts of emotional symptoms. We're after balance here, folks. I'm quite sure the guidelines in LR4YT are balanced, like Victoria said.  So I guess I'll weigh in here in favor of Dr. D's opinion that reducing calories that far is a stress.
Posted by: Ronagon (Guest), Friday, October 5, 2007, 9:26pm; Reply: 17
I would argue that the most important way of restricting calories should be restricting carbohydrate calories, as I've read that carb metabolism produces the most free radicals...
Print page generated: Sunday, November 23, 2014, 12:23am