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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  whole grain flour mush and phytates
Posted by: 159 (Guest), Saturday, June 16, 2007, 9:30pm
Do you think it's a bad idea to cook whole grain flours like dark/medium rye flour as it's done with corn mush (polenta), simply by boiling it, or can you only cook flour from grains that need soaking with yeast to eliminate unhealty substances?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, June 16, 2007, 10:22pm; Reply: 1
Quoted Text
can you only cook flour from grains that need soaking with yeast to eliminate unhealty substances?


explain what you mean by soaking with yeast?

Posted by: 159 (Guest), Saturday, June 16, 2007, 10:39pm; Reply: 2
i mean, since rye needs to  be soaked but flour can't be soaked, can you only eat it after having used it to make something like pizza, or a cake which require yeast too?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, June 16, 2007, 10:46pm; Reply: 3
if rye is a compliant grain for your bloodtype, it doesn t need to be soaked necessarily, unless you eat it no other way.

roux can be done with any type of flour, so I believe a type of polenta from other grains would also work.......a type of pure.
Posted by: 159 (Guest), Saturday, June 16, 2007, 11:41pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from lola
if rye is a compliant grain for your bloodtype, it doesn t need to be soaked necessarily


it's marked as beneficial, does it mean that even if i don't soak rye, it's phytates aren't a problem?

is it the same with soy milk or any other legume that is beneficial? because I read about how there is a loss of zinc, iron and other minerals absorption because of phytates, even soaking beans and grains, and therefore meat and fish should be preferred....but that's quite a problem for type As.
Has Dr. D. ever said something about phytates being a problem or not even after soaking ?
Posted by: Alia Vo, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 3:13am; Reply: 5
I think you will be fine to eat the rye flour cooked with filtered water or any type of compliant liquid.  You do not need to necessarily add any type of yeast to eat rye flour over the stovetop.

Alia  
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 4:53am; Reply: 6
jler,
pre soaking is fine, but if you are using ground soy as flour or ground rye or whatever, you do not need to pre soak the powder.

I have often done my own sprouted grain or bean flours, although that does take some days to soak, sprout, then dry or dehydrate and finally grind into flour.........

it is a matter of individuality and finding out how well you digest your beneficial or neutral grains, etc.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 7:02am; Reply: 7
I normally soak all WHOLE grain product - but flours and grains due to the phytates.

In Denmark it has been common to eat all kinds of porridges made with all kinds of flour and grain( Rye,rice, barley, millet, oats, wheat, buckwheat)

When I look in my grandmother and great grandmothers recipe books ( from 1850- 1940)
it is clear that it has been custom to soak at least wholegrain products. White fine flours do not process the same problem with phytates.

If you use whole grain rye flour- I would soak it overnight with water - maybe a tsp lemonjuice or yoghurt.
I wouldnīt worry about fine flours.
The good thing about soaking is that you donīt have to cook the final porridge mush so long.

When I make pancakes or bread I soak the flour overnight in the liquid - and add the rest next day.
Makes really good wholegrain pancakes that way.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 2:43pm; Reply: 8
and you do not discard the soaking water?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, June 17, 2007, 4:42pm; Reply: 9
If I cook whole grains I use fresh water.
When I bake I donīt... it is really the soaking in slightly acid that neutralize the phytates. i
It is not like when you soak beans - where you have to be really carefull with new water.

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http://www.suegregg.com/about/c.htm
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