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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  My Bio prof. says acorn squash is pumpkin
Posted by: Eric, Tuesday, May 29, 2007, 11:25pm
Apparently an acorn squash is just a small green pumpkin, according to my Biology professor.  So I was wondering if it could possibly be bumped to a beneficial... which would rock.  being that they're so much more convenient and delectible than the friendly jack-o-lantern.
Posted by: jayneeo, Tuesday, May 29, 2007, 11:29pm; Reply: 1
shall we vote on it? I'm for it.
I planted a squash called "coban pumpkin" from guatamala....wonder where it stands, looks more like a small green football.....
Posted by: Bethysue, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 12:13am; Reply: 2
All I know is it is the first solid food I ever fed my little baby and she loved it so much she tried to take the spoon out of my hand.  But as for it being a bene....Dr. D? any thoughts?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 1:53am; Reply: 3
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/m/archives/00000099.htm
nice read on squash....
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 2:08am; Reply: 4
Hey Jayneeo, I planted Coban Pumpkin also. It is climbing like crazy and covering my mulch pile/compost pile wire and all. I have to go out and defend the tomatos daily. I've posted about the squash versus pumpkin thing before and pointed out that various members of the maxima, pepo, and moschata families are all commonally called pumpkins and other members of all of these families are called squash. Since I found out that I am a nonsecretor it is a moot point to me, they are all neutral or beneficial for me(shrug). BTW the catalogue says to eat Coban Pumpkin when it is the size of a tennis ball like zuccinni.
Posted by: jayneeo, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 2:36am; Reply: 5
hey, thanks, gcg! Mine is still baby size...but let me know how it is for eatin'.
Posted by: OSuzanna, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 3:13am; Reply: 6
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
It is climbing like crazy and covering my mulch pile/compost pile wire and all. I have to go out and defend the tomatos daily.


(tee hee, wait til he finds out the guy sold him kudzu) (think) ;) ;D
Posted by: OSuzanna, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 3:17am; Reply: 7
Quoted from erictm998
Apparently an acorn squash is just a small green pumpkin, according to my Biology professor.  So I was wondering if it could possibly be bumped to a beneficial... which would rock.  being that they're so much more convenient and delectible than the friendly jack-o-lantern.


I'm voting that they are close cousins, not the same thing! Sorry, just being horticulturally, biologically Virgo-y (picky).
Yummy, nontheless!
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 3:42am; Reply: 8
Osuzanna! As if a southern boy like me wouldn't recognize kudzu. I think Sherman seeded the south with kudzu rather than sowing the fields with salt.
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 8:01am; Reply: 9
Quoted from erictm998
Apparently an acorn squash is just a small green pumpkin, according to my Biology professor...


Pumpkin, common US 'Acorn Squash' {Cucurbita pepo - Cucurbitaceae}

In one since your Prof. is probably technically correct  - As all Cucurbitaceae species readily hybridize {ie: Cross-Pollinate}. To Breed varieties true to seed particularly Cucurbita species ia real trick as they say the pollen can spread up 7 miles...fine mesh netting to say the least is involved.

On the other hand depending on your locale C. maxima & C. moschata can also be called an 'Acorn Squash'.

But the variety/strain of C. pepo used for an Acorn Squash has been selected over time to produce it, you would have to spend some time to develop a Pumpkin variety to an Acorn...

I am curious about this Guatemala "Coban" thingy...

Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 11:13am; Reply: 10
Schluggel, Coban Pumpkin is C. Pepo. This is the first year for the seed to be widely sold in the U.S. as far as I know and it is suppose to be eaten in the immature form like courgettes. Further info will have to wait for the picking.
Posted by: OSuzanna, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 11:31am; Reply: 11
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Osuzanna! As if a southern boy like me wouldn't recognize kudzu. ;) I think Sherman seeded the south with kudzu rather than sowing the fields with salt. :X



Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 1:04pm; Reply: 12
I like the Patty Pan squash or Delicata types - Whatever their Latin Binomial is?

Kudzu is an underutilized resource/medicine - though it doesn't tend to be as rampant as much in its native Japan. Kudzu starch is even better than the Glucomannan truth be told...
Posted by: Lisalea, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 1:20pm; Reply: 13
Well, "IF" acorn squash is pumpkin ...  B Secretors can't have it since it's an AVOID  ::) ??) :'( >:( :-/
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 30, 2007, 2:53pm; Reply: 14
In my opinion it isn't since I have allways heard it referred to as acorn squash but then I have allready noted my skepticism of the differential between pumpkin and squash.
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 1:20am; Reply: 15
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
but then I have allready noted my skepticism of the differential between pumpkin and squash.

U r skeptical then??)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 3:14am; Reply: 16
Not in that way. Every seed catalogue that I have seen lists Acorn Squash as a winter squash which is listed as acceptable to B secretors. My skepticism lies in the other direction untill the typebase list squash and pumpkins by their common gardening names (there are three main families with over 100 varieties) or their scientific names. As I said though, I don't have a dog in this fight. Both are acceptable for B nonsecretors. That is what I get for belonging to organicgardening.com forum as well as dadamo.com.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 7:55am; Reply: 17
I have noticed that if I eat regular pumpkin like the orange Connecticut Field type- I get lots of gas
While if I eat winter squash like blue hubbard or Butternut I feel fine.

I do think the whole matter is VERY confusing....

but after all pumpkin is only a tier 2 avoid for secretors so.....
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 12:30pm; Reply: 18
Heinriette, the Connecticut Field type was breed for fall decorations around Halloween, not for eating. I prefer all the winter squashes related to butternuts myself as they grow best in my climate but they include some that are labled as pumpkin.
Posted by: Schluggell, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 1:01pm; Reply: 19
Butternut typically C. moschata

Winter Squash {Keepers} C. maxima (gets big)

Most other English named Squashes are Summer {eat fresh, rot quick} C. pepo

Personally I've never partaken of Cushaw C. mixta (from Spanish, probably mixed with other anative vars.) can't comment.

"Moschata" is a little more intriguing - In modern parlance seems to mean "Musklike". But the word origin is of much older antiquity apparently Yiddish/Hebrew for Moscow the word first used to describe some Turkish plant from Eastern Europe...Don't have the time now to confirm any of this.

Intriguingly the Old World Cucurbitaceae species were used more for their Aroma before chemical perfumes & Europeans believed bathing was unhealthy.
See for example the references for the Pocket Melons in the 'Cornucopia' by Stephen Facciola ISBN-10: 0962808709 , ISBN-13: 978-0962808708
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 1:31pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Not in that way. Every seed catalogue that I have seen lists Acorn Squash as a winter squash which is listed as acceptable to B secretors. My skepticism lies in the other direction untill the typebase list squash and pumpkins by their common gardening names (there are three main families with over 100 varieties) or their scientific names. As I said though, I don't have a dog in this fight. Both are acceptable for B nonsecretors. That is what I get for belonging to organicgardening.com forum as well as dadamo.com.


That makes sence gulfcoastguy, I thank-u  ;D :)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 3:27pm; Reply: 21
Schluggle, the C. Mixta varieties are less sweet and more coarse fibered than the C. Moschatas. They were in fact originally raised by the native indians for their large seeds which were roasted and eaten like pumpkin seeds (pepitas). They do well in hot dry climates while Moschatas do well in hot humid climates. The Maxima varieties do not do well in my climate. The squash vine borers, squash bugs, stink bugs, and cucumber beetles wreck havoc on them an I refuse to poison them.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 31, 2007, 3:30pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Heinriette, the Connecticut Field type was breed for fall decorations around Halloween, not for eating. I prefer all the winter squashes related to butternuts myself as they grow best in my climate but they include some that are labled as pumpkin.


Stupid danes they eat it ;-D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, June 1, 2007, 1:13am; Reply: 23
Woo Hoo! The first 2 Coban Pumpkins are on the vine. Sunday dinner maybe?
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