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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Cooking Bennies/Neutrals with Avoids?
Posted by: 374 (Guest), Wednesday, May 23, 2007, 10:24pm
Hi guys!

Does anyone have any idea whether bennies and neutrals get tainted when cooked with avoids?

Thanks!  ;D
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 23, 2007, 10:28pm; Reply: 1
no such thing!! sorry

to each their own......
Posted by: Alia Vo, Wednesday, May 23, 2007, 10:44pm; Reply: 2
A single avoid food item remains an avoid, even if it is combined with several beneficial foods.  

In regards to commercial food products, it is always best to check the entire food label for complete ingredients.

Alia
Posted by: Brighid45, Wednesday, May 23, 2007, 11:03pm; Reply: 3
If you are talking about something already prepared--canned, packaged, frozen, from the deli or takeout counter, whatever--check the label to read the ingredients or request a list. For an avoid to be less troublesome, it should come far down the list. Notice I said 'less troublesome'. If an avoid is in a food or recipe, it will make its presence known. You then have the decision of whether or not you want to eat it along with whatever beneficials or neutrals are in the food.

If you're talking about a recipe, you can substitute a neutral or beneficial ingredient for the avoid ingredient, nine times out of ten. :) If you need help with ideas please let me know, I'd be glad to offer suggestions.
Posted by: 374 (Guest), Thursday, May 24, 2007, 1:17am; Reply: 4
Sorry guys, I don't think I fully explained what I meant...

I meant, if you cook bennies/neutrals with avoids (say, in a family meal) and then you pick out the avoids and eat the rest, are the bennies/neutrals tainted?
Posted by: geminisue, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 1:35am; Reply: 5
I understand what your saying, If an "O" had a sirloin patty that was cooked and placed in a wheat bun can you eat it with no ill affect Right?

I don't know the answer but if that was the only choice, I think I would remove it from the bun, run a fork sideways across it, and season with compliant seasoning, if possible and enjoy.

If your making it yourself, I would leave the avoid out and if other family members want it in, leave them add it to there, or cook a small batch separate than you don't have to worry, especially if you have health issues your dealing with.

If it's something like chili, I don't think taking the kidney beans out would help it especially since its cooked for so long, all the flavors and consistency would be in it   Hope this helps!
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 1:38am; Reply: 6
If it is something that can absorb juices, you would be eating some avoids in that way.  For example, tofu simmered in beef broth.  

But it's a way to start, and the important thing is to begin wherever you are right now.  :-)  You can fine-tune the system as you go, and this is a lifetime procedure.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 2:43am; Reply: 7
beef broth has no lectin unlike chicken broth, which does.
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 3:25am; Reply: 8
I'd say it depends on the avoid itself. You probably would do well to consider any food cooked with an avoid to have some of that avoid in it in some way, whether you're dealing with a lectin, a metabolic inhibitor, etc.

When you're cooking for more than one blood type or for family members who don't follow the BTD, I've found you're usually faced with a compromise. Just do what you can and let the rest go. Even a 50% compliance rate is better than 0%, you know? :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 6:04am; Reply: 9
I have been wondering about the same:
My family of O´s eat chicken at times- and sweet as they are- they cook s snitzel of turkeybreast on the same pan that fried the chicken.
Now this happends maybe 3 or 4 times a year. I don´t think a lot of juices are mixes- and the chicken breast are skinless so no fat .
Problem ? !
Posted by: angel, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 5:10pm; Reply: 10
My experience with roasted meat and potatoes sunday dinner has been one of ending up sick because they cooked together, even though I ate only the meat. Over our vacation I got just little of something that was contaminated and it has been causing problems. My take is this it really depends on how sensitive and how sick you get from it.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 5:13pm; Reply: 11
I think you might be right
- I´m quite sensitive about chicken- but I have never felt anything when I had turkey fried on the same pan as chicken... but on the other had I wouldn´t eat turkey cooked in tomatosause.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 5:31pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from lola
beef broth has no lectin unlike chicken broth, which does.


Thanks for this reminder, Lola.  I knew that, once upon a time, so this was a poor example.

Henriette,
I don't think you are a a great risk if your turkey is cooked in the same pan as chicken.  However, if your turkey is simmered in chicken broth, then I would stay away from it.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 24, 2007, 7:01pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Victoria

Henriette,
I don't think you are a a great risk if your turkey is cooked in the same pan as chicken.  However, if your turkey is simmered in chicken broth, then I would stay away from it.

Thanks - just my thought
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