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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  About Mayo
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 7:38pm
I love Mayo, and I am not fat.

In the BTD it is listed as an avoid (in the books at least) Why is that?

When you make your own mayo, it only contains neutrals or beneficials. Egg yolks, lemonjuice, olive oil, and perhaps garlic and salt. Some add a tiny amount of mustard or use vinegar instead of the lemonjuice.

Mixing beneficial and neutral foods, can sometimes make an avoid product, if it is heated to high temperaturees or cooked for a prolonged time. But when you make mayo, you simply mix everything, nothing is processed in any way.

Is anyone able to solve this mystery?

Posted by: 1005 (Guest), Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 7:47pm; Reply: 1
I'm with Lasse: I'd love to know whether we can make our own without any problems: it would be so great to add a bit of mayo to green beans or to a piece of bread!   :P
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 7:48pm; Reply: 2
Making your own compliant mayo is OK.  That is why mayo was removed from the later food lists like typebase.
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 7:57pm; Reply: 3
Are you an experimenting type or just curios, you could make your own mayo this way:

1 egg yolk (pasteuriced, no salmonella!)
pinch of salt
½ tsp. of lemon juice or (white) vinegar
pinch of (white) pepper
1-1½ dl oil


Mix the egg yolk with all the ingredients except the oil untill it is smooth. mix in the oila small amount a time (1 tsp) and mix it with high speed whipping. Use a machine for this if you a out of shape or not a french cook.

The magic in this recipe is to use an egg yolk and oil with roomtemperature, otherwise it ruins everything. And it does take some practice to get it right with the whipping process, but so does almost everything else in life. Add a vey small amount in the beginning and when the texture gets "mayo-like" you can begin pouring in a fine small squirt. Pratice and you become a master. It can take a lot of words to describe, but its easier to do than read about it, like so much else. When you got it right its easier than going to pick up mayo in the super market.


If you like, you can add a dash of mustard if you like in the beginning (french dijon is made for this) and squeezed garlic or chilli or other flavourings. Your imagination is the limit here.
  Are you using olive oil, it is best to not to use the strong and pungent virgin type. If you do, mix it with some flavourless oil to. like sunflower, mustard seed or what have you.
 
In fact virgin olive oil is to be used sparringly or with wisdom. It is not made for cooking for example, as heat makes it taste just awful, as many people mistakenly believes. For cooking used cheaper olive oils.

...many words...




:
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 8:01pm; Reply: 4
thanks MoDon and Itita.

I love it on tuna sandwich especially...  ;D
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 8:43pm; Reply: 5
This is a FABULOUS Mayo

Vegenaise Grapeseed Oil

Ingredients:

Grapeseed Oil, Filtered Water, Brown Rice Syrup, Apple Cider Vinegar, Soy Protein, Sea Salt, Mustard Flour, Lemon Juice Concentrate
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 9:08pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Lasse


Mixing beneficial and neutral foods, can sometimes make an avoid product, if it is heated to high temperaturees or cooked for a prolonged time.


:o

What high temperatures r we talking about ?
and
What period of  prolonged time ?
Thanks  :)
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 9:18pm; Reply: 7
Compliant mayonsise is fine for you.  Most commercial mayonsise contains at least one avoid.  

CR4YT contains an ABO blood compliant mayonaise recipe.

As follows is a non dairy mayonaise from the Recipe Index:
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor.cgi?122

Alia
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 9:37pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from funkymuse
This is a FABULOUS Mayo

Vegenaise Grapeseed Oil

Ingredients:

Grapeseed Oil, Filtered Water, Brown Rice Syrup, Apple Cider Vinegar, Soy Protein, Sea Salt, Mustard Flour, Lemon Juice Concentrate


Us unlucky A seccretors don't get to have vinegar of any sort. :'(
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 10:25pm; Reply: 9
Quoted Text
Mixing beneficial and neutral foods, can sometimes make an avoid product, if it is heated to high temperaturees or cooked for a prolonged time.


now that one you will have to explain to me!! lol
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 10:50pm; Reply: 10
I noticed this mayo recipe from another thread from our forum member, Daniela:
Quoted from daniela

Put an egg, yolk and white, room temp. in the mixer bowl.
Add a good pinch of salt, 1 tsp of english mustard and start mixing slow speed.
After 30 sec. add a good quality organic olive oil (NOT exatra vergin oil, it's too strong), veeery slowly, and when mayo begin be tick, you can go faster. So put 1 lemon juice and 1 tbsp apple vinegar. Add about 2/2,5 dl olive oil per egg.
You can now put in fridge for 3 days max.
You can also add at the end some chopped flat persil, garlic, basil, chillies or, the best, you can mix some canned tuna and capers, it's nice on fish or even on meat and hard boiled eggs.
I would give you also the "rouille" recipe, it's a french sauce : put a pinch of safran in 1 tbsp hot water, then in a mortar crush an half garlic, 1 hot chilly and 2 pinches sea salt with the pestle and add 1 egg yolk. Always with the pestle mix in 1 dl extra vergin olive oil, when thicks, put the safron and hot water in. At the and add 1 tbsp vinegar.
Put it on bruschetta (grilled bread) and if it's not an avoid, some gruyère
Eat with a fish or pumpikin soup.



Alia
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 15, 2007, 10:57pm; Reply: 11
yes, sounds very tasty!
Posted by: Lisalea, Wednesday, May 16, 2007, 2:19am; Reply: 12
Quoted from lola


now that one you will have to explain to me!! lol


Me too please !!!  ;) :)
Posted by: Laura P, Wednesday, May 16, 2007, 3:26am; Reply: 13
I make my own mayo constantly with egg yolk, lemon juice and olive oil
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, May 16, 2007, 4:51am; Reply: 14
I use canola oil in mine...I've not yet tried oo.
Posted by: 1005 (Guest), Wednesday, May 16, 2007, 10:07am; Reply: 15
Thank you so much everybody for all the recipes: can't wait to try making my own mayo. (dance)
I was really missing it...
:K)
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Thursday, May 17, 2007, 1:40pm; Reply: 16
Explanation

hehe..ok ok ! I will explain what I was writing about. I wasn't thinking of anything specific, but heating, baking, cooking, frying, changes the chemistry of the components.    

To give a good example, lets take tomatoes. When eating them in the raw state in salad or otherwise, most people can in fact cope with them allright, eventhough they are an avoid for most of us BT-wise. But when they are concentrated and made into puree or tomatopaste, they become more unhealthy and even more so if it is fried.

I have also learned about a resent experiment from USA with wheat bread. Most people are begining to recognise that wheat bread is not particularly healthy, although it is present everywhere in the food industry. The researchers said they found that baking wheat bread at really high temperatures for a small period, the vitamin content are boosted significantly. It also helps to extend the rising time.

You should also know for example that sprouting changes the chemistry of wheat, as Dr. D explains in more detail in the ER books.

See?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 17, 2007, 1:48pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Lasse
Explanation

hehe..ok ok ! I will explain what I was writing about. I wasn't thinking of anything specific, but heating, baking, cooking, frying, changes the chemistry of the components.    

To give a good example, lets take tomatoes. When eating them in the raw state in salad or otherwise, most people can in fact cope with them allright, eventhough they are an avoid for most of us BT-wise.  

That is not true for me or my sis another B
Raw tomatoes are worse for me than cooked or dry.
The only tomatoes I eat is a few sundried tomatoes once in a while like 1 each 3 months or so....
tomatoes ( avoid) and wheat( neutral) are even worse than just tomatoes on its own....
I dont know  why ?
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Thursday, May 17, 2007, 1:56pm; Reply: 18
I am going for my so hotty beloved *ailloly* ::) :B :X incl. bouillabaisse ;) ;D......sometimes :-/ (sunny)
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Thursday, May 17, 2007, 1:58pm; Reply: 19
Comment

Heating, cooking, baking, frying, sprouting and so forth, changes things. It becomes something else than just mixing seperate ingredients.

So at a basic level, you could not assume that if all the ingrediens are ok and fine in a raw state and seperated, it will be the same, when you mix them and process them. It all changes into something different.

Even when you are not processing foods, just mixing them will boost or inhibit diferent processes. Adding lemon to cooked spinach or collard greens, inhances your iron intake for example, while drinking tea on the side inhibits it.

So all in all, eating and putting together a perfect diet is quite chaotic (if not impossible) if you believes something like perfection excists in this wilderness of possibilities. Its nearly impossible to get any kind of overview.

The question here is, if the BT compatibility of food changes with processing like heating, cooking, baking, sprouting etc. too? In some cases it does. Dr. D has written about that elsewhere on this site. Check for example his notes about lectines during cooking and heating.

Quoted Text
Mixing beneficial and neutral foods, can sometimes make an avoid product, if it is heated to high temperaturees or cooked for a prolonged time.

...In the context of my explanation here, this undocumented statement might have been a confusing exaggeration, I see that now. Sorry if I scared anyone. :)

Hope this helps to clarify things.  
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Thursday, May 17, 2007, 2:00pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec

That is not true for me or my sis another B
Raw tomatoes are worse for me than cooked or dry.


Hi Henriette.

Yes perhaps for you, but I was referring to the BT point of view. Dr. D (or some other authority) have been writing about this somewhere on this site if you are interested.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, May 17, 2007, 3:04pm; Reply: 21
To be honest I don´t do tomates anymore it is not worth the hazzle -I feel it all the way from I eat it to it comes out again :-(- enough for me to avoid it and after all it is a red flag avoid no matter it´s state.
Posted by: 152 (Guest), Friday, May 18, 2007, 8:39pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Lasse
Are you an experimenting type or just curios, you could make your own mayo this way:

1 egg yolk (pasteuriced, no salmonella!)


Um....how do you pasteurize an egg yolk?  Sorry, am I missing something?

^_^
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, May 18, 2007, 10:06pm; Reply: 23
I believe some eggs can be purchased already pasteurized.

If one is concerned about using raw eggs in recipes, then I would highly favor purchasing organic, free range eggs.

Alia
Posted by: 1415 (Guest), Saturday, May 19, 2007, 7:47pm; Reply: 24
Hi.

I don't know how they pasterize eggs in the industry, someone else may have to answer that one Nameless.

And no Alia. Free range or organic eggs can be just as dangerous as eggs from ordinary industrialized chickenfarms. Perhaps the percentage of (salmonella) infected eggs is even higher, because some of the organic raised chickens is walking outdoors, where they are more exposed to both good and bad bacterias.

Most of the dangerous bacterias are in fact located outside on the egg-shells and the egg white or egg yolk will first become infected, when the egg is broken and the shell get into contact with the interiors.
  Therefore to disinfect an egg, you could put it into boiling water for a few seconds and it would kill everything. Then you can break the egg and do whatever you like with it. Some say 15 seconds in boiling water will eliminate everything, but I am not sure, so I use give it 30. But still this is not a 100% safe procedure. The safest way to eat eggs, is to buy pasteurized eggs.

There might of course be differences between different localities as to how alert one should be of getting the infamous Salmonella bacteria from eating raw eggs. But even though the percentage of infected eggs might be lower elsewhere, the possibility is still there. Getting infected with Salmonella can be a very serious affair, it could cripple you for life and in bad cases even kill you! So beware.

Here everyone knows of the risk of eating raw eggs and uncooked chicken. Strangely most other countries are more concerned with the Mad Cow disease, which is also a serious affair, but getting infected with Salmonella can be just as dangerous. The Mad Cow disease can be completely eliminated and reduced to zero risk, but Salmonella will always be with us, no matter how sterile and clean our chickenfarms are.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, May 20, 2007, 5:36am; Reply: 25
IF the egg is less than 24 hours= you get them from your own hens... the bacteria has NOT gone into the egg and you can dip the egg in boiling water.

I use my own eggs that way
- but IF I havn´t got any very fresh eggs I get the pasterized ones- however the taste is ......
or IF I cook something like an cake with uncooked chcocolatecream....

ABOUT organic vs caged / conventional eggs
IT Is NOT true about the percentence is higher at least not in Denmark.
Actually several surveys a few years ago- published in Politikens lørdagsliv:
showed that it was the cage produced eggs that had the higest ammounts of salmonella- due to animals being weaker-WHEN they got infected they couldn´t fight anything...- the least infected was from the organic or freerange. They were not without any salmonella - but the incident was much lower maybe due to stronger animals...
Just this month the same story about pigs - the organic ones on grass less salmonella:
http://www.okologi.dk/Nyheder/search-nyhed-detail.asp?gclid=CJaBuo%2DCnIwCFQ%5FalAodyUJl0Q&Id1=1742

NOW in Denmark really the risk of getting salmonella is very low due to the strickt programs...
SO don´t belive everything the government try to brain wash you into... ;-D

I have had listeria so I´m not a happy go easy fool......

I find it important to be carefull but there is no reason to be hysteric
Like some of my friends that always bake  cake with pasterised eggs and can´t understand why my cake taste better and is more raised.... welll fresh eggs .....

Posted by: Poly, Sunday, May 20, 2007, 8:50pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
SO don´t belive everything the government try to brain wash you into... ;-D


Well, I've been told the same thing as Lasse about free range eggs and salmonella, and it wasn't the government telling me - it was a report I read from Lanbohøjskolen aka Det Biovidenskabelige Fakultet aka Faculty of Life Sciences... *sigh - all those new names* ;D

When it comes to raw eggs I'm only chicken (hah hah) when it comes to serving them to others (if it's just for my own consumption, I'm not that thorough).
IF I serve something with raw eggs, I first clean the shell with alcohol and then dip the egg in boiling water for 10 sec. That should kill most bugs, I think... ;)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, May 21, 2007, 4:18pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from Poly


Well, I've been told the same thing as Lasse about free range eggs and salmonella, and it wasn't the government telling me - it was a report I read from Lanbohøjskolen aka Det Biovidenskabelige Fakultet aka Faculty of Life Sciences... *sigh - all those new names* ;D

When it comes to raw eggs I'm only chicken (hah hah) when it comes to serving them to others (if it's just for my own consumption, I'm not that thorough).
IF I serve something with raw eggs, I first clean the shell with alcohol and then dip the egg in boiling water for 10 sec. That should kill most bugs, I think... ;)


Well it was not the salmonella part I was refering to - more food politics in general....;-D

BUT interesting enought the test was published in Politiken 2 or 3 years ago made my fødevarestyrelsen...:-/
- and it showed more salmonella in the cage eggs than in the organic- and the organic was better than the normal free range

Well My chicks for sure a healthy - had them tested when I had them 2 years ago- and I have had plenty of raw eggs since so even if they had been infected since - I guess I would have known..
I just think that it is likely that smaller flocks will have less diseases so my 4 hens will be less sickly than a large flock...
Any way I use paterized(boring eggs) when I cook for a lot of people or havn´t any FRESH eggs
Posted by: Alia Vo, Monday, May 21, 2007, 11:31pm; Reply: 28
This topic of salmonella and eggs appears on the forum occasionally.

Thank you everyone for sharing your perspectives, past experiences, personal tips, and insight on this food safety topic.

Alia
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