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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Homemade cream cheese
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, May 7, 2007, 4:17pm
Well I guess this is mainly for the Bīs and ABīs  but
yesterday I went shopping and my favorite organic cream cheese was sold out.. and I donīt like the normal ones ....
what am a girl to do when she needs some ?
Make it yourself:
I remember watching a tv program showing how they did REAL organic cream cheese with nothing added and it was just drained sour cream or creme fraiseunder pressure

So I drained a tub of cream fraise ( 38 % fat ) last evening -almost no waste- added a touch of salt and it was really good.
I think next time Iīll do a mixture of 18 % and 38 % it was just a bit too fat for me and lacked the tang/acid that sour cream 18 % has.

AND the price was 50 % less than the shops version and it had no fillers- was not heated...
what can I say simply the best thing Iīve had lately on my rice cakes.
I used it in a carrotcake topping and it was perfect.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 7, 2007, 4:45pm; Reply: 1
nice!
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, May 7, 2007, 5:56pm; Reply: 2
I forgot:
For the american readers: look out for pure real sour cream/ creme frais with no fillers- just cream and culture.
Posted by: purlgirl, Monday, May 7, 2007, 7:16pm; Reply: 3
Haven't you noticed it's almost impossible to find anything PURE here in the USA.  Just finished reading how the Spelt flour has been fooled with too.  :'(
---
??? hope Lola comes by again.
I checked all my food list, inc Avoid list, and noticed Cream isn't on any list and not in the Typebase. I found Yogurt, and fresh made cheeses but no cream. Is it ok for A nonnies?
(pray)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 7, 2007, 7:54pm; Reply: 4
you rang? PG? I believe the only ones doing well with cream are the Bs......
;)
Posted by: Kristin, Monday, May 7, 2007, 8:29pm; Reply: 5
Yea Henriette!!!  :D  I'll have to try that... I am missing cream cheese for carrot cake.

Also, I think fresh goat's milk cheese... the soft variety... would also be a marvelous substitute for cream cheese... perhaps with a little goats milk added for creaminess. But a little more expensive than your version.  ;)



And Lola...  B's doing "well" with cream... depends on your definition of well!!! LOL!!!
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, May 7, 2007, 9:41pm; Reply: 6
You can also make a soft cream cheese from yogurt. You need a good quality plain whole milk yogurt--homemade works very well. Line a colander or sieve with two layers of cheesecloth, put the yogurt in, and cover the top with the ends of the cheese cloth. Let this drain in the sink for several hours or overnight. Eventually the yogurt will become concentrated and make a soft cheese that is a great spread. I used to make this all the time mixed with herbs like chives, garlic and basil--delicious with crackers or as a bagel schmeer, or a thick dip for raw veggies. :)
Posted by: eh, Monday, May 7, 2007, 11:50pm; Reply: 7
The drained yoghurt Brighid described is called labna (very common in Eastern Europe: Turks and Greeks make this all the time) . In fact, I think it makes the best tzatziki - much thicker and creamier than the undrained yoghurt. Just add some lemon juice and olive oil to the cucumber/garlic/labna mix to soften it and make it more 'dippy'. eh
Posted by: Lola, Monday, May 7, 2007, 11:52pm; Reply: 8
Germans and Austrians call it Quark.
Posted by: eh, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 12:13am; Reply: 9
Quoted from lola
Germans and Austrians call it Quark.


How do they usually eat it, Lola? Plain/herbed?
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 12:18am; Reply: 10
yes, and also they make quark pies and pastry.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 4:12am; Reply: 11
found this for a cream substitute
Quoted Text
SUBSTITUTE FOR CREAM
Take two or there whole eggs, beat them well up in a basin; then pour
boiling hot tea over them; pour it gradually to prevent curdling. It is
difficult from the taste to distinguish it from rich cream.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 4:38am; Reply: 12
kristin,
more compatible due to the sugar in dairy, that s the well I mean!!  lol
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 6:18am; Reply: 13
About quark
Quoted Text
Quark (or qvark) is a type of fresh cheese of Central European origin. Dictionaries usually translate it as curd cheese. It is white and unaged, similar to cream cheese, pot cheese, or ricotta. Because quark is consumed without aging, in the United States the milk must first be pasteurized. Once the milk is ready, lactic acid bacteria is created by adding starting culture. Acidification continues until the PH reaches 4.6, which causes precipitation of the casein proteins. Then a small amount of rennet) is added to make the curd firmer. Some or most of the whey is removed to standardize the quark to the desired thickness. Traditionally, this is done by hanging the cheese in loosely woven cotton gauze called cheesecloth and letting the whey drip off, which gives quark its distinctive shape of a wedge with rounded edges. In industrial production, however, cheese is separated from whey in a centrifuge and later formed into blocks.
Quark is usally sold in plastic tubs with most or all of the whey. This type of quark has the texture of sour cream and is often sold flavored with herbs, spices, or fruit.
Quark consists of 60% to 80% water. Dry mass ranges from 10% to 40% fat; most of the rest is protein, 80% of which is casein, calcium, and phosphate.


Iīm not a fan of it - here it is made by skimmed milk  and find it rather boring :-(
Drained yogurt on other hand is great both in tsasiki and even more drained - so you can form snall cheese balls- and roll them in fresh herbs.
I guess that would be a good way for the Aīs   :-/

prior to BTD I made this kind of yoghurt cheese all the time....
BUT I must admit that the extra fat in sour cream makes all the difference !
Especially important if you use the cream cheese in hot dishes- then I would go for the fatty version- so it doesnīt seperate.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 2:58pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Kristin
Also, I think fresh goat's milk cheese... the soft variety... would also be a marvelous substitute for cream cheese... perhaps with a little goats milk added for creaminess.


I often sub goat chevre for cream cheese; both in recipes like carrot cake or even cheese cake, or spread on toast (compliant grains only, of course!).
Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 9:30pm; Reply: 15
Yes--goat chevre is a terrific substitute for cow's milk cream cheese. In fact I like it better--to me commercial cream cheese is gummy and stale-tasting, while chevre is tangy, fresh and smooth. Makes a great topping for carrot cake with some vanilla powder and agave nectar! :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 9:36pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Brighid45
Y-to me commercial cream cheese is gummy and stale-tasting, while chevre is tangy, fresh and smooth.

I agree that is why I was so surprisedhow good homemade was.
The problem with mayority of creamcheese is that they are not made the old fashioned way- drained cultured cream ovr night- but added all kinds of fillers.

Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, May 8, 2007, 10:31pm; Reply: 17
Thank you for sharing your homemade cream cheese tip, Henriette Bsec.

Other compliant 'dairy products' could probably be used for those that can not consume cow dairy.

Alia
Posted by: 697 (Guest), Wednesday, June 20, 2007, 12:56pm; Reply: 18
Can As consume Quark?  It's really expensive where I live.

Sour cream is okay, correct?  Thanks!
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, June 20, 2007, 1:34pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from scout
Can As consume Quark?  It's really expensive where I live.

Sour cream is okay, correct?  Thanks!


Quark is neutral for both types of As, but sour cream without any avoids is neutral for A secretors and AVOID for A-nonnies.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, June 20, 2007, 5:41pm; Reply: 20
Thanks for that recipe, Henriette!  
I eat goat Chevrie now, and that's the only "cream cheese" that I have eaten for years, but I'm happy to have an alternative if I want to live on the wild side.  :-)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, June 20, 2007, 8:20pm; Reply: 21
;-D
Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, June 21, 2007, 2:27am; Reply: 22
Quoted from lola
Germans and Austrians call it Quark.


Yes, Isa loves her Quark. ;D

Debra :)

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, June 21, 2007, 5:24am; Reply: 23
;)
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