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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Rice flour cookies, yuckyyy!!
Posted by: 1062 (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:31pm
Hi everyone! Last night I decided to make my "O" son some cookies. He has been so good eating healthy the past month... So I made choco chip cookies with brown rice flour instead of the "bad" flour. OMG, they were horrible :o my poor son wanted to like them so badly that he still ate them! They had a "sand" texture.. they were just horrible.. What flour can I use to bake? I also want to make him banana bread and i have a feeling i won't be using brown rice flour ;D
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:36pm; Reply: 1
try mixing two or three beneficial or neutral grain flours......like soy and amaranth...etc
Posted by: 1062 (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:40pm; Reply: 2
thanks lola, will try ;D
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:44pm; Reply: 3
spelt cookies are sooo yummiciolous ;D :D
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:54pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from ISA-MANUELA
spelt cookies are sooo yummiciolous ;D :D


Would  u kindly post that recipe Tomatilla ?? ;-)

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 8:57pm; Reply: 5
have you checked recibase?
there are loads of cookie recipes that you can tweak.
Posted by: 296 (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 9:06pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from my3sons
They had a "sand" texture.. they were just horrible.. What flour can I use to bake?


Yeah: that's something you'll only ever do once, using just brown rice flour in a recipe.  I sympathize.  I remember when I did that some years ago, and the results were just plain awful.  You're sooooo right, the texture is like sand!  Blecch!

I'm a type O and am new to the BTD (less than a month), and am experimenting with various flour combinations, myself.  Spelt is so close to wheat and is supposed to be very tolerable by O secretors, so that might be a great choice for your son.  

Recently I discovered an O-compliant spelt cereal - not that I'm into eating cereal for breakfast anymore; not enough protein to keep me going - but I do keep it around for things like using it as part of a coating for baked fish or chicken, or for mixing it into a bowl of chopped apples, walnuts, and prunes, which you can serve either hot and yummy or cold and still yummy.

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 9:08pm; Reply: 7
can you give us the brand?
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 9:49pm; Reply: 8
merci bien Lola, pour le dépanage ;) ;D

ahem :B Lisalea...I buy them in a healthshop ::) :B  ;D ;D
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 9:57pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from LISALEA


Would  u kindly post that recipe Tomatilla ?? ;-)


When we use Spelt flour in quick bread/cookies, we substitute about 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 cups of spelt flour for every cup of wheat flour.
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:06pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from ISA-MANUELA
merci bien Lola, pour le dépanage ;) ;D

ahem :B Lisalea...I buy them in a healthshop ::) :B  ;D ;D


That's ok Tomatilla !!
I'll do as Lola suggested and tweak one of the cookie recipes on here Thank-u anyways  :) ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:07pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from ABJoe

When we use Spelt flour in quick bread/cookies, we substitute about 1 1/8 to 1 1/4 cups of spelt flour for every cup of wheat flour.

Thank-u for the tip ABJoe ;D :) ;)
Posted by: Ronagon (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:15pm; Reply: 12
I just made up a batter using quinoa flour, eggs, butter, and agave nectar.  I added a dash of molasses and ginger just to see what happens.  

I just a trial cookie in the oven.  Let's see what happens.
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:15pm; Reply: 13
Rice flour takes some getting used to. Both white and brown varieties can be gritty; white flour is less gritty than brown in my experience, but it's also somewhat higher on the glycemic index, and you don't get the benefit of the whole grain. At any rate, one of the ways to significantly reduce the grit factor is to soak the flour in whatever liquid is in the recipe.

When I make rice flour cookies, I mix the flour in with the eggs and vanilla extract and any other wet ingredients like agave nectar, chopped fruit, raisins, etc. and let it soak while I mix up the other dry ingredients.

For example, let's say you want to make the Toll House recipe for chocolate chip cookies. That recipe requires you to mix the flour and the baking soda, salt etc together. With rice flour, you do NOT do this. You add just the rice flour to the eggs, butter/ghee and vanilla extract and mix together until all the lumps are gone and the batter is smooth. You can add in the sweetener too. Then add the chips and nuts and finally, the baking soda and salt.

Please give rice flour another try. If you soak it, it will be a lot less gritty--honest! :)

p.s. Millet makes a good flour substitute also. I use it half and half with a good quality quinoa flour as a cornmeal substitute. You could also try amaranth flour.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:22pm; Reply: 14
Bri,
to the rescue always, with great tips!!
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:42pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Ronagon
I just made up a batter using quinoa flour, eggs, butter, and agave nectar.  I added a dash of molasses and ginger just to see what happens.  

I just a trial cookie in the oven.  Let's see what happens.


Please keep us posted !!  ;)
They sound really yummy and quite healthy !!  :D ;D :P ;) :)
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:50pm; Reply: 16
Thanks, Brighid!  I've been baking with rice flour going on 8 years now and I didn't know that about soaking the rice flour.  I'll try that.  I have noticed, like you posted above, that it's best to add the baking soda/powder right at the end (especially if you can't eat eggs) to give it the fluff.  Otherwise, all your fluff goes away leaving you with flat batter.  When I make muffins I add the rising agent just before pouring it into the tins and it fluffs in the tins instead of in the mixing bowl, and all eaters are happy.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, May 4, 2007, 12:17am; Reply: 17
I mix half sweet rice flour and half amaranth flour, and use that in a standard "toll house" cookie recipe... eggs and butter and all that good stuff... they're great.  sweet rice flour is fine, not sandy like rice flour, and the amaranth flour gives it some flavor and chewy texture and makes it brown - more like wheat flour.

Whenever I see a recipe that has rice flour as the only flour, I add at least some sweet rice flour.  It's too fine to cook with on it's own, but really smoothes out the texture of other gluten free flours.  If you can't find it at your health food store, try an asian market.  A brand name is mochiko, and it can also be called glutinous rice flour.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, May 4, 2007, 12:31am; Reply: 18
White or whole spelt performs like wheat for baking needs.  For other alternative flours, a combination of two or more might prove more helpful.  

I have heard that kamut flour works well for baking, as well.

Alia
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, May 4, 2007, 12:35am; Reply: 19
If possible, I encourage people interested in trying sweet rice flour/glutinous rice flour to purchase it at an Asian supermarket.  Asian food items are usually much less inexpensive than if the item(s) are purchased in a natural foods store.

Alia  
Posted by: Ribbit, Saturday, May 5, 2007, 2:01pm; Reply: 20
How much sweet rice flour do you mix with a cup of regular rice flour?  I find that the sweet rice flour is more like corn starch in its consistency and just gums up the batter.  Maybe I'm using too much.  I also tried mixing a little arrowroot in with regular rice flour but sometimes it makes it too gummy too.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Saturday, May 5, 2007, 10:56pm; Reply: 21
If I'm just using sweet rice flour and rice flour together, then I only use up to 1/3 sweet rice flour.  Too much sweet rice flour and it usually becomes too dense and mushy.  
Posted by: Alia Vo, Sunday, May 6, 2007, 3:42am; Reply: 22
Often, it takes a little experimenting per individual recipe.  Overusing sweet rice flour can produce a very chewy end product.

Alia
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