Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Muddled about beans!
Posted by: Joyce, Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 10:18am
Yesterday I bought a pack of flageolet beans [grown in France] which are pale green in colour.

I've been looking on Typebase4 and can't decide which they would be as so many seem to be family PHASEOLUS VULGARIS including ones which are avoids eg red kidney beans and some which are beneficials.  Is it the colour of these varieties of haricot beans that makes a difference?

Please can someone advise?

Thanks,
Joyce
Posted by: Brighid45, Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 10:50am; Reply: 1
Beans can be confusing. The green pod (often called green or string bean) is the immature form; the fresh shell bean (such as flageolet or haricot) is the intermediate form; and the dry bean (such as black or pinto) is the mature form. Different varieties are eaten as green, fresh shell or dry, and some varieties are eaten in all three stages.

Some bean varieties do have lectins. Since haricots appear not to have been tested specifically at this point, I believe you can consider them neutral.
Posted by: yaman, Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 11:15am; Reply: 2
Brighid,

Thank you for making it more clear.

Haricots verts are not neutral for me, I have to avoid them based on personal experience :)

However I'm quite happy with the green/string beans..

Cheers,
Yaman
Posted by: Joyce, Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 4:40pm; Reply: 3
Thanks Brighid.

Yaman, did you try raw jerusalem artichokes yet?

Joyce
Posted by: Brighid45, Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 9:17pm; Reply: 4
You're welcome, Joyce. :)

Haricots are apparently an avoid (or at least an infrequent neutral) for me also, Yaman. They give me indigestion and cause fatigue, so I just don't bother with them.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 12:09am; Reply: 5
string beans are haricots verts, right?
they are WONDERFUL with a little garlic and slivered almonds, sauteed in ghee.
this is Sarah s translation of haricots though...
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archived/config.pl?read=136453
NAVY BEAN
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?265

an O avoid for sure!
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 12:22am; Reply: 6
I'm confused where gigande beans fit in. I've been getting them pre-made at the deli counter at WF (when I'm out without other arrangements for food), but am not sure what they are related to. Apparently they are an heirloom bean, but that's all I could find out from a quick Google search.

Any ideas?
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 1:24am; Reply: 7
haven t heard of those....
no hits in the cooks thesaurus either
http://search.freefind.com/find.html?id=81296093&pageid=r&mode=ALL&n=0&query=gigande+beans
Posted by: Laura P, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 1:40am; Reply: 8
Quoted from outdoordrea
I'm confused where gigande beans fit in. I've been getting them pre-made at the deli counter at WF (when I'm out without other arrangements for food), but am not sure what they are related to. Apparently they are an heirloom bean, but that's all I could find out from a quick Google search.

Any ideas?


gigante bean?  or gigande bean, gigante would mean big or broad and would most likely be broad beans

Posted by: Drea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 4:12am; Reply: 9
WF sells them in the deli section (sometimes) and they are called gigande beans (with a d not a t). Apparently they come from Europe, are heirloom beans, and are related to white runners.  ??) They may be related to lima beans. :'(

Schluggell, where are you?

Posted by: yaman, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 6:22am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Joyce
Thanks Brighid.

Yaman, did you try raw jerusalem artichokes yet?

Joyce


Not yet Joyce, still waiting for the organic ones.

Cheers,
Yaman
Posted by: eh, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 6:29am; Reply: 11
You can also find canned gigantes in tomato sauce (from Europe). The Greeks, amongst others, love them. The Greek type I've found are neither broad beans nor lima beans; they are just extra large white beans.I'll need to check my next lot of cans but from memory I think one can listed them as big haricot and another as butter beans...not that helpful, eh?
Posted by: yaman, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 6:46am; Reply: 12
Quoted from eh
You can also find canned gigantes in tomato sauce (from Europe). The Greeks, amongst others, love them.


I can testify to that :) One of my favourite mezes at the Greek restaurants in Istanbul..

Don't know why, but some people here call them Bombai (Mumbai) beans ??)



Posted by: 1005 (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 9:44am; Reply: 13
Quoted Text
You can also find canned gigantes


Hi Eveyone!  The word "canned" caught my attention (and the fact that you're talking about beans: because of my blood type I've been trying to incorporate them into my diet).

Isn't canned food supposed to be bad for us?  Or are beans an exception?  It would certainly be much quicker if I just had to open a can of beans instead of having to soak them over night, etc, etc  ::)

(sunny)
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 12:42pm; Reply: 14
Hi Itita, nice to meet you :)

If you are buying canned beans, check the label--if the beans have nothing more than water and salt in with them, I'd say they're okay to use. Edenfoods makes terrific canned beans, very pure and excellent quality. They even make really yummy baked beans! We always have several cans of black and adzuki beans on hand in the cupboard for quick addition to recipes.

As for heirloom beans and varieties you can't find yet in Typebase--poor Dr. D would be spending all his time testing if he checked every single bean out there! ;) I would say, consider all untested beans neutral and go with guidelines for your type. If you are an O and beans are not a good source of protein for you, eat them sparingly. If you try a bean--in string, fresh shell or dry form--and it gives you grief, don't eat it again. Easy enough :)
Posted by: eh, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 12:49pm; Reply: 15
Itita,
Try to cook huge batches of your beneficial beans from scratch if you can find the variety you need in dried form. Then freeze them. Nobody here is recommending canned food above freshly cooked food, but sometimes cans may offer the only available beneficial beans. In my case, I can't always find the dried pinto which is a bene for my blood type but I can always find a can of the stuff. Always rinse the canned beans (unless they are sauced). That'll remove about 40% of the salt if they are packed in brine.
eh
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 6:31pm; Reply: 16
on beans and names
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/otd/archives/00000148.htm
Quoted Text
...you put haricot beans and butter beans in with green beans as I am fairly sure that haricot is the 'english' name for navy beans, and butter beans are also known as lima beans. There is quite a problem with different 'local' names for beans and fish,
Posted by: 1005 (Guest), Thursday, May 3, 2007, 7:53pm; Reply: 17
Brighid, Eh, thanks for the info!

I had never thought you could freeze beans, but I guess that is what they do with peas and green beans.

Any special guidelines about how to freeze them or is it just like freezing any other kind of food?  

Can you freeze lentils equally well?

How long will beans or lentils last in the freezer for (how many weeks)?

Sorry for all the questions... :B

BTW, great to meet you all!!  ;D
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 10:25pm; Reply: 18
One way is to freeze them after soaking but before cooking. They can keep up to 6 months in the freezer that way (or so I've been told).
Posted by: eh, Friday, May 4, 2007, 12:42am; Reply: 19
Itita,
Cooked beans, and especially lentils if they are cooked into dal, freeze beautifully. I don't like keeping anything flavoursome like a dal frozen for longer than about 6 weeks because the flavours do seem to deteriorate, even though the dish remains perfectly palatable.
eh
Posted by: 1005 (Guest), Friday, May 4, 2007, 10:40am; Reply: 20
Drea, Eh,

Thanks for the tip: it'll be great not to have to cook bean/lentils every other day from scratch (dance)
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, May 4, 2007, 2:16pm; Reply: 21
For once I am almost speachless:

"Bombay Beans" seems to refer predominately a Turkish thing - As my my Hindi friends keep asking "Which Bombay bean?"
In fact, what I can make out from the Turk is that these are what would be called Goober Peas in US (Peanuts).

AS for the 'Gigantes' without myself analyzing what you are using - could really be virtually anything.

Post a Picture...that may help.

But beans are all so interbred and the Latin is ambiguaous for the heirlooms who really knows.

Posted by: Drea, Friday, May 4, 2007, 2:29pm; Reply: 22
I cannot find any pics of the beans. I'm either going to save one and bring it home, or ask the deli help if they know the bean's origin. Each bean is cream-colored and is oblong in shape. The longest end is over 1" and the width is approx. 3/4".

Thanks for checking in, Schluggell.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, May 4, 2007, 2:47pm; Reply: 23
It sure sounds like fava beans Drea. Another name for fava beans is broadbeans.
Posted by: Drea, Friday, May 4, 2007, 3:20pm; Reply: 24
That would be swell, because favas are bennies for me. ;D
Posted by: Drea, Friday, May 4, 2007, 11:08pm; Reply: 25
I talked with the deli guy at WF and he told me that the gigande beans come from Greece and Spain and are closely related to butter beans, but not to lima or fava as most people suspect. Now to look up butter beans!
Posted by: Drea, Friday, May 4, 2007, 11:11pm; Reply: 26
I'm still confused because this site (CLICK) states that lima beans = butter beans.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 5, 2007, 1:42am; Reply: 27
the bean world sure is complex!
somewhat like the fish, one!!
different names depending on the country.
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, May 5, 2007, 4:33am; Reply: 28
Quoted from lola
the bean world sure is complex!
somewhat like the fish!!
different names depending on the country.


Annoying, isn't it?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 5, 2007, 5:38pm; Reply: 29
;)
Print page generated: Saturday, August 30, 2014, 6:34am