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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Having a hard time coping with change
Posted by: 971 (Guest), Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 3:15am
Hi Everyone,I thought pysching myself up about trying some red meat would help,so I started reading around the boards and speaking to my type O mother who eats red meat daily to feel good.I had my list in hand,was prepared to go and get what I needed until I got to the meat section of the store.The choices overwhelmed me,the site of the cut up meat and the thought of what the animal looked like before it was hacked up swamped me with guilt.I felt greedy piggish and hoardy.The vegan rants about meat consumption swimming around my head.I had no problem getting some skinless chicken breasts,but when I went for the red meat section I went into a full fledged panic attack,I was at whole foods and they are super expensive,but since I don't drive I cant afford the luxery of going all over town looking for better deals.Just the thought of eating conventional meat with all the hormones,preservatives and other unmentionables make me cringe But seriously 20.00 dollars for 3 chicken breasts! 10.00 dollars for organic beef patties.Then I saw small packages of ground lamb for only 3.39,I have never tasted lamb in my life,but I have read somewhere its an O beneficial so I bought it.I couldn't bring myself to get the beef,even though my body is craving it.I live with someone from India who is a pure vegetarian,they don't care if I cook the meat but I feel so uncomfortable doing that.I at one time also believed the cow is sacred,I feel like I am doing something dirty and shameful in front of them and I cannot help but feel that way.Anyway I bought lots of organic vegetables,and my grocery bill was TOO HIGH! The combination of all of these things caused me a panic attack,anyway i have this ground lamb in the fridge someone tell me how to cook it.
All of my emotions tells me meat eating is wrong,greedy and unintelligent,that eating meat will just cause me to be unclean or impure. Iam so upset from the price of the organic foods that I need because my system is so chemically sensitive.I have bills to pay :-(...Anyway, I'm so depressed after today....i have the lamb and I keep hearing that nursery ryme in my head and feel like im going to eat Mary's little lamb....and I have no idea how its supposed to smell or taste or even cooked..:-( Someone help me.  I've really flipped.  I'm second guessing and doubting myself again. I think I should just give up and stick to chicken!
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 4:33am; Reply: 1
living with that guilty feeling will only make you sick!

you need to convince yourself, that what you are doing is right......
and change whatever needs changing.
Posted by: eh, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 4:38am; Reply: 2
Tarrenae,

A short term solution would be to stop the escalation of your negative feelings about consuming meat. My advice is to stick that lamb in the freezer for now, then go away and calm down.

As for your vegetarian Indian friends. Believe them.
If the cow still feels sacred to you, don't eat it. Indians eat lamb and goat.

Only eat what you can eat. Don't force it. Seek out lamb recipes which use curry spices that mask the flavour of lamb, to begin with.

Finally, think about this and settle down: many cultures eat lamb for spiritual reasons. Stop indulging your guilt.

Take it easy on yourself, T.
eh
Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 5:04am; Reply: 3
Some people see new things with terror; others with anticipation.

While it may be right to be terrified of some unknowns, many have gone before you in this area and thrived. Change your mind, then change your habits one step at a time.
Posted by: 971 (Guest), Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 5:35am; Reply: 4
why am I so high strung? Is that an O thing?
Posted by: Elizabeth, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 2:37pm; Reply: 5
Many O's need a lot of exercise to burn off their adrenaline and keep their muscles happy.  This is not always easy if they work outside the home, as the saying goes.  If they don't get the chemical "flush" of hard exercise, they get very "stuck" and unhappy, depressed and anxious, just plain feeling that things are not right and not knowing why, so the brain looks for something to get upset about, however irrelevant to the overall scheme of things.  When I was younger, I thought that feeling was a signal to sit down, relax, and eat.  It isn't.  It is a signal to go do five loads of wash, scrub the floor, ride a horse seriously, go for a run if your knees allow--anything but sitting down.  And definitely don't eat.
Posted by: mikeo, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 6:22pm; Reply: 6
paradigm shifts are hard...but considering where u are right now...sounds like it's very necessary because your present paradigm is making you feel lousy...I think I answered your question already on another thread you started
Posted by: Poly, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 7:55pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Tarrenae
why am I so high strung? Is that an O thing?


No, it's a human thing! ;) Well it's true for some people at least! :D

Take it easy, let the lamb stay in the freezer for now, and when you're ready, ask your Mom or look up some yummy recipes on the internet. Don't cook the lamb right now, when you're under stress. Nothing good will come from it.
Posted by: Elizabeth, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 8:05pm; Reply: 8
Actually, once you get sorted out, as an O you are supposed to approach new foods with zest and curiosity!  Believe us, you will get there!
Posted by: koahiatamadl, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 8:06pm; Reply: 9
Ok, many meat eaters do not like to handle raw meat, my aunt won't cut up meat for stews nor will she mix burger mix with her hands - I can see how the sight of a lot of meat in a meat counter could cause problems for former vegetarians...

Could somebody else prepare a dish with red meat for you to start out with?  That would allow you to get used to the idea of eating meat and might also show you how your body benefits.  It may be easier to buy and prepare red meat as a second step...

As for lamb - it can be used much the same as beef.  However it has a distinct flavour and smell.  It goes well with strong spieces and flavours like garlic, rosemary, curry type dishes...you could make a burger mix with spices of your choice and a lot of garlic, shape patties and fry them...to be eaten hot or cold.   Alternatively you could shape meatballs, cook and eat it with some sauce.  

But if the thought of preparing the lamb makes you feel worse I would 2nd the freezer suggestion or else get somebody to cook it for you  :)  


Posted by: Joyce, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 9:36pm; Reply: 10
Tarrenae,

I don't know if this will help you in any way but I rear lambs, mostly to become breeding animals but those that don't make the grade go to our small local slaughterhouse, no market trauma involved.

Even as an A I do like the occasional bit of lamb myself and frequently cook it for my DH.

A fellow poster on a goat group wrote about her guilt at killing her male goat kids but then decided that to waste the meat was a worse crime than eating it and giving thanks to the animal for it's life-giving to her.

Some of us look at it as a 'deal' - we look after our animals as best and kindly as we can, even at death and they provide us with nourishment.

When you manage to get around to eating some meat do thank the animal instead of looking at it's gift with horror.

Wishing you great health!
Joyce
Posted by: Poly, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 9:43pm; Reply: 11
Beautifully put, Joyce! :)
Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, May 1, 2007, 11:00pm; Reply: 12
Here is what I would suggest to ease into eating meat. I've used this idea with other vegans or vegetarians and it often works well.

Make a batch of beef veggie soup. You don't have to put meat in it; just use some canned stock or broth at first, if that's all you can handle. That's fine. If you can't do straight beef broth, how about some vegetable broth or stock with a tablespoon or two of beef broth in it? Be gentle with yourself. Baby steps are okay.

To the broth add some onions, garlic, a bay leaf or two, and lots and lots of vegetables. Carrots, parsnips, turnips, sweet potatoes, green beans, peas, chopped collards or kale, okra, aduki beans, black-eyed peas . . . all kinds of veggies, cleaned and chopped if needed. Simmer very gently over low heat in a heavy pot on the stovetop for an hour or so (or cook for about 4-6 hours on the LOW setting of your slow cooker). Let this soup sit in the fridge overnight for the flavors to blend, then have a small cup for lunch or dinner the next day.

As you taste the soup, give thanks to the cow for the broth that sustains and nourishes you as an O. Honor that life. Do the same with the vegetables. Feel the chi of life entering your body through the soup. Take in health and healing. And enjoy the delicious flavor of the soup too! It's always rich and satisfying, and an easy way for your body to assimilate the benefits of the beef.

As for the ground lamb, I honestly don't think you're ready for it yet. Put it in the freezer and come back to it when you're used to having meat in your diet.  If you still want to give it a try, how about adding some browned lamb to rice pilaf? Throw in some cumin and a pinch of cayenne with grilled onions and a nice green salad on the side. You can add a very small amount of lamb to the rice and refrigerate or freeze the rest to use later.

Hang in there. Start small and gradually build up to the recommended portions of meat, take your time and if you need help or ideas, please ask :) Hope this helps.
Posted by: 971 (Guest), Wednesday, May 2, 2007, 10:07pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Brighid45
Here is what I would suggest to ease into eating meat. I've used this idea with other vegans or vegetarians and it often works well.

Make a batch of beef veggie soup. You don't have to put meat in it; just use some canned stock or broth at first, if that's all you can handle. That's fine. If you can't do straight beef broth, how about some vegetable broth or stock with a tablespoon or two of beef broth in it? Be gentle with yourself. Baby steps are okay.

To the broth add some onions, garlic, a bay leaf or two, and lots and lots of vegetables. Carrots, parsnips, turnips, sweet potatoes, green beans, peas, chopped collards or kale, okra, aduki beans, black-eyed peas . . . all kinds of veggies, cleaned and chopped if needed. Simmer very gently over low heat in a heavy pot on the stovetop for an hour or so (or cook for about 4-6 hours on the LOW setting of your slow cooker). Let this soup sit in the fridge overnight for the flavors to blend, then have a small cup for lunch or dinner the next day.

As you taste the soup, give thanks to the cow for the broth that sustains and nourishes you as an O. Honor that life. Do the same with the vegetables. Feel the chi of life entering your body through the soup. Take in health and healing. And enjoy the delicious flavor of the soup too! It's always rich and satisfying, and an easy way for your body to assimilate the benefits of the beef.

As for the ground lamb, I honestly don't think you're ready for it yet. Put it in the freezer and come back to it when you're used to having meat in your diet.  If you still want to give it a try, how about adding some browned lamb to rice pilaf? Throw in some cumin and a pinch of cayenne with grilled onions and a nice green salad on the side. You can add a very small amount of lamb to the rice and refrigerate or freeze the rest to use later.

Hang in there. Start small and gradually build up to the recommended portions of meat, take your time and if you need help or ideas, please ask :) Hope this helps.



great ideas! thanks
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 12:49pm; Reply: 14
You're welcome :) I know it can be tough to move from a vegetarian diet to eating meat. Take it one small step at a time and be gentle with yourself. Eventually you will find your tastes changing, I think.
Posted by: ruthie, Thursday, May 3, 2007, 1:50pm; Reply: 15
Dear Tar...Speaking of change...I feel for you.
I went from being a vegan to fish and chicken, and at my age it was no picnic.
At any age...a change is a change...we do not notice them when they occur gradually, and we change every day...day by day...but we do not notice this.
Perhaps gradual is your best bet...just an old gal's observation...
namaste
ruthie
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, May 4, 2007, 12:59am; Reply: 16
I would encourage you to pray about your situation.  

Please take one day at a time and remember to listen to that voice inside your body that tells you what it truly needs.

Alia
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, May 4, 2007, 2:39am; Reply: 17
Tar,

See if, over time, you can learn to distinguish your own inner voice from that of your vegetarian friends who have given you such a hard time.  It really is brainwashing, in a way, and it can take some time for their voices to fade so that your on thoughts can surface.  I was talking about another one of your threads with my husband the other day and he said, "Vegetarianism isn't just a way of eating for some people.  It's a religion."  So if it's that way for them, and if it was that way for you, just go run around the block a few times to get your cortisol levels back to normal and see what thoughts come to you then.  Does it really bother your conscience, or does it bother your friends' consciences, and you're just hearing their voices?  See if you can find another O buddy to start the diet with you and you can keep each other going.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to locate a farmer's market that has organic produce/meat for much cheaper than Whole Foods.  Sometimes whole foods has lists of local farmer's markets.
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, May 4, 2007, 3:50am; Reply: 18
Quoted from Ribbit
Tar,

See if, over time, you can learn to distinguish your own inner voice from that of your vegetarian friends who have given you such a hard time.  It really is brainwashing, in a way, and it can take some time for their voices to fade so that your on thoughts can surface.  I was talking about another one of your threads with my husband the other day and he said, "Vegetarianism isn't just a way of eating for some people.  It's a religion."  So if it's that way for them, and if it was that way for you, just go run around the block a few times to get your cortisol levels back to normal and see what thoughts come to you then.  Does it really bother your conscience, or does it bother your friends' consciences, and you're just hearing their voices?  See if you can find another O buddy to start the diet with you and you can keep each other going.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to locate a farmer's market that has organic produce/meat for much cheaper than Whole Foods.  Sometimes whole foods has lists of local farmer's markets.


Good ideas, Ribbit.

Tar,
Strength comes from respecting other's idea's, not from blindly following them. You will have areas of mutual agreement and disagreement with everyone.

Posted by: 971 (Guest), Friday, May 4, 2007, 2:42pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Ribbit
Tar,

See if, over time, you can learn to distinguish your own inner voice from that of your vegetarian friends who have given you such a hard time.  It really is brainwashing, in a way, and it can take some time for their voices to fade so that your on thoughts can surface.  I was talking about another one of your threads with my husband the other day and he said, "Vegetarianism isn't just a way of eating for some people.  It's a religion."  So if it's that way for them, and if it was that way for you, just go run around the block a few times to get your cortisol levels back to normal and see what thoughts come to you then.  Does it really bother your conscience, or does it bother your friends' consciences, and you're just hearing their voices?  See if you can find another O buddy to start the diet with you and you can keep each other going.

Depending on where you live, you may be able to locate a farmer's market that has organic produce/meat for much cheaper than Whole Foods.  Sometimes whole foods has lists of local farmer's markets.


That was some great advice!

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