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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Collard greens are so wonderful.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 1:23pm
Necessity is the mother of invention. I can't spend any money until payday, so I'm forced to eat healthy, homemade food! So, I went on a cooking spree last night and cooked up a bunch of stuff from the freezer. One thing that came out so fab and that I'm having for breakfast (which no one at work can figure out--if you eat anything for breakfast that doesn't fall within their narrow definition of "breakfast" foods, such as sugar, starch and caffeine, they don't get it and seem very thrown) as we speak is lamb chops with collard greens (beneficial, beneficial). I have finally figured out the elementary reality that one must add LIQUID when cooking collard greens, in order for them to turn out as fabulous as nature intended for them to. Unfortunately, I didn't have any stock or broth, because I think that would have been the ultimate. Chicken or turkey broth or stock I think would be just awesome. But any kind would work. Instead, I just used plain old water. I put a bag of frozen, chopped collard greens in a Pyrex casserole dish. I threw the defrosted lamp chops on top, drizzled just a tiny bit of olive oil onto the exposed greens, added some salt and this organic poultry seasoning that I find myself putting on everything since I discovered it this Thanksgiving, I may have put some verboten black pepper in, too (speaking of Thanksgiving, I'm still trying to get rid of this pepper I've had since then). Then I added some water until the casserole dish was about just under half full with liquid.

I covered the dish, put it into a slow oven set to 345, and left it for two hours or so.

omg! The lamb is falling off the bone and the collard greens are absolutely fabulous. I just packed it into individual serving Gladware containers and nuked it at work. I don't usually go for microwaving, but sometimes at work I will. Helps me fit in with the other humans.

Anyway, this is just the most delicious, nourishing thing EVER! And a side bonus is that it freaks out a certain co-worker who is easily freaked out and who I am currently in a huge snit at--muah! She is an ESTJ and can't stand anything that isn't traditional and "normal". No offense to all you great ESTJs out there, but she happens to be a weeniebutt version. Anyway, our two personalities just CLASH. I happen to know she thinks collard greens are, quote "disgusting", so I am sure to fan a bunch of the steam over her way. *tee hee*

Anyway, if you want a nourishing, DELICIOUS true breakfast of champions that also freaks out people who can't think outside the box, you'll want to try this. Kick it up by using broth instead of water.

Today is my dog's eleventh b-day. I'm saving the little marrow bone for her. It's her fave.

I love being an O.
Posted by: Mitchie, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 1:56pm; Reply: 1
Oh Peppermint, with you liking leftover dinner for breakfast we certainly must be culinary sisters.

Although I'm not doing it now, my fave breakfast was always something like meatloaf and mashed pots with gravy or pot roast, carrots and onions. And having the extra benefit of flipping out your coworkers is just a bonus and wickedly funny. ;D

My coworkers have long gotten over my weird breakfast habits but in the past would practically barf as I was eating maybe leftover chicken and veggies while, as you say, they are eating a nutritious meal of Krispy Kremes or even the ultimate in breakfast dining, the vending machine fake giant cinnamon roll monstrosity.

Eat on, girl and enjoy your chops and collards any ole time! I'm with ya in spirit! (smarty)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 2:03pm; Reply: 2
;D
Actually, I think the ultimate "breakfast" now is a Starbucks type of "coffee".  I put coffee in quotation marks because any sane person could surely detect that it really isn't a coffee at all, but a highly-caffeinated dessert.  Yet those same people who eat cereal for breakfast that is pure sugar and Starbucks coffee that is pure sugar + caffeine and donuts which are pure sugar, think it is strange to have something like lamp chops and collard greens for breakfast.  Hey, it's got high-quality protein, greens with vitamins, etc.  What is in your "coffee"?  The four basic food groups of sugar, caffeine, corn syrup and transfat?  I'm only surprised they don't find a way to add wheat starch to a Starbucks coffee.  Then you'd really have a complete and balanced meal.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 3:36pm; Reply: 3
My favorite breakfast is some form of turkey, fresh ginger, and greens. Often, it's turkey kielbasa sauteed in ghee with broccoli florets, or lacinato kale strips, or collard strips. Sometimes I mix it up and use tofu/tempeh instead of turkey. I feel best on this type of meal to start my day. Collards are good any old time.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:28pm; Reply: 4
I didn't have collards (or any veggies) for breakfast, but this thread made me want some. So I made a quick batch of braised collards with garlic for a mid-morning snack. Yum! I'm one of those people who likes their collards cooked hot and quick, which works well if you slice them into very thin ribbons. A splash of lemon juice and a dash of salt and away they went.
Posted by: BuzyBee, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:36pm; Reply: 5
I need to try you way of cooking collards because my last experience took forever. I used fresh collards from produce and cooked in the crock pot for 10 hrs. My questions to you are: How much water, stock, or broth did you use. Did the liquid completely cover the collards. What was the size of your pyrex dish. And you say 354 for 2 hrs.
Posted by: lstreat, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 6:49pm; Reply: 6
I think it's becoming the norm lately to have dinner for breakfast and breakfast for dinner. Make your main meal your breakfast and it makes sense when you think about the fasting we are all doing while we sleep. And I love collards since this board turn me onto them. Never thought much about them before but I buy a bunch every week now. I just boil them down not for very long maybe 10-15 min, sprikle with some olive oil and sea salt maybe a splash of lemon and yummmy!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 7:11pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from BuzyBee
I need to try you way of cooking collards because my last experience took forever. I used fresh collards from produce and cooked in the crock pot for 10 hrs. My questions to you are: How much water, stock, or broth did you use. Did the liquid completely cover the collards. What was the size of your pyrex dish. And you say 354 for 2 hrs.

Well, I never measure anything, so this is all approximate, but what I used was a bag of frozen, chopped collard greens (which now I'm sold on, the heck with the fresh ones, these are so much easier to work with/more convenient, imho). I put those into the bottom of a round, Pyrex casserole dish (not sure of the size, seemed pretty "regular" to me...oh dear, I'm so bad at recipes *lol*). I placed the raw lamb shoulder chops on top of the collards. I then drizzled just a smidge of olive oil on the exposed collards, not too much, because I know that lamb has a lot of fat that will cook down into the greens, giving them a lovely richness. I then added the seasonings I described, and then some plain tap water, although I think broth would have kicked it to notches unknown. However, it came out wonderfully using the water, as all the flavors of the collards and lamb and seasonings cooked into the remaining water that didn't absorb into the collards. Most of the water absorbed in, leaving just a slight bit at the bottom, which was great to put into the single-serving Gladware containers to act as a moistening, flavorful wondrousness factor when reheating. The amount of water did not cover the collard greens, it only went about halfway up the collard greens, so maybe when I said it filled about half the casserole dish, that wasn't right--maybe it was more like one third of the casserole dish. And remember, that is WITH all the ingredients already in there, too.

The point is to add enough so that the collard greens can absorb it while they cook, and also to provide steam in the pot so that they do not dry out, as you are slow-cooking them, so they will be in there for a while. The temperature was 345 for two hours.

Posted by: BuzyBee, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 7:20pm; Reply: 8
I am going to try this because 10 hrs is way to long unless you throw everything in the crockpot first thing in the morning and then it is ready for dinner. I think I have a package of frozen chopped collards in my freezer I may just try it tonight for dinner. I have a frozen turkey leg I can throw in also to season. Thanks for the idea.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 7:33pm; Reply: 9
The turkey leg will be excellent, and probably the ideal thing for you to use, as an A. Just put enough water in to go halfway up the collard greens (add it at the end, after all the ingredients). Put the meat on top of the collard greens. Feel free to add seasonings and also any other veggies you like, such as carrots (they won't have any beta carotene left by the time they cook for two hours *lol*, but they will still taste good and look puuuurty), onions, etc. Garlic would be GREAT. I was going to put in a head of garlic, but it had sprouted roots and gone all funky on me on the inside, so I tossed it out. Mine turned out soooooooooo delectable anyway.

Yay, BTD! :D

edited to add:  if you have broth or stock to put in there instead of, or instead of part of, the water, that would certainly take it to the next dimension.  But the remaining water when all was said and done in mine was so delicious that I consumed what there was of it in my Gladware serving from today.  It had cooked down and absorbed all the flavors, and was like a broth, ummmmmm.  UMMMM!

Yeah, babe.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 9:45pm; Reply: 10
Hey Twisty and all. Just got back from my seminar out of town. Food was hit or miss but I managed to avoid the deadly six for Bnons while eating out. At Macaroni Grill last night they gave me hell about eating goat a$$(transferred contents of my freezer to office freezer during Katrina). The people were ESTJ type A, ISTJ type O, and ENTJ type unknown. The ISTJ was grossed out because I mentioned that I wished they served lamb and his vegetarian wife(likely a type A) drinks goat milk. All the while he was eating white bread though he at least had a steak/ceasar salad. The A btw had salmon and rice pilaf.
Posted by: BuzyBee, Monday, April 9, 2007, 4:04pm; Reply: 11
Well this weekend I was finally able to try the collard baking dish. I put a 16 oz bag of frozen chopped collards with water 1/2 way and layed a frozen turkey leg on top. I added some frozen chopped onion, spices and olive oil on top of turkey. Put the lid on and baked for 2 hrs at 350.  Turned out great. The turkey flavored the collards so they didn't have the strong taste most of the time associated w/collards.

I was pleased with the outcome. I think this should be in the recipe section so I will add.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, April 9, 2007, 4:09pm; Reply: 12
Yay, your version sounds delish, BuzyBee!
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, April 9, 2007, 9:29pm; Reply: 13
All I can say is . . . yummm!!! :) Excellent recipes, please post them in the recipe section!
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Monday, April 9, 2007, 10:53pm; Reply: 14
What do collard greens taste like?
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 12:15am; Reply: 15
FM,
I'll let someone else answer that question.  I just like them!

My favorite health food store is selling Collard Rabe and Kale Rabe.  I've never seen these before.  It's evidently the tops that have begun to flower, and they have harvested them before they got into full flower.  They contain small tender leaves and tight little flowers.  Quite nice steamed with red onion and served with olive oil.
Posted by: Jill N, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 12:21am; Reply: 16
Peppermint Twist - Thanks sooo much for sharing your recipe and your wonderfully descriptive written account of the making and enjoying of it!!!   ;D  I love the bit about the co-worker!!  Collards are the next thing I want to learn to make, so I appreciate the information from everyone!  

Before BTD I didn't realize what wonderful foods I was missing out on thinking I didn't like them (namely Kale).  I'm looking forward to discovering new loves thanks to the inspiration provided by my fellow BTD'ers!!

Thanks everybody!!!  (clap)
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 1:28pm; Reply: 17
I gotta boil collards at least 2 hours.  (Put plenty of water & watch them! Boil water first.) They cook faster if you cut them in ribbons across the stem.  My Greek husband likes them with lemon & olive oil.  They are a regular around here.  I still get lazy about cleaning them. Maybe is is good to cook a batch when you have time & eat them for a few days.
They have an unusual taste, but we like them.
Sea Salt & Light,
Mrs "T"    O+
Posted by: BuzyBee, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 5:09pm; Reply: 18
Quoted Text
Posted by: funkymuse       Date Posted: April 9th, 2007, 10:53pm
What do collard greens taste like?


They can have a very strong taste but if you cook them slow and season them well they are very delicious. Some people have to acquire a taste for them. In the south most people season them with ham hock or ribs but I have found that turkey is a great seasoning and better for you. They are cooked different by each individual.

Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 10:27pm; Reply: 19
What do collards taste like? To me they are a bit like cabbage, a bit like broccoli, but milder than both. Long cooking works well with collards--it makes their calcium content more accessible and also mellows them out. Cooking with turkey, beef, or lamb and allowing the fat to penetrate and soften the greens makes them even better! A pot roast braising atop a pile of collards and sweet potatoes or peeled, seeded and cubed winter squash with onions, garlic and olive oil . . . delicious! :)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 1:53pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Jill_Owen
Peppermint Twist - Thanks sooo much for sharing your recipe and your wonderfully descriptive written account of the making and enjoying of it!!! ...Before BTD I didn't realize what wonderful foods I was missing out on thinking I didn't like them (namely Kale).

Isn't kale just wonderful? I first had it at a potluck dinner at church as a kid. We were doing a "learn about each other/get to know you" thing with a predominantly African-American church from downtown Washington, DC. We were a predominantly white church from the Maryland suburbs. Anyway, as I recall, they came to our church with all this wonderful "soul food" for a potluck dinner and that was the first time I ever tasted kale. And it is now a family legend how little Edna just went nuts for this and kept asking my mom for WEEKS after that "Can we have kale? Can we have kale?" Finally, she must have made me some kale *lol*. See, this is how you know I was a weird kid.  Most kids would be asking for chocolate cake or Twinkies, but what do I ask for?  Kale!  It was just so great and the whole experience was great, too, because at that time there was so much more of a separation between black people and white people, so even those of us who were not prejudiced against "the other" really didn't get that much of an opportunity to interact and get to know each other. That potluck was a long time ago but I still remember the warm feeling in the air and, even though I didn't know a lot about prejudice or the history of racial separation in this country, even as a kid I could tell that there was something special about that night and what was going on. But mostly I remember the kale *lol*!!!!

Posted by: ion, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 6:46am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Mrs_T_O+
My Greek husband likes them with lemon & olive oil. They are a regular around here. Sea Salt & Light,
Mrs "T" O+


Hi Mrs T0+
I am glad you have a greek husband (hope you are too) :)
Would you please ask me what is the greek word for Collards?
I am trying so long time to solve this problem out and I would be happy to find out what is all about.
Thanks. Ion

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 8:23am; Reply: 22
Quoted from ion_amygdalou


Would you please ask me what is the greek word for Collards?
I am trying so long time to solve this problem out and I would be happy to find out what is all about.
Thanks. Ion


Ion try to look here- maybe it will help you :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collard_greens
http://www.foodlexicon.net/coll.htm
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 1:27pm; Reply: 23
My hubby calls them 'black cabbage' or mavro lahano/lahana(plural).
They are in the cabbage family, so that makes sense.

Mrs "T"   O+
Posted by: ion, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 3:13pm; Reply: 24
Thank you both.
Henriette, unfortunately no greek translation into those two sites. pitty.

Mrs 0+ thanks for responding but black cabbage does not ring the bell.
I suspect which ones could be, but I am not sure if it is kale or collard.
Does the word seskoulo, or tsimoulia means anything to your husband?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 3:20pm; Reply: 25
What abot this - it wont let me write the gree letters :-)
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/915968
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Thursday, April 12, 2007, 9:36pm; Reply: 26
The second word was lahanides, which I think would mean 'cabbage style' or 'like cabbage' .....  I don't recognize the first word.
Lahano is cabbage (singular) lahana (plural)
My, aren't we some Greek scholars here!!??

It still tastes good.

Sea Salt & Light,
Mrs "T"    O+
Posted by: ion, Friday, April 13, 2007, 7:38pm; Reply: 27
Hi Henriette. Grate contact with languishes.
The last site may get me somewhere. All of them are very interesting. thanks a lot.

Mrs 0+ thank you too. I am sure soon i'll come up with a result.
I bet they do taste good.
kalimera kai efxaristo
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, April 14, 2007, 6:50am; Reply: 28
You are welcome .
Never seen them here in Denmark- we do mostly curly  kale in winter...
Posted by: Possum, Monday, January 30, 2012, 1:06am; Reply: 29
So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli ;) They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some :) Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me... :-/
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, January 30, 2012, 1:42am; Reply: 30
Quoted from Possum
So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli ;) They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some :) Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me... :-/


Here is a link from a seed company. When I went GTD I lost collards but I used to like to plant the Green Glaze variety.

http://www.southernexposure.com/greens-collards-c-3_30_100.html
Posted by: Possum, Monday, January 30, 2012, 2:17am; Reply: 31
Thanks GCG but they only list greens?! I am also wondering re them being from the brassica family?!
Posted by: Possum, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:02am; Reply: 32
Just did a search on the Main Forum Page under Eat Right & it seems there is not only no name for these in NZ/Australia, but they can't even be bought? Any more opinions from people "downunder" on here?
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:11am; Reply: 33
Quoted from Possum
So what are chollard greens in NZ?Aus? I know they are between kale & cabbage & associated with broccoli - they look just like the tops of broccoli ;) They are the highest thing next to kale itself in Vit K & I would love to get me some :) Not sure,  being from the brassica family tho', exactly how they will like me... :-/


Here's an image page for collard...Perhaps something will look familiar to you :)

http://www.google.com/search?q=collard+greens&hl=en&prmd=imvnse&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=SBgmT6e8NqXs0gHfkf27Cw&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&ved=0CBYQ_AUoAQ&biw=1780&bih=1064

Posted by: Spring, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:16am; Reply: 34
Quoted from Chloe

:D :o Those cooked ones are a bit much to take unless you are already hooked on these things - which I most certainly am! They are addictive!! And I'm serious. If my oldest son and a friend from New York could get addicted, I think anyone could eventually.
Posted by: Possum, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:23am; Reply: 35
Thanks but no nothing like that here :-/ ;)
Posted by: Spring, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:33am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Possum
Thanks but no nothing like that here :-/ ;)


I wonder if you could import the seed. A lot of these greens can be grown in large pots. They are easy to grow - similar to growing grass! The young, tender plants are sooo good! And even the "flowers" are delicious! The best part in my opinion.(smile)
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, January 30, 2012, 4:41am; Reply: 37
Quoted from Possum
It seems there is not only no name for these(collard greens) in NZ/Australia, but they can't even be bought? Any more opinions from people "downunder" on here?

By looking in Wikipedia, I found this is the family, etc. for Collard greens:
Brassica oleracea Acephala Group – kale and collard greens - Acephala means "headless".

I just looked at this seed com. website in NZ:
http://www.egmontseedsshop.co.nz/prestashop/

I searched through the vegetable listings for leafy cabbage plants and found:
Borecole and Kailaan which are both headless plant in the Brassica oleracea family.  These are the closest this company has to collard greens...

Komatsuma, Misome, and Tatsoi are headless Brassica campestris (according to the Egmont site) which are other headless cabbage family plants.

I would try to find some of these as substitutes for collard greens.  If all else fails, at least you have a source for seed. ;)   ;D
Posted by: Possum, Monday, January 30, 2012, 5:29am; Reply: 38
Thanks ABJoe ;)
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Monday, January 30, 2012, 5:11pm; Reply: 39
I use them as a wrap instead of a tortilla and I also blend them raw with mango
Posted by: san j, Monday, January 30, 2012, 6:14pm; Reply: 40
Whole Foods Market used to feature a Collard Slaw at its salad bar.
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, January 30, 2012, 11:39pm; Reply: 41
StarPine, I do the same thing using collard leaves as wraps. Cook them until they're pliable and soft but not too soft, then fill them with anything you can think of. My favorite: browned ground lamb/turkey/lean beef and grilled vegetables or caramelized onions with some hot sauce. So good!
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 1:10am; Reply: 42
Just skimmed this thread. I'm surprised so many people boil them for so long! I saute them for about 5 minutes max. They have become my new fav. since they are cheaper than swiss chard and not as bitter. Just had some in some turkey soup, yum.
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 3:37am; Reply: 43
Waahh & I can't get any :'( ::)
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Thursday, February 2, 2012, 11:57pm; Reply: 44
Quoted from Brighid45
StarPine, I do the same thing using collard leaves as wraps. Cook them until they're pliable and soft but not too soft, then fill them with anything you can think of. My favorite: browned ground lamb/turkey/lean beef and grilled vegetables or caramelized onions with some hot sauce. So good!


Wow that sounds good, except for the lamb part... :)
Posted by: O in Virginia, Friday, February 3, 2012, 1:45am; Reply: 45
I have childhood memories of stinky horrible collard greens, but I just bought a bunch at Whole Foods because they are a diamond.  I thought I'd try them in turkey broth for soup.  I love to eat my greens in soups.  I hope they aren't stinky and gross.  I'm sure they'll be great with fresh ginger & onion, etc. and not cooked to death.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:13am; Reply: 46
You'll be addicted in no time, O in V!  :D
Posted by: Drea, Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:58am; Reply: 47
Collards are one my most favorite greens; and they are also the least expensive, even organic. The trick (in my opinion) is to slice them in very thin ribbons and saute them in a bit of (olive) oil just until bright green and slightly softened. Not slimy, just delicious.
Posted by: 14922 (Guest), Friday, February 3, 2012, 3:59pm; Reply: 48
I also read where you can make sauerkraut using collards instead of cabbage.

I wish someone would sell it! I want to try it but don't want to make it.
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