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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Creative veggies
Posted by: Connect, Monday, April 2, 2007, 5:20pm
I need new and innovative ways to get more veggies in my diet.  I know all of the typical things:  add them to omelettes, etc...

What are some creative ways that you get more veggies in your diet?  I'm constantly on the run, so things I can take with me would be great!

Thanks!!
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Monday, April 2, 2007, 5:32pm; Reply: 1
For me, for a "quick" raw salad, I shred my veggies, like beets, cucumber, carrots.  I found it takes less time to chew them up and to me they are a bit tastier.   Today I made a salad for lunch using spinach for my base instead of lettuce, since I am intollerant to lettuce for now.  It was a sweet tasting salad.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, April 2, 2007, 6:42pm; Reply: 2
stirfries always turn out right!
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 2:20am; Reply: 3
Fresh salads--especially with the warm weather ahead of us.  Experiment with new sald greens to spice things up.  I hardly ever use green romaine lettuce as a base now, instead, I favor escaole, various varieties of chard, red romaine, spinach.

Consider tossing in a vegetable into the salad that one would not typically think of contributing to a salad.  I have used sliced raw beets in salads, sliced raw jicama slices, parsnips slices, diced turnips, brocolli flowettes, brocolli stems, cauliflower flowerettes, flat leaf parsley, cilantro, et al.

You can use various vegetables to create different flavors and textures every day.  Add condiments such as various seaweeds, spices, nutritional yeast to add texture, nutrition, and flavor.

Experiment with vegetables to roast, steam, water saute, bake, and grill them to add different culinary experiences to your palate.


Alia
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 12:00pm; Reply: 4
I've made cole slaw using broccoli stems in place of cabbage, a little carrot, maybe mix in a handful of raisins.  I don't use dressing in this cole slaw since my hubby can't handle the mayo.
Posted by: Ben_Lamers (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 1:13pm; Reply: 5
how about juicing veggies. i got the jack lalane power juicer works great. some vegetables dont taste good but carrots,spinach,parsley are doable. of course if u dont care how they taste u can down it really quick it doesnt taste good but its perfectly fast. i mean super fast.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 3:41pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Cathy
I've made cole slaw using broccoli stems in place of cabbage, a little carrot, maybe mix in a handful of raisins.  I don't use dressing in this cole slaw since my hubby can't handle the mayo.


My favorite dressing for this kind of dish is evoo or walnut oil, fresh squeezed lemon or lime juice, and a splash of agave nectar (I like the tart/sweet taste). No mayo here! You can also add shredded kale or kohlrabi or turnips to the slaw.
Posted by: Connect, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 4:44pm; Reply: 7
Thanks for the suggestions.  
Juicing is a good idea....and fast.

I don't have a problem getting a variety in....I have a problem eating enough in a day.  I am a wiz at salads, stirfrys, etc....but I am trying to figure out "snack" vegetables.  

Like, does anyone ever make baked veggie "chips?"  What are some of the ways you eat vegetables outside of main meals?
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:10pm; Reply: 8
I just whipped up a batch of collards with some garlic for my snack. I'm one of those people who like my collards sauteed on high heat on the stove - 5-8 minutes, if you slice them into thin ribbons.

Another way to eat root veggies is to bake them into "fries". I tried to make dehydrated zuchini chips once, but cut them *way* too thin. Veggies on the go are hard unless you like to eat them raw; then bring along some compliant hummus as a dip. One of my all time favs for taking on the road is broccoli stem/shredded kale salad with evoo, lemon juice, and agave to taste. It keeps without being refridgerated, and is so beneficial and tasty.

I finally found the Terra Brand Parsnip Chips that Peppermint Twist posted about on another thread. They aren't bad, but I wouldn't want to eat them on a regular basis - too greasy.
Posted by: 476 (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:13pm; Reply: 9
We make baked veggie chips and they are great. I use a Benriner slicer thats very sharp, I know because I cut my finger on it. My family usually does squash, sweet potatos, parsnips, or other root veggies.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:20pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from JamieB
We make baked veggie chips and they are great. I use a Benriner slicer thats very sharp, I know because I cut my finger on it. My family usually does squash, sweet potatos, parsnips, or other root veggies.


What temperature oven do you use?

Another question: when slicing squash like butternut (those with a very hard skin), do you have a method by which to peel before slicing? I have a lovely butternut squash that I want to make into "fries" but hate the peeling process.
Posted by: BuzyBee, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 5:30pm; Reply: 11
I keep seeing evoo pop up. What is this? What do you do with it? Thanks
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 6:14pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Ben_Lamers
how about juicing veggies. i got the jack lalane power juicer works great. some vegetables dont taste good but carrots,spinach,parsley are doable. of course if u dont care how they taste u can down it really quick it doesnt taste good but its perfectly fast. i mean super fast.


I just made up some veggie juice and I add a slice of pineapple.  That was tasty!!  ;D
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 6:31pm; Reply: 13
evoo is extra virgin olive oil!
Jane
Posted by: 803 (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 8:37pm; Reply: 14
I am also always out and about (the life of a university student :|), and I usually cut harder vegetables into sticks and snack on them during classes. Kohlrabi, carrots, celery, cucumbers and such are especially good, since they don't get mushy during the day (although I always have the cucumbers first). Broccoli stalks also work well. Also, try adding vegetables to your sandwiches, if you have some made from compliant breads. I also have fresh made tahini a lot (my husband makes it great): what we call here raw tahini, which is a sesame seed paste, fresh garlic, fresh parsley, fresh coriander, lemon juice, olive oil, cumin, and some salt and pepper. You will also need to thin it out with water.
Posted by: 476 (Guest), Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 8:46pm; Reply: 15
I guess you could do it at about 400 degrees. Till there done. I always leave the skin on, almost always its tender enough to eat so I always eat it. I think its healthier too. It sure makes making squash alot easier to not have to take the skin off.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, April 3, 2007, 11:07pm; Reply: 16
I made some parsnip chips today, although I would hardly call them crispy. They were tasty, though. I sliced them in the food processor, tossed with oil and a bit of salt, then baked them for 30 minutes at 350 or so...it's hard to tell with my oven. It's a convection oven, but the temp on the display is usually way off from the thermometer inside the oven.

I also hunkered down and peeled the squash...which wasn't as difficult as I remembered. That I sliced into 1/2" strips and baked the same way.
Posted by: Connect, Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 12:07am; Reply: 17
I attempted to make veggie chips the other day out of squash.  I think I sliced them way too thin, as well.  I sliced them, tossed them in EVOO with some salt...then baked on 400 for about 30 minutes.  They came out black and completely burnt!  I tried again on 325 for 30 minutes....and they just weren't crispy.

I don't know how to make them crispy...
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 4:53am; Reply: 18
I haven't been able to make mine crispy, either; but they do taste good. I'm thinking the only way to make them crispy is to either: dehydrate or deep fry. If there's anyone out there who has a better idea on how to make homemade veggie chips crispy, speak up!  ;D
Posted by: eh, Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 6:08am; Reply: 19
Crisping usually requires 'twice cooking', especially if you are deep frying! The best chips are made by deep frying until just cooked, draining off the fat  and then allowing the chips to cool. Once cooled, deep fry them again until they crisp up. I know it seems labour intensive but it's really, really worth it. I should  add - as an AB of course -  that potato chips  are best cooked this way. In the case of As, you could try first frying/parboiling your parsnip chips and then cooling them before crisping them in a hot oven.  
eh
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 8:15am; Reply: 20
sounds yummiciolous .......have to give a try........or please send some :o ........:D
Posted by: 476 (Guest), Wednesday, April 4, 2007, 8:24pm; Reply: 21
I dont think you can really get chips crispy in the oven, ours are never really crispy and we still enjoy them just the same. I suppose you would have to deep fry like other people have suggested to get crispy chips, but remember that in one of the books, Cook Right for your Type?, Dr. D recommended that deep fried anything should be avoided. If you are trying to get something crunchy or chewy for snaking you could try dehydrating various veggies that are sliced. I would love to try that but cant afford a dehydrator right now. Im sure some one has experimented with this and can give some pointers.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, April 5, 2007, 3:47am; Reply: 22
Quoted from connect14
What are some of the ways you eat vegetables outside of main meals?


I try to make sure I always have some form of raw crudites on hand: carrots, celery, root vegetables to snack on.  I like to eat all of these plain with no added dressing or dip.


Alia
Posted by: 320 (Guest), Monday, April 9, 2007, 11:41pm; Reply: 23
Just looking thru the creative veggies postings --- I've seen a few mentions about using the juicer.  Disclaimer here: I'm no guru, expert, or pontificator!  I'm a mere mortal like the kind of people usually attracted to the BTD work.  I seek to continue with the BTD work in my own life (of 58+ years), and to relate it together with the input I've gained over 40 years with bio-dynamics, and BD's dear relative, organic gardening/agriculture.

That 'disclaimed', my concern is this, with the following heartfelt explanation:  I've stepped away from juicing some years ago, having read that the living vitality of the veg or fruit you select is a VERY significant health factor.  Commonly, we say that we are closer to our aim, that of enhancing our personal vitality, when we can enjoy the food as close to its natural state and time of harvest.  So this living vitality, or etheric value, is enhanced when we prepare things either raw, or cook for the 'correct' amount so as to raise the food to its optimal degree of ripeness, or done-ness.  So potatoes or beets need some cooking to allow them to transform their inherent sugars to their best flavor and digestibility.  Sugar snap peas need less or no cooking, perhaps a slight stir-fry or steaming, because they are pretty close to ideal right off the vine.  Same with apples, tomatoes, and the like.

That said, the vitality of veggies or fruits, thought of as mentioned, is taken for quite a clobbering ride in a blender.  What occurs is that the vital, live, etheric forces within these foods, are wrenched apart and destroyed by the intensity of the mechanical handling.  The foods 'get the stuffing knocked out of them', as it were.  There remains some nutritional value, to be sure, but the vitality is no longer there.  The building blocks remain, but not the subtle and vibrant energies that grew those building blocks.  Thus, we would end up missing the benefit the soul gains as they would absorb these subtle life forces.  The soul derives its nourishment from these subtle life forces that created our foods, even as much as the body benefits from the physical materials comprising our foods.

These differences have been clinically and scientifically measured, chiefly in Europe over the last 50 years, and some in this country.  Long-standing pharmaceutical, cosmetics and therapeutic companies are built on these principles, and they definitely attest, in results-based studies, how important these forces are for the human being.

Again, I am wishing to offer these comments in a friendly manner, which may serve to open earnest conversation amongst others similarly concerned.

Allen

Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 5:00am; Reply: 24
thanks for sharing your valuable advice!
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 7:48am; Reply: 25
To get the Veggie Crisps crispy; After baking til soft (350F or so say 25 min.) then put them under the top element and Broil - turning frequently.

Also try 'Veggie Sushi rolls' - by Julienning different veggies. Carrot Beet strips with a good schmear of Umeboshi Paste. Excellent with Avocado if you feel {alas no more for me :'(}

Also Veggie Lasagna or Moussaka without the Noodle: Bake/steam large slices of veggies until soft. Then Alternately layer your ingredients in the Baking Dish. And instead of the Bechamel/Cheese Topping use a mixture of Yoghurt and Tofu...
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 2:04pm; Reply: 26
Think about using vegetables where we normally think of using grains.  For example, instead of pasta with pesto, broccoli florets with pesto are absolutely delicious, or spaghetti squash with pesto, ummmmmmmmmmm.

Wow...a short post!  Didn't know I had it in me.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 4:13pm; Reply: 27
You can make lasagna with thinly sliced zuchini ribbons like Schuggle said. Alot of people use shredded zuchini in baked goods.
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