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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Squash
Posted by: Lisalea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 7:35pm
It seems that B's can eat any type of squash ... however; I have NO idea what to buy or how to cook it besides the recipes that I've found here in the forum ... but they don't mention B's; ONLY  O's and A's
Any particular reason for this ?

Does Spaghetti squash really look like spaghetti ??

What about Acorn or Butternut or Winter squash  ??)

Oh and what about Pumpkin Squash ??
Pumpkin is an avoid for B's  :-/

Can somebody shed some light here  ;)

I'm anxious to try some type of squash or actually all of them eventually if I can   ;)
Thanks so very much beforehand ;D
Posted by: 972 (Guest), Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 7:45pm; Reply: 1
I'm not a B but can tell you YES spaghetti squash does look like spaghetti.  It's actually quite good.  I've had it a couple times last year.  Sorry I can't help on the other questions I'm still new to BTD myself as well as my 28 month old daughter.
Posted by: 972 (Guest), Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 7:47pm; Reply: 2
squash - - http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?399
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 7:57pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from LISALEA
What about Acorn or Butternut or Winter squash?


WF sometimes has a really good butternut squash with red swiss chard cold salad in their prepared foods section. The ingredients as far as I can remember are canola oil, lemon juice, parsley, salt, and maybe pepper. Basically, the squash is cooked at then cut into strips and tossed with sauteed red swiss chard and dressed. Someday I'm gonna make this at home.

The problem with butternut squash is it is very hard to cut before cooking, but when making a salad like this, you don't want to overcook it, or it will be hard to cut the flesh into strips. Lola has a good way to cook squashes without cutting them first. Perhaps she'll pop in here.

Whole Foods also has a really good recipe database CLICK. I've made many of these recipes.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 8:04pm; Reply: 4
right!
I just pop them in the oven, whole and let cool once they can be carved.

then cook the flesh however you want.....
freeze in separate bags, for other uses, once cooked.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 8:16pm; Reply: 5
I know a lot of recipes for winter squash especially the butternut variety. Side dish, dessert etc. I grow them in my garden every year. Let me know what you are interested in trying and I'll look up one. Off the top of my head:spicy roasted squash, two types of cheesecake, "pumpkin"pie made with butternut, glazed roasted butternut and apple slices in a orange and pineapple glaze etc. I am starting to get busy so it may take me a couple of days to get around to it. Offline this weekend also. BTW if you are a nonsecretor pumpkin is allowed.
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 8:18pm; Reply: 6
This recipe sounds good: Roasted Butternut Squash with Sage & Cranberries; just substitute out the things that aren't good for your blood type: CLICK.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 9:32pm; Reply: 7
Butternut squashes are generally sweet, Kaboucha squash is a great tasting, velvety, sweet squash; pie pumpkin squash is wonderful tasting and versatile in either savory or sweet dishes or meals.

I favor smaller squashes that can be easily cut up.  I have diced or choped up  squash into bite size pieces and sauted them or water steamed over the stovetop.  From my experience, baking various squashes produces a drier, sweeter squash.

Alia

Posted by: Lisalea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 10:42pm; Reply: 8
MommytoEliana, Drea, Lola, gulfcoastguy, Alia Vo ... Oh my,
I really appreciate all this amazing advice/ideas/recipes, I'm salivating !!!

gulfcoastguy: Please send me anything and everything that u can manage ;)
I absolutely love to cook and bake !!

Thank-u soooo much everybody, I appreciate it immensley :P ;) :) ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 11:10pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I know a lot of recipes for winter squash especially the butternut variety. Side dish, dessert etc. I grow them in my garden every year. Let me know what you are interested in trying and I'll look up one. Off the top of my head:spicy roasted squash, two types of cheesecake, "pumpkin"pie made with butternut, glazed roasted butternut and apple slices in a orange and pineapple glaze etc. I am starting to get busy so it may take me a couple of days to get around to it. Offline this weekend also. BTW if you are a nonsecretor pumpkin is allowed.


Hi again ... ok since u're quite busy, maybe I should be more specific ... I like spicy dishes ... hence the spicy roasted squash sounds delicious and/or any butternut variety that u mention sounds splendid ;) ;D
Thanks !!
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Thursday, March 15, 2007, 1:00am; Reply: 10
and don't forget soups! Squashes really shine in blended soups.
Posted by: Laura P, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 1:11am; Reply: 11
I love spagetti squash!!!

It is particularly good with eggs, there is a famous italian dish that left over spagetti cooked in a quiche with eggs, I do this with spagetti squash and cinnamon it is fabulous
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 1:46am; Reply: 12
Quoted from lkpetrolino
I love spagetti squash!!!

It is particularly good with eggs, there is a famous italian dish that left over spagetti cooked in a quiche with eggs, I do this with spagetti squash and cinnamon it is fabulous


ooooooh that sound so delicious !!!
Spagetti squash was my first choice, however; maybe I can replace it with nutmeg ... may u post ur recipe Laura ?? ;)
Thanks ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 1:47am; Reply: 13
Quoted from jayney-O
and don't forget soups! Squashes really shine in blended soups.


Absolutely ... I am a soup lover suddenly !!
;) :)
Especially when u add a little butter and cayenne to soups; so tasty !!
Thank-u jayney-O  ;D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 2:24am; Reply: 14
Okay Lisalea, "Spicy Roasted Squash" from Jamie Oliver's book "The Naked Chef"
1 butternut squash about 2 to 3 pounds in weight
2 tablespoons coriander seeds
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
2 small dried chile peppers
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1 clove garlic
1 tablespoon olive oil

mix all dry ingredients and grind in a mortar with a pestle(or sometimes I just use store ground)
add the chiles and garlic and mash into a paste, add olive oil(I usually use a lot more than a tablespoon)

wash the squash(don't peel it) and split it into 8 even lengthwise slices(split in half then split each half into half then split each quarter in half). Scoop out and discard the seeds and the stringy guts. Rub the paste all over the slices including the peel. Put them skin side down in a baking tray and roast uncovered for about 30 minutes at 400 F. It should caramelize the skin some. You can eat skin and all.

I'll try to post my Butternut squash pie next week though I might have posted it in the past.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 4:07am; Reply: 15
We grew acorn, buttercup and spaghetti squash.  Mom would cut the first two squash in half before baking.  

Sometimes she would bake them plain and then put butter and brown sugar in them for a side dish...  

Another way to eat them was to put a spicy meat mixture (think spicy meatloaf or sausage) in them and bake to have entrees...

Most of the time she cooks by taste, since she has been doing it for 55-60 years and has a Home Ec. degree.

The spaghetti got cooked (boiled), then used with our favorite sauces.  She would make a vegetable sauce with or without tomatoes by putting whatever vegetables she had too many of and start stewing them together until they were saucy and spice it appropriately before putting it over the spaghetti squash.

Oh, what memories!
Posted by: Schluggell, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 9:13am; Reply: 16
AHh for an excellent tasting Squash try the Delicata...
One variety you can slice and eat raw {easily} is the Patty Pan.

Also the Blossoms dipped in batter and fried - Even the leaves are edible on all squashes and very high in nutrition, the trick is to find a variety not so prickly/fuzzy.

Some old varieties are almost downright spiny - and were used to keep predators out of the garden by growing a squash fence/hedge.

Squashes are also used by the remaining farmers near  Chernobyl to help bioremediate the soil...
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 4:10pm; Reply: 17
Oh such great ideas, I'm off to buy some squash today !!!
I can't wait to make some and most of all "eat it"
LOL
I have a feeling that I will love it !!!
A great big thank-u to all  ;D ;) :)
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 4:51pm; Reply: 18
This is one of my favorite squash soup recipes, adapted from the cookbook "Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone" by Deborah Madison. Hubbard, butternut, buttercup, Kabocha--any dry-fleshed winter squash will work well here. You can add in things like cooked carrots, parsnips, turnips, broccoli or cooked chopped kale as well as ginger and cayenne--whatever you've got in your fridge that you think will taste good! This soup is even better the next day, when the flavors have had a chance to blend and mellow. This is excellent on cold blustery days in early spring, fall or winter, especially teamed up with grilled turkey sandwiches or beef/lamb/turkey burgers. Enjoy!

2 1/2--3 lbs/app 1--1 1/2kg winter squash
1/4 cup/60 ml olive oil, plus extra for the squash
6 garlic cloves, unpeeled
2 onions, finely chopped
chopped leaves from 4 thyme sprigs or 1/4 teaspoon/app 1.5g dried thyme
(you can substitute sage, oregano, marjoram or savory if you like, or make a blend with the thyme)
1/4 cup/50g chopped parsley
2 quarts/2 liters water or chicken/turkey stock
1/2 cup/100g pecorino, manchega, or other hard tangy cheese, diced into small cubes (optional)

Preheat the oven to moderately hot/375F/190C/Gas Mark 5. Halve the squash and scoop out the seeds. Brush the surfaces with oil, stuff the cavities with the garlic, and place them cut sides down on a baking sheet. Bake until tender when pressed with a finger, about 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a wide soup pot, heat the olive oil and add the onions, chopped thyme and parsley and saute over medium heat until the onions have begun to brown around the edges, 12-15 minutes. Scoop the squash flesh into the pot along with any juices that have accumulated in the baking pan. Peel the garlic and add it to the pot along with a pinch of sea salt (if desired) and the water/stock and bring it to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer, partially uncovered, for 25 minutes. If the soup becomes too thick, simply add more water to thin it out. When the soup is done, puree with a hand blender or in a food mill, season to taste (this is the time to add cayenne and/or ginger etc), then ladle into bowls and add the cheese if desired.

You can also make this in a slow cooker. Just saute the onions etc in a skillet, then put everything into the slow cooker and put it on the LOW setting. Prop the lid open just a bit with a piece of celery or carrot (if the prop falls into the soup it will just add to the flavor! :) ) so the steam can escape and the soup can thicken. When it's done, use a hand blender or potato masher to smooth out the texture if desired. It takes about 4-6 hours for the soup to cook in a slow cooker, but I've let it cook for 8-10 hours with no ill effects--which means you can start it in the morning before you head off to work or school, and come home to a delicious dinner!
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 5:00pm; Reply: 19
Another favorite recipe is to cut table (acorn) squash in half. Scoop out the seeds and brush the insides with plenty of olive oil and/or ghee. Put a ball or patty of uncooked sausage meat the size of a large egg in the hollow and bake on a foil covered baking sheet in a moderately hot/375F/190C/Gas Mark 5 oven for an hour. Serve with applesauce and a big green salad--yummy!

For the sausage meat you can season uncooked ground turkey, beef or lamb (or a blend of all three) with spices of your choosing as well as chopped sauteed onion, shallots and/or garlic, or use beef, turkey or lamb sausage links instead of the patties or ground meat. Hot spicy turkey or lamb sausage links are awesome served this way!
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 8:06pm; Reply: 20
great recipe!
thanks!
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, March 19, 2007, 2:16am; Reply: 21
Okay my quick and easy recipe for pumpkin pie. It was originally written for Cushaw squash But butternut is what I use. Last time I used a rice flour/butter crust but I think from no on I am going to make it crustless like a custard.

2 cups raw grated squash(just toss peeled hunks into a food processor)
3/4 cup brown sugar(substitute 1/2 cup vegetable glycerine)
dash salt
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon(B's could substitute mace or cloves or just not make it often)
2 eggs
1 cup half and half
1 teaspoon vanilla flavoring(real please)
1 pie shell 9 inch diameter

combine  squash, flour, sweetner, salt and spices togather
in seperate bowl mix eggs, half and half, and vanilla then add to first bowl

Bake at 400F for 10 minutes, then at 350F for about 40 more minutes
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 19, 2007, 2:27am; Reply: 22
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Okay my quick and easy recipe for pumpkin pie. It was originally written for Cushaw squash But butternut is what I use. Last time I used a rice flour/butter crust but I think from no on I am going to make it crustless like a custard.

2 cups raw grated squash(just toss peeled hunks into a food processor)
3/4 cup brown sugar(substitute 1/2 cup vegetable glycerine)
dash salt
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon(B's could substitute mace or cloves or just not make it often)
2 eggs
1 cup half and half
1 teaspoon vanilla flavoring(real please)
1 pie shell 9 inch diameter

combine  squash, flour, sweetner, salt and spices togather
in seperate bowl mix eggs, half and half, and vanilla then add to first bowl

Bake at 400F for 10 minutes, then at 350F for about 40 more minutes



I have two quick questions , if I may  ;)

Quoted from gulfcoastguy
3/4 cup brown sugar(substitute 1/2 cup vegetable glycerine)

Can I substitute fancy molasses, honey or agave nectar ??

Quoted from gulfcoastguy
1 pie shell 9 inch diameter

I imagine this is the original recipe and u're NOT using it right??

This pie sounds heavenly, it's gonna be VERY difficult not to have seconds ;)

I Thank-u  so much gulfcoastguy!!!  ;D ;) :)

P.S. I just went to check and allspice is an AVOID :(
Can I use both mace and cloves perhaps instead of cinnamon and allspice  ??)
Posted by: carmen, Monday, March 19, 2007, 2:48am; Reply: 23
Hi gulfcoastguy, in directions you mention flour but no quantity listed in ingredients. Is there any flour used, & how much please?
thanks
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, March 19, 2007, 3:28am; Reply: 24
Carmen, I didn't have the rice flour crust recipe handy, as I said I am not using it any more, trying to cut down on grains. I mentioned the pie crust from the original recipe so people could know what size pan to use. About the sweetner I use vegetable glycerine because I am a nonsecretor, by all means try agave nectar or molasses honey would taste a little off to me. About the allspice I usually make these for parties every couple of months or so at the most and only have 1 piece myself. If anybody can come up with a good substitute for allspice please post it. By all means try substituting spices, you can allways eat the evidence! Oh I'm not sure what half and half is in Oz speech..half heavy cream and half milk maybe?
Posted by: carmen, Monday, March 19, 2007, 4:50am; Reply: 25
Oh thanks, I read it as being an ingredient to thicken the filling....
half and half - I'd just use rice milk as dairy milk avoid for us.
weehee - just harvested 20+ pumpkins from our veg patch
cheers!
:8
Posted by: Lola, Monday, March 19, 2007, 5:22am; Reply: 26
mace or cloves
Posted by: 702 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 6:25am; Reply: 27
I just have to say that I absolutely adore Acorn squash.  It is so amazing.
Posted by: 255 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 3:15pm; Reply: 28
Spaghetti squash is pretty good- my husband & I even eat it with spaghetti sauce.
Definitely worth trying.
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 22, 2007, 1:40pm; Reply: 29
I have a Spaghetti squash sitting on my counter for a few days now and I have NO idea how to tell if it's ripe for cooking ... the clerk at the store where I purchased it was also clueless  :-/ ::) ??) :'(
Anybody know a trick ??  ;)
Thanks
;D
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, March 22, 2007, 7:36pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from LISALEA
I have a Spaghetti squash sitting on my counter for a few days now and I have NO idea how to tell if it's ripe for cooking ... Anybody know a trick ??  ;)
Thanks
;D

I think that if it was picked and in the store, it is probably ripe.  

It has been too long since growing our own for me to remember all of the details...  I know the skin gets tan, but can't remember any more. ??)

Here is a link to a seed house with more details...
http://gurneys.com/product.asp?pn=14982


Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 22, 2007, 10:21pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from ABJoe

I think that if it was picked and in the store, it is probably ripe.  

It has been too long since growing our own for me to remember all of the details...  I know the skin gets tan, but can't remember any more. ??)

Here is a link to a seed house with more details...
http://gurneys.com/product.asp?pn=14982




Thanks for the link, I guess I'll bake it and see what happens !!

;) :) ;D
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, March 23, 2007, 2:00am; Reply: 32
Thank you for sharing the website ABJoe.

Alia
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, March 23, 2007, 3:34am; Reply: 33
You are welcome for the link...  We've used Gurney's for seeds and plant for a long time.  

We always boiled the spaghetti squash and it was really moist.  Maybe by baking it, it would be a bit drier.  It isn't real flavorful, which makes it perfect for topping with a good sauce.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 3:19am; Reply: 34
Thank you for your spaghetti squash tips with us.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 1:27pm; Reply: 35
I 've come across a great site all about spaghetti squash !!;D

http://www.fabulousfoods.com/features/featuring/spagsquash.html

I finally baked it today and then added seasalt, cayenne pepper, parsley, butter and parmesan; all I could say is: :o
Yummiiiiii yum yum !! :P

Thanks to BTD that led me to discover this delicious dish  :K) ;)
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 9:18pm; Reply: 36
glad you enjoyed it!
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 9:53pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from lola
glad you enjoyed it!


I most certainly did, and I repeat:
I absolutely love BDT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;D :)
Grazie signorina Lola   ;)
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 10:54pm; Reply: 38
This site has alot of good recipes, thanks for posting
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 11:48pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from lkpetrolino
This site has alot of good recipes, thanks for posting


Im glad that u think so Laura, thank-u and u're welcome ;D ;) :)
Posted by: Alia Vo, Sunday, March 25, 2007, 2:58am; Reply: 40
Thank you for sharing the website with us.

You may want to add your dish in the Recipe Index for a spaghetti squash recipe entry.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 25, 2007, 3:23am; Reply: 41
U're very welcome and yes eventually I will sit down and add all my dishes in the Recipe Index hoping that others will enjoy them as much as I do  ;)
I'm just NOT sure how to do it yet; however, I will definately look into it in the near future ...
Thank-u  ;D :)
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Monday, March 26, 2007, 1:03am; Reply: 42
I like my squash cooked plain.  In the fall, I buy several Kombucha and Butternut squash at the Farmers Market  and store them in a dark closet.  That's what one lady at the Farmers Market told me I could do.  Then I can cook them when I want to.  I also like Acorn Squash and cooked Turban Squash last year.  

I found out last year though I have to watch them carefully as one of my Kombuchas started to mold about April or May.  This year, my Kombuchas started to mold in February, so I had to cook them quickly.

I use a vegetable peeler and a sharp knife to peel or cut the skin off.  Then I pull the seeds out.  I just add some water and start checking for tenderness about 20 minutes.  Sometimes I mash the cooking water into the squash.  Butter added before eating tastes yummy.

In the summer, all types of summer squash are at the market.  My favorite is yellow summer squash--again sliced plain and cooked quickly with a little water.  Sometimes I add sauteed onion.  Also some butter added before eating is good.  Scalloped squash and zucchini are also good cooked plain.  Sometimes I make a lasagna with rice and sauteed onion mixed in then layered with par cooked zucchini, layered with spaghetti sauce, then topped and possibly layered with mozzarella and sprinkled with feta bits and baked.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, March 26, 2007, 2:22am; Reply: 43
We've done the same things with squash, TypeO.  But in addition to all those, we enjoy summer squashes sliced thin and lightly coated with millet or rice flour then fried with onions in olive oil.

As far as how to tell if a squash is ready to eat.....you can eat summer squash when they're still babies--just a couple of inches long.  Great in stir-fry or just steamed.  With winter squash, they're ready when the bloom dries up and falls off, which, if you don't grow your own, you can't tell about.  But unlike fruit, because winter squashes can sit around for months, you can usually assume that if they're in the store, they're ready to eat.  They won't really ripen, per se, sitting on your counter, they'll just eventually mold or rot.

One thing we love to do with spaghetti squash:

Cut in half, gently scrape seeds out.  Place cut-side-down in baking dish and bake till a fork pierces it easily.  Remove from oven and cool till you can touch it.  With a fork, scrape strands out of skin.  Saute onions, garlic, whatever fresh garden herbs, and some sort of protein if desired, in lots of olive oil.  Stir into spaghetti squash.  Add sea salt and you've got yourself a delicious  meal.

Our favorite way to do butternut squash:

Peel with vegetable peeler.  Cut in half (with a big, heavy knife) and scrape out seeds.  Cut into 1-in. chunks.  Add same amount (or less) of same-size carrot chunks, one white onion cut into 8ths, toss in 1 Tbsp. olive oil and 1 tsp. dried rosemary.  Bake in oven in glass 9X13-in dish (or in two dishes if necessary) till fork-tender.  Salt lightly.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, March 26, 2007, 3:11am; Reply: 44
I just planted my Coban Pumpkins, a summer squash despite the name, today along with the tomatos and a blueberry bush. I'll probably plant the butternuts in about 2 weeks. I never was a fan of spaghetti squash but I found a very similar recipe in a cook book of mine. It had mushrooms, butter, garlic powder, salt, black pepper, and parmesan. It also has 25 more recipes for spaghetti squash. Of course alot of them would have to be "BTD adjusted" as usual.
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 26, 2007, 3:47am; Reply: 45
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
My favorite is yellow summer squash--again sliced plain and cooked quickly with a little water.  Sometimes I add sauteed onion.  Also some butter added before eating is good. Scalloped squash and zucchini are also good cooked plain.  Sometimes I make a lasagna with rice and sauteed onion mixed in then layered with par cooked zucchini, layered with spaghetti sauce, then topped and possibly layered with mozzarella and sprinkled with feta bits and baked.


Anything with feta is music to my ears !!;)
TY  ;D :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 26, 2007, 3:53am; Reply: 46
Quoted from Ribbit
We've done the same things with squash, TypeO.  But in addition to all those, we enjoy summer squashes sliced thin and lightly coated with millet or rice flour then fried with onions in olive oil.


Thats really sounds wonderful ...

Quoted from Ribbit
As far as how to tell if a squash is ready to eat.....you can eat summer squash when they're still babies--just a couple of inches long.  Great in stir-fry or just steamed.  With winter squash, they're ready when the bloom dries up and falls off, which, if you don't grow your own, you can't tell about.  But unlike fruit, because winter squashes can sit around for months, you can usually assume that if they're in the store, they're ready to eat.  They won't really ripen, per se, sitting on your counter, they'll just eventually mold or rot.

Thanks for the info !!

Quoted from Ribbit
One thing we love to do with spaghetti squash:

Cut in half, gently scrape seeds out.  Place cut-side-down in baking dish and bake till a fork pierces it easily.  Remove from oven and cool till you can touch it.  With a fork, scrape strands out of skin.  Saute onions, garlic, whatever fresh garden herbs, and some sort of protein if desired, in lots of olive oil.  Stir into spaghetti squash.  Add sea salt and you've got yourself a delicious  meal.

I will have to eat my spaghetti squash with different vegetables next time and lots of onions; I absolutely have to have onions in at least one meal per day  ;)


Quoted from Ribbit
Our favorite way to do butternut squash:

Peel with vegetable peeler.  Cut in half (with a big, heavy knife) and scrape out seeds.  Cut into 1-in. chunks.  Add same amount (or less) of same-size carrot chunks, one white onion cut into 8ths, toss in 1 Tbsp. olive oil and 1 tsp. dried rosemary.  Bake in oven in glass 9X13-in dish (or in two dishes if necessary) till fork-tender.  Salt lightly.

Mmmm fiberfull dish, I will have to try it ...ROSEMARY is another spice that I really enjoy in dishes

;)
Thanks very much for the great tips  ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 26, 2007, 3:56am; Reply: 47
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I just planted my Coban Pumpkins, a summer squash despite the name, today along with the tomatos and a blueberry bush. I'll probably plant the butternuts in about 2 weeks. I never was a fan of spaghetti squash but I found a very similar recipe in a cook book of mine. It had mushrooms, butter, garlic powder, salt, black pepper, and parmesan. It also has 25 more recipes for spaghetti squash. Of course alot of them would have to be "BTD adjusted" as usual.


Oh yes, of course mushrooms is a grand idea for the next time  and course there's gonna be butter and parmesan as well; THAT makes the dish !! ;) :)
Thank-u  ;D
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Monday, March 26, 2007, 6:38pm; Reply: 48
Last year was the first year I tried to plant winter squash.  I waited til April when the frost had passed.  I don't have that much room to plant smaller things, and people walk their pets around the neighborhood...  I had dried my seeds from the year before.  One Butternut vine grew two squashes.  It was quite a thrill.

Later I kept seeing the vine growing with little flowers, so I thought I'd get more squashes.  I asked a man at the Farmer's Market how to tell when they were ripe.  In the process of talking he found out I was still watering the vine.  Since the squash was planted in with the rest of my yard where I did drip irrigation, he said I needed to stop watering the squash once it was developed.   He said it was too late in the year (by then maybe July).  I needed to pull the vine roots out of the ground.  He said when the vine died, the squash was ready to pick and eat.  That was my lesson in growing squash.  

Thanks everyone for the recipes; I may try a few.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, March 26, 2007, 7:41pm; Reply: 49
thanks for the info!
Posted by: Alia Vo, Monday, March 26, 2007, 9:33pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
I like my squash cooked plain.  In the fall, I buy several Kombucha and Butternut squash at the Farmers Market  and store them in a dark closet.  That's what one lady at the Farmers Market told me I could do.  Then I can cook them when I want to.


I believe I have read a similar account for storing kombucha squash, or perhaps more generally, winter squashes; since they seem to have a long storage life if maintained in a temperate climate.

Alia

Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 1:56am; Reply: 51
TypeOSecreter, thanks for the info on the winter squash and discontinuing the water.  I just planted mine along with summer squash and cucumbers (compact plants to fit in my square foot gardens), but maybe that wasn't such a good idea 'cause they'll all get the same amount of water being right next to each other.  We should start a gardening tips thread.  :)
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 3:18am; Reply: 52
I wouldn't worry.  Just give it a try.  Mine had 2 full-grown winter squashes  and had been on the vine quite a long time (maybe months) before the man at the Farmer's Market told me to pull the roots out.  They were full grown.

Another thing I forgot to mention was that squashes need bees to cross pollinate the flowers before they will grow.  I don't really understand the whole process, but just hoped they'd be around when I planted.  I tried planting watermelon seeds and crenshaw melon seeds, but only my two butternuts grew.  I think the others may not have had enough sun because all I got were little green sprouts that stayed that way for about 4 months until it was too late for them to grow.
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 3:34am; Reply: 53
If I make squash my main meal; I'm wondering if I can eat half of it in one sitting ??)
(approx. 2 cups) since that's how much vegetables I usually eat in a meal !!
Just don't want to overdo it  ;)
Thank-u  ;D
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 3:47am; Reply: 54
Quoted from LISALEA
If I make squash my main meal; I'm wondering if I can eat half of it in one sitting ??)
(approx. 2 cups) since that's how much vegetables I usually eat in a meal !!
Just don't want to overdo it  ;)
Thank-u  ;D

My body usually tells me when I've had enough.  I jsut need to be wise enough to listen! ;D ;)
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 12:07pm; Reply: 55
Quoted from ABJoe

My body usually tells me when I've had enough.  I jsut need to be wise enough to listen! ;D ;)



;)

I have  a hard time listening to my body 'cause I love to eat !! :P

Thanks ABJoe  ;D
Posted by: 739 (Guest), Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 1:04pm; Reply: 56
Can anyone tell me what a good herbal tea would be for a O+ blood type.  I've been using green tea, but the diet recommends no caffeine even though green tea is neutral.  I'd like a beneficial tea for an O+ person.  

tnx.
for any input in advance.

luluboy
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 10:15pm; Reply: 57
rooibos perhaps.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 10:24pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from LISALEA
If I make squash my main meal; I'm wondering if I can eat half of it in one sitting ??)
(approx. 2 cups) since that's how much vegetables I usually eat in a meal !!
Just don't want to overdo it  ;)
Thank-u  ;D


As long as you feel comfortable, energized, and not 'stuffed'.  

I believe for most blood groups, beneficial vegetables are listed as unlimited in portion/frequency guideline recommendations.  Perhaps you may want to watch the portions if they are neutral for you.

Alia


Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 10:54pm; Reply: 59
Quoted from Alia_Vo


As long as you feel comfortable, energized, and not 'stuffed'.  

I believe for most blood groups, beneficial vegetables are listed as unlimited in portion/frequency guideline recommendations.  Perhaps you may want to watch the portions if they are neutral for you.

Alia




Oh I see ... ok,  then unlimited ONLY when it comes to
beneficial vegetables otherwise smaller portions r recommended  ? ;)

Thank-u Alia, I appreciate it  ;D  :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 10:58pm; Reply: 60
Quoted from lola
rooibos perhaps.


I second that Lola  ;) and the benfits of rooibos r wonderful ... helpful/relief of stomach and 'digestive" problems such as nausea, heart burn, stomach ulcers and  "constipation" ... I also like the smell and such a lovely color !!  ;D
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 11:06pm; Reply: 61
Quoted from LISALEA


Oh I see ... ok,  then unlimited ONLY when it comes to
beneficial vegetables otherwise smaller portions r recommended  ? ;)

Thank-u Alia, I appreciate it  ;D  :)


If you do well with unlimited neutrals, then that is fine.  

I was referring to what was suggested in LR for blood type A's, which is unlimited vegetables (both neutral and beneficial, raw and cooked).  If I remember correctly, the recommendations for each blood type may vary.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 11:57pm; Reply: 62
Quoted from Alia_Vo


If you do well with unlimited neutrals, then that is fine.  

I was referring to what was suggested in LR for blood type A's, which is unlimited vegetables (both neutral and beneficial, raw and cooked).  If I remember correctly, the recommendations for each blood type may vary.

Alia


For B's =  3-5 cups per day  ;D ;) Thanks
Posted by: Ribbit, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 8:16pm; Reply: 63
Argh!  Atlanta experienced a late frost and all my squash plants died!  [Okay, breathe deeply, relax, imagine summer time.]  ....  and replant.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 8:30pm; Reply: 64
where has spring gone??
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, April 11, 2007, 10:24pm; Reply: 65
Ribbit seed is cheap, just replant. It happened to a lot of people. Sometimes Mother Nature just has PMS.
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, April 13, 2007, 12:33am; Reply: 66
Plant Muerte Syndrome? :D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, April 13, 2007, 2:00am; Reply: 67
Si es muy loca in la cabaza!
Posted by: ion, Saturday, April 14, 2007, 9:50pm; Reply: 68
Quoted from lola
where has spring gone??


Definately HERE!!
If i only knew how to put a picture in my post...
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, April 16, 2007, 1:40am; Reply: 69
Es muy loca in la calabaza.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 4:45am; Reply: 70
great spanish Ribbit!!
me likes!! lol
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 4:52am; Reply: 71
Es muy loca in la calabaza.

Si es muy loca in la cabaza!

Quoted Text
Es muy loca in la calabaza


Quoted Text
Si es muy loca in la cabaza


what s it going to be, calabaza or cabaza?

did you mean to say cabeza, GCG?
or calabaza, meaning squash? ;)

got two options>
loca de la cabeza /head/
or
loca la calabaza /squash/
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 12:09pm; Reply: 72
Cabeza of course querida.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 2:29pm; Reply: 73
;)

cabeza llena de calabaza!!
Posted by: colojd, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 7:14pm; Reply: 74
We are a family of two type B's and one O (do not know our secretor status). We eat all types of squash year round and grow several varities in our backyard garden. I think most are neutrals for us. We grow organically and all of what we eat from our garden is vine ripened, so I am sure that what we eat from the garden during the summer has more nutrients than the average grocery store type that might have been picked underripe.

We grew a winter squash called Buttercup last year and it was wonderful. We also have zuchinni and yellow squash each year as well. We try to add one or two new types of whatever we are growing and have started also growing more heirloom varities.

Regarding the rice flour crust - not sure if you have tried it, but there is brown rice flour if you are trying to avoid the refined rice. I also found that for best results, you have to pre-bake it for about 10 minutes. This sets the crust and it won't get soggy then. We did an almond flour crust for a cheesecake we made at Christmas. It was great but I did forget to do the pre-baking step so it was a little soft. May want to try your recipe again with the prebaked crust.

We also are trying to cut down on grains and when we do eat them, try for the most unrefined of what is out there, like whole brown rice.
Joyce
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 8:05pm; Reply: 75
would you share the almond crust recipe?
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, April 19, 2007, 11:32pm; Reply: 76
Quoted from colojd
We are a family of two type B's and one O (do not know our secretor status). We eat all types of squash year round and grow several varities in our backyard garden.


Joyce,

I favor the taste and texture of fresh organic pie pumpkin and kobacha squash.  

Since you grow a variey of squashes year round, in your opinion, what are your recommended squash varieties in terms of taste and texture akin to the aforementioned winter squashes?

Alia
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