Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Amaranth Grain
Posted by: 1521 (Guest), Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 3:35pm
I tried cooking this according to package directions and it was very musty smelling and not very good at all.  It is a very healthy grain but does anyone have a recipe for it?   ??)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 8:11pm; Reply: 1
If you click on the link for Amaranth HERE in the Typebase, and scroll down, you will see four recipies that include amaranth.

The recipies are titled:

   * Amaranth Flatbreads/Crackers
   * Amaranth flatbread
   * Amaranth 'tortilla chips" or crackers
   * Kate's Amaranth Waffles

And, there are three recent recipies added to the typebase, just below those entries that include amaranth:


   * Roasted onion and fig jam appetizer
   * Turkey w/ Millet - Stovetop Casserole
   * Wild Blueberry Soup
Posted by: 1521 (Guest), Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 9:31pm; Reply: 2
I did see those recipes but they are for Amaranth flour.  I was hoping to find a way to make the grain.  I liked the texture just could not get past the musty smell or taste of it.   :-/  Thank you though!
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, March 8, 2007, 12:51am; Reply: 3
Make sure you soak it thoroughly before using it.  

I believe I have cooked the grain on the stovetop probably less than five times; I try to eat amaranth sprouted raw for breakfast once a week.

Alia
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, March 8, 2007, 12:53am; Reply: 4
Cocky gave me a recipe that uses amaranth:

A Híghly Beneficial breakfast for type A

Breakfast Amaranth/Buckwheat porridge by Cocky

4 or 5 tablespoons of amaranth grain
4 or 5 tablespoons of broken buckwheat
4 or 5 tablespoons of Kasha (roasted whole buckwheat)

Put in a pot with plenty of water (2 liters) and stir regularly.

When boiling put off the heat and stir again. Put a lid on the pot and let it stay overnight and do add some Miso (teaspoon!). And stir again so that the porridge becomes a bit brownish.. You will notice that the miso has a fermenting capacity that makes the grains better digestible. Miso is sooo healthy for A..

Next morning: take the quantity you need for your breakfast (soupbowl) and heat it a little.
When heating, add 3 dried apricots (cut into pieces!) to your porridge.
When on temperature, fill your bowl with the porridge and add 1 tblspoon wheatfree muesli and 1 tbspoon whole or grounded flaxseeds, and 1 tbspoon Vegetable glycerine, or maplesyrup or honey.

Instead of dried fruits, you can also add dried or fresh blueberries, or other beneficial fruits, chopped walnuts, dried cranberries, whatever you like!

For non-secretors and/or people with Candida-infection Vegetable glycerine is a great sugarsubsitute.

This quantity of porridge is good for 4 breakfasts. Keep the porridge in the fridge.

Amaranth is so good for intestinal health, prevents coloncancer
Buckwheat is good for balancing sugarmetabolism.

Enjoy this easy, quick-to prepare-breakfast!!
I always have this porridge for my breakfast and it nevers get boring!
It is quick, beneficial and keeps my stomach happy till after noontime!!

Cocky
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, March 8, 2007, 12:55am; Reply: 5
I have cooked it (whole grain) as a gruel or mush. My experience is that it takes a lot more water and cooking time than recipies suggest. Also, it seems to require frequent stirring to keep it from sticking.

From my experience use up to 4:1 water (rater than 2:1) and cook till desired tenderness/mushiness is acheived. For me, that's more than an hour. Some of that time can be sitting in a covered pot off the burner. For a thinner gruel even 5:1 or 6:1 would work.

I like it best when thoroughly cooked, if you can take it 'al dente' then the cook time is significantly reduced. Liberal use of ghee makes a pleasant side dish. I have also experiment with adding veggies, the best results have come with turnip root. Sweet potato should be nice as well (diced small to medium).
Posted by: 1521 (Guest), Thursday, March 8, 2007, 7:16pm; Reply: 6
Thank you Drea!  I'm going to try that recipe!  Enjoy!
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, March 8, 2007, 7:23pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg
I have cooked it (whole grain) as a gruel or mush. My experience is that it takes a lot more water and cooking time than recipies suggest. Also, it seems to require frequent stirring to keep it from sticking.

From my experience use up to 4:1 water (rater than 2:1) and cook till desired tenderness/mushiness is acheived. For me, that's more than an hour. Some of that time can be sitting in a covered pot off the burner. For a thinner gruel even 5:1 or 6:1 would work.

I like it best when thoroughly cooked, if you can take it 'al dente' then the cook time is significantly reduced. Liberal use of ghee makes a pleasant side dish. I have also experiment with adding veggies, the best results have come with turnip root. Sweet potato should be nice as well (diced small to medium).


Thank you for your cooking/prep tips.

Alia
Posted by: colorfulveggies, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 3:13am; Reply: 8
Quoted from 1poplargirl
I did see those recipes but they are for Amaranth flour.  I was hoping to find a way to make the grain.  I liked the texture just could not get past the musty smell or taste of it...


I used to love those 7-grain cereals (before BTD), so I blended my own:

1/3-c amaranth
1/3-c millet (or quinoa)
2/3-c brown rice grits
1/4-tsp salt
6 cups boiling water

Add grain to water and stir until the rice thickens (that helps keep it from sticking).  Then it needs to simmer for a long time...  I ate some after about 30 minutes, before the millet was done.  I think you'll know it's done when you can't see it anymore.  When I used the quinoa, it cooked faster.

To my serving, I added my flaxseed "gel" that I had soaked overnight, some rice bran, and some raisins.  I liked it!  Good thing too, because I made enough to eat all week!


Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 9:42am; Reply: 9
::) I prefere all grains by emselves, no mixups ::) millet....very :P .....;) tooo starchy for my opinion
and I get very tired after eating that cellarsniffeling product .....cough...cough.... :-/ :X
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 12:25pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from 1poplargirl
I tried cooking this according to package directions and it was very musty smelling and not very good at all...


As above thoroughly soak and rinse first...However a "musty smell" probably means they weren't very fresh or not stored very well.
Posted by: Vicki, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 2:41pm; Reply: 11
I cook amaranth in water and then serve with molasses or vegetable glycerine....you could also put a little xylitol in the water.   It is good with blueberries!
Posted by: Laura P, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 4:02pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Schluggell


As above thoroughly soak and rinse first...However a "musty smell" probably means they weren't very fresh or not stored very well.


agreed, amaranth goes rancid very easily
Print page generated: Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 12:58pm