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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Umeboshi; Pickled plums
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 8:50pm
http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/cooking/preserving/plum-japan.htm
Has anybody tried these ?

I became curious after reading about the benefits ...

I imagine that they're ok for  B's ...
but then again, I would have to take a look at the ingredients ...  ??)
Hmm not sure about the sake and especially the drops of red food colouring :-/ :X

I'll have to check out the ones at the Natural store that I went to today.

Thank-u ;D
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 9:03pm; Reply: 1
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/otd/archives/00000380.htm
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:16pm; Reply: 2
I use umeboshi paste when making sushi. But use it sparingly because it is very salty.
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:29pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from lola


Thanks so much Lola; now I know what ingredients to look for  ;D :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:30pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from outdoordrea
I use umeboshi paste when making sushi. But use it sparingly because it is very salty.



Really ?? :o
I guess I will have to try it , Thanks so much  ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 11:34pm; Reply: 5
Plums are beneficial for B's.

Umeboshi plums are actually a cultured food, so they are very rich in enzymes, and have an alkaline effect inside the body.  They are considered a very balancing and healthy food.  The whole plums, plum paste and brine are used.  Eden is a brand that has no avoids.  Dye is not used in their umeboshi.

Since they are salty, no additional salt is needed in most foods when they are used.  As Drea said, use sparingly.
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 2:55am; Reply: 6
Quoted from Victoria
Plums are beneficial for B's.

Umeboshi plums are actually a cultured food, so they are very rich in enzymes, and have an alkaline effect inside the body.  They are considered a very balancing and healthy food.  The whole plums, plum paste and brine are used.  Eden is a brand that has no avoids.  Dye is not used in their umeboshi.

Since they are salty, no additional salt is needed in most foods when they are used.  As Drea said, use sparingly.


Thanks so much Victoria that is indeed music to my ears ...  ;)
something NEW to try and it's beneficial .. Yuppii !!

Now I just have to find a store that sells in my city hopefully and I'm set !!
;D  :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 2:56am; Reply: 7
I wonder if anybody's made them from scratch in their own kitchen and if so how did they turn out ??
and
Can I have the recipe please !?   ;D ;)
Thanks
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, March 5, 2007, 7:13am; Reply: 8
I like umeboshi a lot- but then again Iīm a "chutney girl " ;-)
wonder if they are beneficials ??) or just neutral
since ume is another kind of plum than the regular tested one- far more closer to apricot
read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ume
I donīt know about making it yourself ....
Posted by: Schluggell, Monday, March 5, 2007, 11:48am; Reply: 9
Ume {Prunus mume - Rosaceae}
The true "Japanese plum" {Sumomo, 'Momo' is Peach inJap.} is another fruit altogether {P. salicina - Rosaceae}

It is actually more like a small round Apricot/Peach, rather than a plum.
The flavour is very similar to the unrelated Amla of India.
The pit {Tenjin-sama} can be eaten much like an Almond or Apricot Kernel.
There are 'Bungo's which are actually hybrids of Ume & Apricots.

It never really ripens - so that is why it is pickled or preserved in Shochu {similar to Vodka} to soften the fruit.

Additionally the red colouring from homemade Umeboshi comes from the addition of Aka-Shiso leaves {Perilla frutescens var. crispus, also known as Beefsteak Plant - but its the Red type not the Green} to the pickling brine.
However, much of the store-bought Umeboshi would not be coloured this way.

You will find the Ume Plum Trees as specimens in Arboretums and University campuses, even along old Estate Lanes - Typically the birds don't even take the fruit. I have surprised many a Japanese guest with my own Homemade Umes {even Japanese whom have lived many years in US}.


As to BTD: Compare the TYPEBase for Apricot, Peach, Almond, etc. for your type. As these are all Prunus sp. that are very similar.
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 1:11pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Schluggell
Ume {Prunus mume - Rosaceae}
The true "Japanese plum" {Sumomo, 'Momo' is Peach inJap.} is another fruit altogether {P. salicina - Rosaceae}

It is actually more like a small round Apricot/Peach, rather than a plum.
The flavour is very similar to the unrelated Amla of India.
The pit {Tenjin-sama} can be eaten much like an Almond or Apricot Kernel.
There are 'Bungo's which are actually hybrids of Ume & Apricots.

It never really ripens - so that is why it is pickled or preserved in Shochu {similar to Vodka} to soften the fruit.

Additionally the red colouring from homemade Umeboshi comes from the addition of Aka-Shiso leaves {Perilla frutescens var. crispus, also known as Beefsteak Plant - but its the Red type not the Green} to the pickling brine.
However, much of the store-bought Umeboshi would not be coloured this way.

You will find the Ume Plum Trees as specimens in Arboretums and University campuses, even along old Estate Lanes - Typically the birds don't even take the fruit. I have surprised many a Japanese guest with my own Homemade Umes {even Japanese whom have lived many years in US}.


As to BTD: Compare the TYPEBase for Apricot, Peach, Almond, etc. for your type. As these are all Prunus sp. that are very similar.




Thank-u !!  ;D :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 1:13pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
I like umeboshi a lot- but then again Iīm a "chutney girl " ;-)
wonder if they are beneficials ??) or just neutral
since ume is another kind of plum than the regular tested one- far more closer to apricot
read more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ume
I donīt know about making it yourself ....


Hi "chutney girl " and TY ;D

For ur info ...
Quoted from Victoria
Plums are beneficial for B's.

Umeboshi plums are actually a cultured food, so they are very rich in enzymes, and have an alkaline effect inside the body.  They are considered a very balancing and healthy food.  The whole plums, plum paste and brine are used.  Eden is a brand that has no avoids.  Dye is not used in their umeboshi.

Since they are salty, no additional salt is needed in most foods when they are used.  As Drea said, use sparingly.
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Monday, March 5, 2007, 6:44pm; Reply: 12
In the recipe listed in the website shown above could I substitute lemon juice or just plain water to get the same affect of pickling?
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, March 5, 2007, 7:27pm; Reply: 13
Umeboshi are excellent for upset stomachs. A very small piece chewed well will calm nausea and indigestion for most people. Also, if you like rice balls, a small piece of umeboshi placed in the center of the rice ball will help preserve and flavor it. Great snack for those who can have grains :)

I get my umeboshi from Eden, their whole plums and paste are very high quality.
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 8:25pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Brighid45
I get my umeboshi from Eden, their whole plums and paste are very high quality.


Me, too.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, March 5, 2007, 8:48pm; Reply: 15
All I know is, I almost bought some umeboshi plums yesterday to try for the first time.  But the price was something out of this world.  I don't remember exactly but it was something like $29.00 or something utterly out in the ozone layer.  And this for a small package.  I exclaimed aloud to the tune of "(insert whatever the price was here) dollars, are you KIDDING ME?  Won't be buying THIS! *indignant sigh*"

...gotta go, cannot hear myself think today with Temptation Island in beyond full swing and people constantly asking me questions regarding same...*indignant sigh:  the sequel!*
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 10:51pm; Reply: 16
I buy the paste; and while it is $7+ for a small tub, a little goes a long way, so it lasts a long time.
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, March 5, 2007, 11:15pm; Reply: 17
Yes, umeboshi are expensive--but as several people here have said, a little goes a long way, and they do keep just about forever. I've used both the paste and the whole plums and prefer the plums, but the paste is nice for sushi :)

To make the rice balls, just cook up a batch of sticky rice and form into balls the size of a walnut, then push a pea-sized piece of umeboshi into the center. I used to make rice balls to take with me when travelling or for a light lunch.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 1:07am; Reply: 18
I have used umeboshi paste in the past.  It is a very concentrated food item which flavors foods intensely, a little amount goes a long way.

It mixed nicely with filtered water for a light salad dressing.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 3:20am; Reply: 19
Thank-u for the great ideas, I will definately buy myself a jar next time I go shopping; if I find a compliant one  ;) :)
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 8:56am; Reply: 20
Quoted from Cathy
In the recipe listed in the website shown above could I substitute lemon juice or just plain water to get the same affect of pickling?


You could substitute the other liquids - as its more the salt that gives the pickling.
More commonly the brine is really Salt and Neutral Spirits {Shouchu}

If you were not to use salt, use real Lemon Juice and the Red Shiso leaves - but realize this will probably have a shelf-life...
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 12:46pm; Reply: 21
Since these little gems are so expensive, I wanted to try this recipe, so I will use the salt.  I will probably substitute the Spirits.

Thanks for your input, Schluggell.     :)
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 4:02pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Cathy
Since these little gems are so expensive...


They do come in different grades with varying costs involved.

You may also just pack them in salt {like making Sauerkraut} to pickle them.
But then these will turn out the old-fashioned way, not as what you see in the stores.

Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 5:07pm; Reply: 23
I used to buy the plum paste and the whole plums.  That was when I used to eat a lot of rice.  Now, I don't buy them anymore, but I keep a bottle of Eden Umeboshi Plum Vinegar (not a vinegar), which I add to extra virgin olive oil and crushed garlic and some herbs.  

approx measures:

2 Cups olive oil
2 tsp ume brine
6 cloves of crushed garlic
a generous amount of herbs, either fresh or dry.  My current favorites are parsley, basil and/or holy basil.

Shake well and use as salad dressing or a drizzle over vegetables, etc.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 5:40pm; Reply: 24

Oooooooh, now I see why it is so expensive.  It is very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very concentrated, intense and salty.  Thanks for the 411.  I assumed it was concentrated but just not that concentrated.  Apparently it is that concentrated.  Thus possibly justifying shelling out a plethora-o-dollars for it.

Again, thanks for the 411.  I shall check it out anew next time I'm at the HFS.
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 7:29pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Victoria
I used to buy the plum paste and the whole plums.  That was when I used to eat a lot of rice.  Now, I don't buy them anymore, but I keep a bottle of Eden Umeboshi Plum Vinegar (not a vinegar), which I add to extra virgin olive oil and crushed garlic and some herbs.  

approx measures:

2 Cups olive oil
2 tsp ume brine
6 cloves of crushed garlic
a generous amount of herbs, either fresh or dry.  My current favorites are parsley, basil and/or holy basil.

Shake well and use as salad dressing or a drizzle over vegetables, etc.


Oooh!  THAT sounds good!!!
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 8:00pm; Reply: 26
It IS good, Cathy.  I don't cook with olive oil because of the low smoking point of olive oil, so this is a good way for me to consume some extra virgin olive oil everyday, add flavor to food and get the enzymes from the ume "vinegar" also.

I haven't seen the expensive prices that others are talking about.  I pay less than $4 for a bottle of the Eden brand Ume Plum "Vinegar".
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 8:25pm; Reply: 27
The vinegar is cheaper than the paste, it's true. The whole plums are the most pricey. I have a small bottle of ume vinegar in my fridge as well.
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 2:24am; Reply: 28
I am getting anxious to try this recipe and make the ume vinegar...Always up to doing something new and good.   ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 5:47pm; Reply: 29
Did someone post a link to making pickled ume plums?  I couldn't see it.

Since the  process appears to resemble the way cultured foods are made, such as Kim Chee, I wonder if those recipes could be used to cure the ume plums.

Schluggell knows a lot about cultured vegetables, and the process used to get them to that point.
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Wednesday, March 7, 2007, 7:44pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from LISALEA


Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 22, 2007, 10:06pm; Reply: 31
I added Umeboshi Paste to my beans/rice/brussels sprouts/carrot dish tonight and to be honest I didn't taste it that much  :-/
perhaps it was 'cause I just used half a teaspoon in a very big dish maybe I'll add more next time ... at least I know that it's beneficial for me hence that's great !!   ;D ;) :)
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 12:52am; Reply: 32
Lisalea, try tasting a bit by itself...you'll notice it then! LOL!
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 12:59am; Reply: 33
Quoted from outdoordrea
Lisalea, try tasting a bit by itself...you'll notice it then! LOL!


;) :) :P ;D
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, March 23, 2007, 1:44am; Reply: 34
Quoted from LISALEA
I added Umeboshi Paste to my beans/rice/brussels sprouts/carrot dish tonight and to be honest I didn't taste it that much  :-/
perhaps it was 'cause I just used half a teaspoon in a very big dish maybe I'll add more next time ... at least I know that it's beneficial for me hence that's great !!   ;D ;) :)


One teaspoon or a half teaspoon sound be fine.  Try adding some type of liquid to emulsify the paste to distribute the ume plum flavor evenly with the contents of your food.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 1:50am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Alia_Vo


One teaspoon or a half teaspoon sound be fine.  Try adding some type of liquid to emulsify the paste to distribute the ume plum flavor evenly with the contents of your food.

Alia


Thanks Alia, that's indeed a grand idea !!  ;D :)
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 23, 2007, 4:43am; Reply: 36
I think of Ume plum paste as the type B's miso.  It is rich in enzymes and should not be cooked, in my opinion, but added at the end of cooking.  It is more concentrated than miso, though, and can't be used in such quantity, or it will be too salty.

I use Alia's technique of mixing in a bit of water to thin out the paste so that it can mix into whatever you want to add it to.
Posted by: 353 (Guest), Friday, March 23, 2007, 8:50am; Reply: 37

For purify my liver iI used to put a umaboshi in a cup, cover with boiled water,  let stay for 2/3 hous and then drink this "tea"

You can use the same plum several times.
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, March 23, 2007, 9:02am; Reply: 38
Quoted from daniela
..used to put a umaboshi in a cup, cover with boiled water,  let stay for 2/3 hous and then drink this "tea"...


You sound Japanese...this is indeed one of thei "Folke Remedies".

There are several methodes to "pickling" the Umeboshi - It is my understanding {thus far} that for the Red-Type pickles that its pickled with Sake lees and Rice Bran. The nat some point it will be stored in a crock with Red Shiso {Perilla} leaves for the added colour/flavour.

As to the vinegar; All you would really need to do is place several plums in Sake and referment...

Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 12:21pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Victoria
I think of Ume plum paste as the type B's miso.  It is rich in enzymes and should not be cooked, in my opinion, but added at the end of cooking.  It is more concentrated than miso, though, and can't be used in such quantity, or it will be too salty.

I use Alia's technique of mixing in a bit of water to thin out the paste so that it can mix into whatever you want to add it to.


Thank-u Victoria ... I did add it only at the end when my dish was ready to be served ...
it's ok to add it to a pipping hot meal though right ?
or is it best with room temperature or cold foods ?
Thanks again  :) ;)
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, March 23, 2007, 2:47pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from LISALEA
...it's ok to add it to a pipping hot meal though right ?
or is it best with room temperature or cold foods...


Traditionally its used at the table like a relish or condiment and/or eaten at the end of the meal to settle the stomach.
The paste is also schmeared onto the rice when making Sushi Rolls.
Or placed inside of Onigiri {Rice Balls wrapped in Nori - their version of a Lunch Sandwich}.

Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 23, 2007, 4:35pm; Reply: 41
Ume is great for settling heartburn since it is alkaline.  If I ever have this problem, I put just a tiny bit on my tongue and hold it in my mouth for as long as possible.  It makes abundant saliva!  :-)

I sometimes put it on hot food, but only after it has been taken off the stove.  I prefer it as a condiment as Schluggell said.
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 5:21pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from Schluggell


Traditionally its used at the table like a relish or condiment and/or eaten at the end of the meal to settle the stomach.
The paste is also schmeared onto the rice when making Sushi Rolls.
Or placed inside of Onigiri {Rice Balls wrapped in Nori - their version of a Lunch Sandwich}.



Oh ok I see, thanks Schluggell ;D :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 23, 2007, 5:23pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from Victoria
Ume is great for settling heartburn since it is alkaline.  If I ever have this problem, I put just a tiny bit on my tongue and hold it in my mouth for as long as possible.  It makes abundant saliva!  :-)

I sometimes put it on hot food, but only after it has been taken off the stove.  I prefer it as a condiment as Schluggell said.


I will definately take that advice ;) :)
Thank-u  ;D
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 3:44am; Reply: 44
I believe ume plum paste is used as a condiment in a similar manner in which miso is used.  It is advised that one should add miso to the end of cooking or once they have taken their cooking apparatus off of the stove burner.  It is commonly recommended that miso is added to warm or hot liquids, but not boiling liquids because it destroys the enzymes; I believe this rationale could hold true for ume plum paste.

Alia
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 24, 2007, 2:41pm; Reply: 45
Quoted from Alia_Vo
I believe ume plum paste is used as a condiment in a similar manner in which miso is used.  It is advised that one should add miso to the end of cooking or once they have taken their cooking apparatus off of the stove burner.  It is commonly recommended that miso is added to warm or hot liquids, but not boiling liquids because it destroys the enzymes; I believe this rationale could hold true for ume plum paste.

Alia


I thank-u Alia, that's what I do now !!;D :)
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Friday, May 18, 2007, 11:36pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from LISALEA


I saw the other day at the store I work in has dried red plums.  Do you think I could use these in place of the fresh plums?  
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, May 18, 2007, 11:53pm; Reply: 47
You might be able to try them, if you do not end up with pickled ume plums, you will have at least attempted to make pickled red plums--if in fact they are entirely two different food items. 

I just want to clarify that what was in the store was small red plums and not dates, which is commonly used and sold in Asian supermarkets to be used in desserts, herbal remedies, snacks, porridges, congee, et al.

And thank you, Lisalea for posting the homemade recipe for pickled ume plums.

I hope someone will try this recipe at home and report back to us.


Alia
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Saturday, May 19, 2007, 12:02am; Reply: 48
I did make the recipe and the plums I used were bigger then normal plums for ume plums so I cut them in half and followed the recipe using lemon juice instead of the sake.  I then took them to my friend's house and we compared her ume plums to my homemade ume pickled plums....the conclusion was they tasted the same, the homemade was a bit saltier....just a tiny bit.  It was super delicious.  I now want to try the tiny dried red plums and see if they turn out just the same or even better!  :)
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, May 19, 2007, 12:13am; Reply: 49
Cathy,
I am glad to hear that the recipe turned out well.  Did you use fresh plums or dried red plums?  

The notion of substituting lemon juice for the sake was a good decision for blood type A's.

Alia
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Saturday, May 19, 2007, 12:50am; Reply: 50
The plums I used I had frozen for about a year.  So when they thawed out they looked like they were already cooked.  So I cut them to be smaller portions.  I saw these dried red plums today and thought they may work out better than what I did before.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, May 19, 2007, 1:59am; Reply: 51
Thank you; I was not if you used fresh or dried plums.

I have a strong sense that either options would work pretty well in this recipe.

Alia
Posted by: 1328 (Guest), Saturday, May 19, 2007, 5:24pm; Reply: 52
You're welcome, Alia.  :)  I bought the bag of small dried red plums and I got fresh lemons to do my pickleing!  I'll let you know how these turn out.
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