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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Uniodized versus Iodized salt
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 4:41pm
Which seasalt r people using; especially B's ? ;)
Thank-u very much  ;D
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 5:53pm; Reply: 1
I'm not a B, but I really like RealSalt sea salt.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 6:37pm; Reply: 2
I use soft grey unraffinied seasalt from the atlantic sea
- and pink himalayan salt.
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 9:14pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
I use soft grey unraffinied seasalt from the atlantic sea
- and pink himalayan salt.




:o Sounds so interesting actually I've never even heard of those ...
Is it Uniodized or Iodized ... is it specified ?? TY ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 9:16pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from outdoordrea
I'm not a B (duh) but I really like RealSalt sea salt.


Thanks Drea ;)
I've heard that  kosher-certified sea salt is excellent !!  ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 9:47pm; Reply: 5
I use the Himalayan Crystal Salt or Celtic Sea Salt.  You can Google search on both of those and get an eye-opener about what makes salt healthy or unhealthy.
Posted by: italybound, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 10:13pm; Reply: 6
I use all of the above. I switch around just for variety but I love the Himalayan salt. I did just pick up a bit of red salt (Alaea Hawaiian)last week and only a bit, as it was very expensive!! :o http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Alaea+Hawaiian&btnG=Google+Search
Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 10:55pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from pkarmeier
I use all of the above. I switch around just for variety but I love the Himalayan salt. I did just pick up a bit of red salt (Alaea Hawaiian)last week and only a bit, as it was very expensive!!  :ohttp://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Alaea+Hawaiian&btnG=Google+Search


Thanks !!
Balance/variety is good  ;D

Red salt (Alaea Hawaiian)? Interesting ...
I came across this really beautiful site a few minutes ago  ;)
http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_gourmet_reference.asp

Posted by: Lisalea, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 10:56pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Victoria
I use the Himalayan Crystal Salt or Celtic Sea Salt.  You can Google search on both of those and get an eye-opener about what makes salt healthy or unhealthy.


That interests me immensely, TY Victoria;D
Posted by: Connect, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 11:07pm; Reply: 9
I use Redman's Real Salt.  Iodized....my body needs the iodine.........
Posted by: italybound, Thursday, March 1, 2007, 11:49pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from LISALEA
.
I came across this really beautiful site a few minutes ago  ;)
http://www.saltworks.us/salt_info/si_gourmet_reference.asp


wow great site Zuki!!!!!  :K)   will have to bookmark that!
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 2, 2007, 12:36am; Reply: 11
Quoted from connect14
I use Redman's Real Salt.  Iodized....my body needs the iodine.........


I imagine that people that do NOT eat canned foods could use Iodine come to think about it
;)
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 2, 2007, 12:38am; Reply: 12
Quoted from pkarmeier


wow great site Zuki!!!!!  :K)   will have to bookmark that!


;D ;) :)
Posted by: Vicki, Friday, March 2, 2007, 2:24am; Reply: 13
Iodine is plentiful in seaweeds such as kelp.  As such a dash of kelp here and there is helpful.
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Friday, March 2, 2007, 3:19am; Reply: 14
My chiropractor had an "education" night about salt  and water about a year ago.  A lot of information was based on a book written about the benefit of having healthy salt.  Unfortunately, I don't know where my notes are and don't remember the name of the book.  Evidently a good salt helps in the metabolic functions of the body.  I no longer use regular table salt or cheap sea salt (10 cents a pound).  

My chiropractor recommended Redmond's Real Salt, as others have noted they use.  So, I use that sometimes.

I also went to our local health food store which carries high quality salts in bulk.  That way I can purchase a small amount and store it in a little salt shaker.  Currently I have Celtic Sea Salt, Brittany Sea Salt, Sea Salt from Portugal, and Tropical Sea Salt.  They run about $7-$9/pound.

I love to fix a crisp romaine salad with vegetables, lemon juice, and olive oil.  Then I sprinkle one of salts, such as Brittany or Tropical salt on top.  To me they add a delightful flavor to a salad.  I miss pepper as a seasoning, and these salts help to compensate.

For baking, I also use Trader Joe's sea salt and kosher salt and sometimes Trade Winds from Smart & Final, although I am not sure of their quality.
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, March 2, 2007, 2:08pm; Reply: 15
REAL Sea Salt has Iodine.

Table Salt is essentially a mixture of just the elements Sodium and Chlorine {NaCl} and invariably some Talc and Cornstarch. Which completely lacks ALL of the minerals in Sea Salt - thus the reason to add the Iodine into it...

India and Korea also have 'Black Salt' which includes the ash of various plants, a very tasty salt.
Cultures that don't traditionally have access to Sea Water use ashes for a salt substitute and value as gold the few Salt Springs they have.

Personally I don't advocate Redmond's RealSalt for internal consumption - as it is not Sun-Dried.
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 2, 2007, 2:23pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Schluggell
REAL Sea Salt has Iodine.

Table Salt is essentially a mixture of just the elements Sodium and Chlorine {NaCl} and invariably some Talc and Cornstarch. Which completely lacks ALL of the minerals in Sea Salt - thus the reason to add the Iodine into it...

India and Korea also have 'Black Salt' which includes the ash of various plants, a very tasty salt.
Cultures that don't traditionally have access to Sea Water use ashes for a salt substitute and value as gold the few Salt Springs they have.

Personally I don't advocate Redmond's RealSalt for internal consumption - as it is not Sun-Dried.




Hi, Which would u recommend ??  ;)
I live in Canada  ;)

TY  ;D
Posted by: Lisalea, Friday, March 2, 2007, 2:23pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
My chiropractor had an "education" night about salt  and water about a year ago.  A lot of information was based on a book written about the benefit of having healthy salt.  Unfortunately, I don't know where my notes are and don't remember the name of the book.  Evidently a good salt helps in the metabolic functions of the body.  I no longer use regular table salt or cheap sea salt (10 cents a pound).  

My chiropractor recommended Redmond's Real Salt, as others have noted they use.  So, I use that sometimes.

I also went to our local health food store which carries high quality salts in bulk.  That way I can purchase a small amount and store it in a little salt shaker.  Currently I have Celtic Sea Salt, Brittany Sea Salt, Sea Salt from Portugal, and Tropical Sea Salt.  They run about $7-$9/pound.

I love to fix a crisp romaine salad with vegetables, lemon juice, and olive oil.  Then I sprinkle one of salts, such as Brittany or Tropical salt on top.  To me they add a delightful flavor to a salad.  I miss pepper as a seasoning, and these salts help to compensate.

For baking, I also use Trader Joe's sea salt and kosher salt and sometimes Trade Winds from Smart & Final, although I am not sure of their quality.



If u ever find ur notes, it would interest me, Thank-u very much  ;) ;D
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 2:59am; Reply: 18
I utilize Celtic Sea Salt (fine ground).  

Adding various types of seaweeds to your food is another option for substituting salt in your meals.

Alia
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 4:13am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Schluggell
REAL Sea Salt has Iodine.


Personally I don't advocate Redmond's RealSalt for internal consumption - as it is not Sun-Dried.



Thanks for the valuable information.  Can you please tell me why sun drying is important for internal consumption.  I notice that my Trader Joe's sea salt says it is sun dried.  
Posted by: shells, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 12:26pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Schluggell
REAL Sea Salt has Iodine.

Thank you Schluggell never knew this  :D

I've been having Celtic Sea Salt but switching  back to iodised table salt now & then in the belief of being iodine deficient without it !!   :X
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 2:41pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Alia_Vo
Adding various types of seaweeds to your food is another option for substituting salt in your meals.
Alia


Great suggestion !!
Thank-u ;D ;)
Posted by: italybound, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 2:41pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from shells
I've been having Celtic Sea Salt but switching  back to iodised table salt now & then in the belief of being iodine deficient without it !!   :X


shells, as I dont believe I've welcomed you before............warm welcome to BTD and the forum. :-)
Even if Celtic Sea Salt didnt have iodine, it would be much healthier to find iodine from some other source than reg table salt.  :)  My DH was really stubborn about switching for the same reason. Now, he's given up LOL and uses what I buy. :-)
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 3:25pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from pkarmeier


shells, as I dont believe I've welcomed you before............warm welcome to BTD and the forum. :-)
Even if Celtic Sea Salt didnt have iodine, it would be much healthier to find iodine from some other source than reg table salt.  :)  My DH was really stubborn about switching for the same reason. Now, he's given up LOL and uses what I buy. :-)



I agree ... we can find Iodine in bread, butter, cod, haddok, salmon, sardines, cottage cheese,  cheese, milk and dairy products in general, eggs ... fruits ... pineapple, raisins, meats, peanuts, peppers, spinach, etc ... all foods that we probably eat on a daily basis ...  ;) :) ;D
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 4:32pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from LISALEA
If u ever find ur notes, it would interest me, Thank-u very much  ;) ;D

I will keep looking.  In the meantime, this quote from the Internet carries the thought:
Salt is necessary matter for the human body. It is because salt exist in the body liquid, and has the important role of maintaining osmotic pressure. Human blood contains 0.9 % salt. If the salt is not enough in your body, then, you body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, so it decreases your appetite. In the short-term, because your body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, it decreases your appetite, but in the long-term, it will cause no-energy, fatigue, tiredness and anxiety in your body. If you lose salt suddenly by sweating a lot, you can loose physical and mental functions such as feeling dizziness, disinterest, unconsciousness and listlessness. The amount of salt your body needs depends on the amount of labor you perform and the weather, however, a normal adult needs 123g salt a day. If you eat too much salt, it can cause high blood pressure. This is because when the salt concentration is increased in your body, more water comes into your blood to maintain balanced concentration rate. Some people say if you eat too much salt, it can cause stomach cancer.


Posted by: italybound, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 6:36pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
Salt & Life
Salt is necessary matter for the human body. It is because salt exist in the body liquid, and has the important role of maintaining osmotic pressure. Human blood contains 0.9 % salt. If the salt is not enough in your body, then, you body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, so it decreases your appetite. In the short-term, because your body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, it decreases your appetite, but in the long-term, it will cause no-energy, fatigue, tiredness and anxiety in your body. If you lose salt suddenly by sweating a lot, you can loose physical and mental functions such as feeling dizziness, disinterest, unconsciousness and listlessness. The amount of salt your body needs depends on the amount of labor you perform and the weather, however, a normal adult needs 123g salt a day. If you eat too much salt, it can cause high blood pressure. This is because when the salt concentration is increased in your body, more water comes into your blood to maintain balanced concentration rate. Some people say if you eat too much salt, it can cause stomach cancer.
http://www.invil.org/english/tourism/themeTour/beach/contents.jsp?con_no=377406&page_no=1



TypeOSecretor, great info!! Must bookmark this page as well. And send it on to my mom.
Also in the book You: The Owners Manual (I think), it stresses the importance of salt as well, in that where salt is, water will follow and we all know how important water is for our health. :-)
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 8:07pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
I will keep looking.  In the meantime, this quote from the Internet carries the thought.


Thank-u that's very thoughtful ;D


Quoted from TypeOSecretor
Salt & Life
Salt is necessary matter for the human body. It is because salt exist in the body liquid, and has the important role of maintaining osmotic pressure. Human blood contains 0.9 % salt. If the salt is not enough in your body, then, you body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, so it decreases your appetite. In the short-term, because your body doesn't make enough digestive fluid, it decreases your appetite, but in the long-term, it will cause no-energy, fatigue, tiredness and anxiety in your body. If you lose salt suddenly by sweating a lot, you can loose physical and mental functions such as feeling dizziness, disinterest, unconsciousness and listlessness. The amount of salt your body needs depends on the amount of labor you perform and the weather, however, a normal adult needs 123g salt a day. If you eat too much salt, it can cause high blood pressure. This is because when the salt concentration is increased in your body, more water comes into your blood to maintain balanced concentration rate. Some people say if you eat too much salt, it can cause stomach cancer.
http://www.invil.org/english/tourism/themeTour/beach/contents.jsp?con_no=377406&page_no=1


Verrrrrrry interesting !! TY  ;D
Posted by: jillthepilllady, Saturday, March 3, 2007, 9:39pm; Reply: 27
Check ingredients on Salt containers.  The ones I've looked at with Iodine also have corn starch added to prevent caking since the Iodine has moisture to it.
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 1:31am; Reply: 28
I use Himalayan Crystal salt which is course and has 84 natural elements including iodine.  I also use Trader Joe’s Mediterranean Sea Salt which has fine crystals.  The only ingredient is salt, but the label mentions after drying in the sun the water is evaporated maximizing magnesium and iodide content.
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:36pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from jillthepilllady
Check ingredients on Salt containers.  The ones I've looked at with Iodine also have corn starch added to prevent caking since the Iodine has moisture to it.


Uhoh  corn starch is a NO-NO :-/ :'(
Yes, indeed we must look but at times I hear that they don't even list all the ingredients in full ... who knows  ??) :-/

Thanks :)
Posted by: Lisalea, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:37pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Arlene
I use Himalayan Crystal salt which is course and has 84 natural elements including iodine.  I also use Trader Joe’s Mediterranean Sea Salt which has fine crystals.  The only ingredient is salt, but the label mentions after drying in the sun the water is evaporated maximizing magnesium and iodide content.


Nothing is 100% anymore ... sigh ... Thanks for the info

;D
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 10:52pm; Reply: 31
I think we need a salt expert.  I am not one, but I thought that trace amounts of natural minerals in a salt were beneficial.
Posted by: italybound, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 11:01pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
I thought that trace amounts of natural minerals in a salt were beneficial.


gosh, i cant see how it couldnt be as long as it is sun dried.   :-/
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, March 4, 2007, 11:17pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from TypeOSecretor
I thought that trace amounts of natural minerals in a salt were beneficial.


Yes, they are.  Did someone say something to make you think the trace minerals are not good for us?
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:06am; Reply: 34
Quoted from Victoria


Yes, they are.  Did someone say something to make you think the trace minerals are not good for us?


In a general sense, yes.  I felt that some earlier comments indicated that iodine in a salt was not good, so I jumped to the conclusion that iodine in salt was not good.  In fact, I think iodized salt (added unnaturally - and not occurring in nature) has been found not to be necessary because iodine occurs naturally enough in foods without adding any extra.  

I was looking at a label on some Redmond's RealSalt Salt.  The amount of Iodine is .002% and occurs naturally in the salt.  Other trace minerals (calcium, potassium, sulphur, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, managanese, copper and zinc) amount to about 1.7% of the total amount of the salt.  I suspect, but don't know for sure, that other natural salts may have a similar composition.

Redmond's RealSalt is not sun dried, and I still do not understand why sun drying is necessary, but maybe I will find out.

But then, maybe I should take it with a grain of salt.

Posted by: italybound, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:25am; Reply: 35
http://www.invil.org/english/tourism/themeTour/beach/contents.jsp?con_no=377406&page_no=1

I think someone else posted this in either this thread or another, but it's a good article. :-)
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:45am; Reply: 36
I just checked the label on my seasalt:

Kalas Classic
Sea salt/Iodized

Ingredients: Sea salt, potassium iodide, potassium ferrocyanide.
Vacumed refined. ??)
Posted by: RedLilac, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:47am; Reply: 37
very interesting
Posted by: Schluggell, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:06pm; Reply: 38
Sun-Dried Sea Salt is very important - As these will be Hygroscopic.
Be very wary of any "Sundried" that is Pure White - as it probably is not.
I'll refrain from mentioning brands here.

The way to tell: Mix a spoonful of salt into a glass of water. If the crystals settle back out you know that it has been dried at too high of heat {Kiln-dried}.
This changes the molecular structure of the crystal itself {Tempering} which makes it essentially a sand...

Seawater has in it dissolved all of the minerals {H2O is the solvent of the world}

Issues come into play now, as oceans are polluted - And I have yet to try the Himalayan myself.
Celtic/Brittany salts or the Algarve Salts of Portugal are good - As the Crystals look moist {Hygroscopic}. Another salt that can do this is Dead Sea Salt.

We are built from water - not rocks.
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 5, 2007, 12:36pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Schluggell
Sun-Dried Sea Salt is very important - As these will be Hygroscopic.
Be very wary of any "Sundried" that is Pure White - as it probably is not.
I'll refrain from mentioning brands here.

The way to tell: Mix a spoonful of salt into a glass of water. If the crystals settle back out you know that it has been dried at too high of heat {Kiln-dried}.
This changes the molecular structure of the crystal itself {Tempering} which makes it essentially a sand...

Seawater has in it dissolved all of the minerals {H2O is the solvent of the world}

Issues come into play now, as oceans are polluted - And I have yet to try the Himalayan myself.
Celtic/Brittany salts or the Algarve Salts of Portugal are good - As the Crystals look moist {Hygroscopic}. Another salt that can do this is Dead Sea Salt.

We are built from water - not rocks.



I can't seem to find these salts here anywhere in the stores that I've been ... any recommendations in Canada on the above salts that u do recommend ? Thanks ;D
Posted by: italybound, Monday, March 5, 2007, 3:02pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from LISALEA
I can't seem to find these salts here anywhere in the stores that I've been ... any recommendations in Canada on the above salts that u do recommend ? Thanks ;D


Most of these salts can be purchased online, if that helps. :-)
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 4:03pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from Schluggell
Personally I don't advocate Redmond's RealSalt for internal consumption - as it is not Sun-Dried.


I wonder how they do dry it, then, because the bag that I have says "Unlike most table salts, RealSalt is not bleached, kiln dried, heated, or altered with chemicals or pollutants."
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 4:20pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from outdoordrea
...how they do dry it, then,..

Its been buried under pressure for eons - In other words it is mined.
Like the Himalayan.

I've the my above-mentioned Salts in Vancouver years past - a quick Googling revealed a Winnipeg Mailorder: http://www.eatit.ca

Though it is odd there were more refernces to recipedes than actually able to purchase.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 4:49pm; Reply: 43
Thanks for clarifying, Schluggell.
Posted by: Lisalea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 9:12pm; Reply: 44
Quoted from pkarmeier


Most of these salts can be purchased online, if that helps. :-)


TY :) ;D
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 9:30pm; Reply: 45
I feel more comforted about the salts I use now.  I did the "salt in water" test.  

All of my salts dissolved within 1-15 minutes.

What surprised me was that Redmond's Real Salt was the only one that dissolved instantly, and it is not sun dried.  There were a few remaining brown flecks that settled to the bottom of the glass and did not dissolve, so I called the company.  They stated their salt came from ancient sea beds and had 50 different minerals.  They said a few minerals do not dissolve in water.  What I was probably seeing was silica, they said.  It makes sense to me.

Several of the other salts, such as Celtic, Brittany, and Portugese also had a few flecks of minerals that did not dissolve.

Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 9:39pm; Reply: 46
Well, I like RealSalt and I'm sticking with it. Thanks for sharing the results of your tests, TOS.
Posted by: italybound, Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 11:05pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from Schluggell
Its been buried under pressure for eons - In other words it is mined.
Like the Himalayan. .


Is this a bad thing?  ;)
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