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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Bitter Collards?
Posted by: 1213 (Guest), Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 4:20pm
I finally decided to give collards a try.  I had to buy commercial, not organic ones (which is why it tok me so long to try them).  I remember MoDon saying they had to be cooked a really long time, so I picked a recipe out of a slow-cooker book (aka Crock Pot).  It called for onion, garlic, olive oil and water.  They cooked all day.

They're okay, but came out a little bitter. :P

Did I do something wrong or is that the way they are?  Someone on another thread suggested putting meat bones in, but as I am cooking for type A's as well as myself, I don't want to do that.  Any other suggestions would be appreciated!

Robin
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 4:24pm; Reply: 1
according to some, there are no lectins in beef broth for type As.....
contrary to chicken stock for Bs, to give an example......
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 4:29pm; Reply: 2
After 5 years of cooking collard greens I now only cook mine with water and they come out sweet. I serve them with olive oil. I don't buy organic either, partially because they are seldom available here.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 5:09pm; Reply: 3
try cooking them on top of the stove for say, 15 min or so, taste, then cook longer if needed....they may taste different at different cook times....we haven't got unanimity on this yet...
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 5:18pm; Reply: 4
I always steam mine (have never found organic up this way) and don't find them bitter...although I don't care too much for sweet taste.  Olive oil or ghee with them.

Debra :)
Posted by: Gumby, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 5:38pm; Reply: 5
I love collard greens.  They are one of those foods I had never eaten prior to btd and what a delightful discovery! :D  

I never cook mine for long, usually a couple of minutes to a max of maybe 8 or 10 min?  I will either toss them in/over cooking grains in the last couple of minutes, or else stir fry on top of the stove...just til wilted and juicy.  I've not had bitter ones or overly sweet.  

The ones I get are organic, not sure if that makes a difference.  Oddly, organic are the only kind I can get here, our organic coop is the only place that sells them.  They are not quite the dietary staple up here in the north as they are in the south I guess?  Anyway, they are delicious! :D
Posted by: Vicki, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 5:44pm; Reply: 6
Beef broth definitely doesn't sit well with me even if there are no lectins.  
Posted by: macawluver, Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 6:04pm; Reply: 7
I also steam mine with some other veggies for about 10-15 minutes or so and I find them delicious.  :)
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 1:35am; Reply: 8
Part of it is just adpting/getting used to the collards. When I first started eating collards a year ago, it took a long cook much like MoDon's for me to enjoy them and to have a shot at digesting them. Anymore they are fine steamed just enough to get rid of the 'green' taste, still slightly chewy and digest fine.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 1:49am; Reply: 9
I prefer my collards with the spine cut out, and cooking only the leafy part.  Not a big deal, but I like the flavor better.

If the leaves are very mature, they could have a stronger flavor than younger plants.  So don't give up on them.  You may find that at different times, they will taste differently.
Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 3:40am; Reply: 10
Victoria...use the spines to make a soup along with maybe some broccoli stems, swiss chard stems, beet greens, onions, celery, garlic, some spice.  Whip it up in the blender or hand whipper...yummilicious. :D

Debra :)
Posted by: Eric, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 4:25am; Reply: 11
Oh baby, I'm glad there's another post about collards... I just made the most amazing collard dish & posted my recipe on Typebase- though it has yet to appear.   Cut collards into 1/2 inch strips and cut up a bunch of portabello mushroom caps, put it in a pan with ghee, garlic, and chicken broth.  Cook until everything is all limp and dark.  Eat w/sea salt.  It's awesome, 'cause the mushrooms take away the bitter taste.  I've never really liked collards either (except for the crock pot method which is great), but there's something about this combination of collards and portabello mushrooms.   IMO.
Posted by: Alek, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 11:29am; Reply: 12

I steam mine with cut up sweet potato, and it is soft after 15 min.

The dressing is olive oil and a spoonful of fresh lime juice.

Wonderful taste.

alek
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, February 22, 2007, 7:13pm; Reply: 13
I believe prolonged cooking of collards can lend them to the bitter side.

Look for younger leaves and a smaller bunch.  I usually buy younger leaves and the collard greens leaves are not bitter and can be eaten raw, if inclined.

Alia
Posted by: 1213 (Guest), Saturday, February 24, 2007, 12:07am; Reply: 14
I think these were fairly mature leaves, although not having bought them before, I couldn't say for sure.  They aren't hideously bitter, just a little too bitter to eat without some other strong tasting food.  I've got a whole pot full to eat.  So far, I've mixed them with turkey mole sauce,  (not the underground animal, the mexican chili and chocolate concoction, say MO-lay) and in a sweet potato soup.  I'll have to try them with portabellos!  Too bad I threw out the spines.  I have a whole bunch of broccoli stems just waiting to be turned into something good.

So far, I haven't found any way to feed the collards to my cooked-vegetable-hating, type A family, though. No sweet potatoes or chilis for them!

Robin
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, February 24, 2007, 12:23am; Reply: 15
Quoted from linnsmama
So far, I haven't found any way to feed the collards to my cooked-vegetable-hating, type A family, though. No sweet potatoes or chilis for them!


Try shredding them very thinly and very fine by hand or in a mixer/shredder.  Add a viniagrette or e.v.o.o. and serve.  Young leaves are very soft and they make a nice 'coleslaw' based-vegetable for a viniagrette or cream based dressing.

Alia

Posted by: Drea, Saturday, February 24, 2007, 2:03am; Reply: 16
Quoted from linnsmama
I have a whole bunch of broccoli stems just waiting to be turned into something good.


Shredded broccoli stems and shredded kale, with half evoo and half lemon or lime juice and a squirt or two of agave, is just one of my favorite foods. I call it kale slaw (though I cannot say that I coined that phrase).
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, February 24, 2007, 11:57pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Gumby
I never cook mine for long, usually a couple of minutes to a max of maybe 8 or 10 min?  I will either toss them in/over cooking grains in the last couple of minutes, or else stir fry on top of the stove...just til wilted and juicy.  I've not had bitter ones or overly sweet.  

The ones I get are organic, not sure if that makes a difference.


I made collards for the second time ever today, using a method very similar to Gumby's. The first time I tried MoDon's way of cooking them for over an hour, and they were just okay. But today I sliced the leaves into 1/4" strips and sauteed them in a cast iron pan with a little evoo for a couple of minutes; not even 8 or 10, probably more like 5-6 mins. Then I tossed on a bit of sea salt and they were delicious! Yum, I wish I had bought more than one bunch! Mine were not organic, but the leaves definitely seemed a bit younger than the last batch I tried. Also, I saved the stems for something else, and just ate the leaves.

I'm thrilled to have found yet another beneficial green that I like (the last one I finally took the plunge on was okra - one of my new favorite foods, btw).
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