Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Wrights Hickory Seasoning Liquid Smoke?
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Saturday, February 17, 2007, 5:10pm
I have an old post I printed out from someone who said that they use this Wrights Hickory Seasoning Liquid Smoke to make their ground beef jerky with.  

She mentioned it has no avoids.  Anybody know if it's ok for O Secretors?  I can't find a list of it's ingredients on the web anywhere.

Posted by: KimonoKat, Saturday, February 17, 2007, 5:14pm; Reply: 1
I'm surprised "smoke" is okay for O's.  I was under the impression smoked salmon was an avoid. ??)
Posted by: Don, Sunday, February 18, 2007, 3:51am; Reply: 2
Quoted from funkymuse
I have an old post I printed out from someone who said that they use this Wrights Hickory Seasoning Liquid Smoke to make their ground beef jerky with.

She mentioned it has no avoids.  Anybody know if it's ok for O Secretors?  I can't find a list of it's ingredients on the web anywhere.

I am pretty sure that beef jerky recipe was from me. And I am not a "she" the last time I checked.

Wright's Liquid Smoke
From the bottle I have the ingredients are water and natural hickory smoke concentrate. No obvious avoid ingredients, so the only remaining question is if the natural hickory smoke concentrate is safe to use. I will let you read and make up your own mind on the issue.
So should I say it's safe? Okay, I'll take the plunge. Yes, it's safe in the small amounts you'll encounter in smoke-flavored foods. So sayeth the FDA.

Real, gaseous smoke, however, is quite another story. The decomposition of wood (and tobacco and grilled steaks and hamburgers) by heat (Techspeak: pyrolysis) produces highly carcinogenic 3,4-benzopyrene and other so-called polycyclic aromatics. But none of these chemicals has been found in commercial liquid smoke products. On the other hand, liquid smoke, like its gaseous parent, contains bactericidal and antioxidant chemicals such as formic acid and phenolics that may even make a positive contribution to your health.

Most of us are aware of the hazards associated with smoking or grilling foods, including the formation of compounds that may cause cancer. However, commercially prepared liquid smoke does not contain the potentially carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons or nitrosamines that accumulate on traditionally smoked or grilled foods. Although these are found in wood smoke, they must be removed in order to meet rigorous manufacturing specifications. According to researchers at the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph, “The risk of a carcinogenic response is essentially nil because current specifications limit the level of benzo(a)pyrene.” The hardwoods used to produce the product also must be free of pesticides, preservatives, and any extraneous matter that could result in the formation of potentially hazardous components.

The use of liquid smoke may even work to one’s health advantage since it tends to decrease cooking time, thereby reducing food exposure to carcinogenic compounds created by the cooking process itself. Reduced outdoor cooking time also reduces the amount of particulate matter released into the atmosphere by the grilling or smoking process.

Interestingly, liquid smoke retains the anti-microbial properties that made smoking a food preservation method in the past. As a result, it is actually used by some processors as a food safety tool to inhibit bacterial growth.

http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/2006/11/29/living/16121076.htm
http://www.inchem.org/documents/jecfa/jecmono/v22je07.htm
I suggest you do more searching and reading on the topic.

I don't use it very often and I don't use very much. In fact, I can't remember the last time I used it.
Posted by: Vicki, Sunday, February 18, 2007, 1:52pm; Reply: 3
Have any new jerky recipes to share?
Posted by: 1323 (Guest), Sunday, February 18, 2007, 2:02pm; Reply: 4
That was a post I had printed out and put in my pile of recpies quite some time back.  It did not have any indication of male/female author on it.  So please don't take offense.  Plus who knows?  A MoDon could be a female nickname.. I don't think our posting identifiers give any indication of our sex.

But other than all that, thanks so much for the info!

I know that if one uses the smoke, that they don't have to use but a tiny amount so in that light, it might be ok to use occasionally in a jerky recipe.
Posted by: Don, Monday, February 19, 2007, 2:19am; Reply: 5
Quoted from Vicki
Have any new jerky recipes to share?

No, I don't have any new recipes. My sons seem to prefer my original recipe versus anything else I have tried.
Posted by: Don, Monday, February 19, 2007, 2:23am; Reply: 6
Quoted from funkymuse
That was a post I had printed out and put in my pile of recpies quite some time back.  It did not have any indication of male/female author on it.  So please don't take offense.  Plus who knows?  A MoDon could be a female nickname.. I don't think our posting identifiers give any indication of our sex.

No problem.  ;)

You can check a members profile information to see if they have indicated their gender, which I have. That is something I ask new members to do to avoid confusion.
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, February 20, 2007, 8:59am; Reply: 7
Quoted from KimonoKat
I'm surprised "smoke" is okay for O's.  I was under the impression smoked salmon was an avoid. ??)


That fake looking Red Fish in the store is not really smoked with anything other than a chemical wash and Salt.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Tuesday, February 20, 2007, 4:58pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Schluggell


That fake looking Red Fish in the store is not really smoked with anything other than a chemical wash and Salt.


But I do see "Wild" salmon products that are not misrepresented, that say they are smoked.  It may be more along the lines of how MoDon is seeing it.  If all the ingredients in the smoking process are okay, the product is okay.
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, February 20, 2007, 5:11pm; Reply: 9
Yeah I agree too!

Just there is a few people paranoid about carcinogens in food cooked over a grill.
And with a Hot Smoke process you will get more of this than with a Cold Smoke product.

A 'Little Chief' Smoker or the the 50s Fridge, is an example of a 'Hot Smoke'.
The Native American Smokehouse is between the two methods.
I'm not sure if I can recall any real American/English 'Cold Smoke' products, especially with the modern concerns of having meat get up to a certain temperature.
Print page generated: Friday, December 19, 2014, 10:51am