Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Butter?? ---->Ghee
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 3:27pm
I am sure that there is an answer to this question in here somewhere, but as a newbie, I thought it quicker to ask.

As a Type O, I can see that I should aviod all Dairy products, but butter seems allowed. Anyone know why?

OH and I started 4 days ago  (He is a B) after meeting with friends in Florida. We have come back to the UK and everyone we have told about this is really enthusiastic!
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 3:41pm; Reply: 1
ArtyMiss, warm welcome to BTD and the forum!!
I can't give you an answer really on why butter is allowed, but someone else will be along who can. I would like to suggest making it into ghee tho. It is very good for us in that form. Very simple to make as well.  
Put  your butter in a baking dish (with a cover), set oven to 350, set your timer for an hour. Go do whatever your little heart desires. When timer goes off, check to see that your butter is clear. I cook mine at least 10 min longer as I like mine a little darker, gives it a dif (better - to me) flavor. The stuff on top, skim off (this can be used to flavor other things). Strain the liquid, throw the stuff from this away. Ghee can be left on the counter, but be sure not to put wet or dirty utensils in it. When I say dirty, I mean as in - you use a spoon to dip some ghee, use the same spoon to stir your oatmeal - do not use this same spoon to dip more ghee, get a clean one. :-)  Ghee is very tasty!! :-)
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 3:51pm; Reply: 2
Thanks for the tip! I did go & buy organic butter to try to be as good as possible.

How long does the Ghee last once made?

I hate that when someone uses a dirty knife in the butter. I make OH have his own butter tub as he always ends up with crumbs in there!
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 3:54pm; Reply: 3
ArtyMiss...Welcome to the forum and the BTD way of life.  I don't have an answer either for the butter question.  Tried looking it up in my books, but can't seem to find anything.

I am with italybound and the ghee.  Wonderful stuff.    'Like putting candy on your veggies.'  And sooooo easy to make.  You can buy it in some countries already made.  Not Canada...as far as I know anyhow.

Great that you are both doing the BTD way of life and that you are spreading the word.   Any more questions just ask...someone will be here to help you out.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Debra
Posted by: rustyc, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 4:13pm; Reply: 4
Nice to have another UKite aboard - we seem to be a bit thin on the ground.  ASDA sell ghee but it is more expensive and so simple to make it's not worth buying ready made.  I put off making it for ages - now I wonder why!
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 4:16pm; Reply: 5
Hi Rustyc,

Isn't it hard to get all the right stuff here in the UK? I have managed to get some stuff from Waitrose & Tesco, but would welcome any shopping tips (especially online ones!). Have you found the sprouted wheat bread anywhere?
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 4:18pm; Reply: 6
Welcome ArtyMiss,

It's interesting that Live Right doesn't clarify which category of dairy that butter falls into.  Would it fall into the Milk and Yogurt category?  Here, you have 4-6oz for men 2-5oz for women & children and depending on if you are African, Caucasian or Asian, you can have this category 0-3 times per week.  It doesn't seem to me, that we would be allowed 5-6oz of butter a day, which leaves the cheese category.

Cheese, for Type O is 3oz men; 2oz women and children.  Now, depending on if you are a secretor or nonnie, and depending on your race, you can have cheese 0-2 times per week.  This seems like a more reasonable category to attach butter to.

So, cheese (and probably butter), in very small amounts and not on a daily basis appear to be okay for O secretors, and less so for O non-secretors.

However, when we look at any one of the Health Series books, ~for those targeting a specific illness, and trying to get well~ where food is broken down even further into five categories, (Super Beneficial, Beneficial, Neutral: Allowed Frequently, Neutral, Allowed Infrequently, and Avoid) butter gets downgraded to Neutral: Allowed Infrequently.  This category of foods in the Health Series books, Dr. D recommends eating no more than twice a month, or ideally, eliminate all together.

Taking into consideration that Ghee is extracted from butter and contains a good amount of butyric acid~an ideal food for the good bacteria in the colon~it stands to reason that one of the reasons that butter is a neutral is the fact that it, too, contains butyric acid.  But it also contains milk solids which are avoids for Type O's.  This is probably why the neutral classification.

I recommend reading up about Ghee on the forum, and on the web site itself.  Dr. D recommends Ghee for constipation in Type O's, and it has many healing benefits.

How to make Ghee.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 5:16pm; Reply: 7
try this for compliant bread in the uk
http://www.artisanbread.ltd.uk/

the churning process in butter gets rid of all the whey, this is the reason it is a neutral, as well as certain types of cheese.
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 5:32pm; Reply: 8
Thanks for the link Lola. Unfortunately the site doesn't seem to be working right now. But I'll check back later.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 5:37pm; Reply: 9
sorry to hear that!

you could try pming Dr Tom Greenfield, he might have the answer....
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/24/archives/
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 5:42pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from rustyc
 I put off making it for ages - now I wonder why!


LOL, me too rustyc!!  I was almost 'afraid'.  ::)   Now, I think how silly that was.....I have it made all the time. I almost cringe if I have to use butter.  ;)  LOL
Gotta get back to having some melted ghee first thing in the AM.  I just read it is good for constipation. Thanks for that info KK.  :K)  Could be one reason why I"m having the persistant headache.  :-/

ArtyMiss, the ghee will last for quite a long time. However, I doubt you'll ever have to worry about it going bad, as you'll prob have it gobbled up long before .  ;D
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 6:52pm; Reply: 11
OK I admit I am one of those afraid to make ghee....silly me. Haven't done it yet, but buy it at WF.  I bet I'll kick myself, or like the V-8 commercial, slap my forehead and say "I coulda been making ghee!"
Posted by: MyraBee, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 7:03pm; Reply: 12
Well, I've been avoiding mentioning this before, but janey-O you've given me courage!

I make ghee everyday in the microwave,

I take about 2-3 TBS of butter, put it in a pyrex measuring cup and microwave it for about 2.5 minutes, or a bit longer.

Yummy, and I don't have to worry about ruining a pound of butter.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 7:10pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from jayney-O
OK I admit I am one of those afraid to make ghee....silly me. Haven't done it yet, but buy it at WF.  I bet I'll kick myself, or like the V-8 commercial, slap my forehead and say "I coulda been making ghee!"


That brand that WF carries in their refrigerated dairy section is, (imho) cr@p.  Even thou it says it's organic.  We now get our ghee from Indian grocery stores.  Way, way better ghee, and 1/2 the cost.  I avoided making it myself too for a long time, but even this cooking challenged person who has burned up too many pans to count just boiling water has mastered making ghee at home.

Low, low heat is the key!
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 7:24pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from KimonoKat
Low, low heat is the key!


Unless you're doing it in the oven, then be sure to use 350. :-)
Posted by: Esmerelda, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 7:27pm; Reply: 15
MyraBee, I hate to sound moralising, but if I were you I'd avoid the use of microwaves as much as possible... Especially for regular everyday use. Five minutes of searching turns up links such as these. The last one is probably the most reliable, as it's from Nexus magazine.

http://www.gallawa.com/microtech/mwdanger.html

http://www.relfe.com/microwave.html

http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards.htm

http://www.mercola.com/article/microwave/hazards2.htm

There is probably a post about this somewhere, now I think about it...
Posted by: MyraBee, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 8:28pm; Reply: 16
Thanks, Esmerelda--I know you are right!

In fact, I've avoided even owning a microwave until this past year--but it has kept me from running out for a quick bite of fast food.


:-)
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 9:03pm; Reply: 17
the straining part...what do you use? (just pour the clarified butter off , I hope?)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 9:09pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from jayney-O
the straining part...what do you use? (just pour the clarified butter off , I hope?)


Whatever works best for you.  Some use paper coffee filters, some use many layers of cheese cloth.  We use a metal coffee filter.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 9:14pm; Reply: 19
thanks, I'm ready to try it.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 9:48pm; Reply: 20
I use a paper coffee filter here, the unbleached type. I even bought an enamel cannister for my ghee.
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 10:12pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from jayney-O
the straining part...what do you use? (just pour the clarified butter off , I hope?)


I use an unbleached coffee filter 'nestled' in a big strainer. Then I pour into a pretty yellow bowl that I bought just for my ghee. :-)

KK, where did you get that metal coffee filter?  I remember when we visited this subject before that you said Mr KK said there was a certain one (size hole) you/we should use. Thanks!  :K)

jayneyO - do it!!!  Hurry......let us know how it turns out..........you'll LOVE it!!  And wonder why ya didn't do it sooner. I know I did!! LOL

;)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 10:16pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from pkarmeier


I use an unbleached coffee filter 'nestled' in a big strainer. Then I pour into a pretty yellow bowl that I bought just for my ghee. :-)

KK, where did you get that metal coffee filter?  I remember when we visited this subject before that you said Mr KK said there was a certain one (size hole) you/we should use. Thanks!  :K)

jayneyO - do it!!!  Hurry......let us know how it turns out..........you'll LOVE it!!  And wonder why ya didn't do it sooner. I know I did!! LOL

;)


We buy the coffee filters that go in the coffee maker machines. They are a metal mesh, gold color, and work pretty good.  Through his various work related catalogs, (I think "GRAINGER") he found some mesh screen that's even smaller but they are not as easy to clean as the coffee filters.  They are about $10.00 each at Bed Bath & Beyond.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 10:30pm; Reply: 23
my ghee is real easy to filter once it has settled to cool .....the solids fall to the bottom of the pan, and pouring the pure melted ghee into a glass container is a breeze......a conventional strainer works for me, to catch any solid burned chunk happening to try and squeeze in.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, January 24, 2007, 11:44pm; Reply: 24
A natural, unbleached paper towel in a big metal strainer works just fine, too.  I don't eat any of the stuff that settles to the bottom or rises to the top.  
Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 12:18am; Reply: 25
I use cheese cloth and a metal strainer (which is a must to hole the cheese cloth in place) when pouring the ghee into containers.  Making some right now actually.    :D

Debra :)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 12:45am; Reply: 26
who eats that stuff anyway?
that s the purpose of making ghee....getting rid of all that solid junk.
Posted by: MyraBee, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 12:56am; Reply: 27
You mean I'm supposed to strain it???










;-)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 1:11am; Reply: 28
preferably, yes.......let it cool and you will see how it separates.

otherwise you are only having melted butter!
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:05am; Reply: 29
Also, Myra,
It needs to cook long enough for the milk solids to separate out from the butter oil, turn golden brown and sink to the bottom.  I use the stovetop method and it takes anywhere from 10 minutes to 20 minutes, depending on the brand of butter I use.  The whole house smells like popcorn from the ghee.  :-)
Posted by: italybound, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:06am; Reply: 30
FWIU, you can skim the stuff off the top and use it to flavor.....whatever, but the stuff the settles to the bottom is definitely for throw away. :-)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:20am; Reply: 31
I don t use the stuff on top, either.........it turns out the same color as the stuff on the bottom, in my batches of ghee, so far.......and it s only been 10 years. ;)
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:32am; Reply: 32
I'm under the impression that both the stuff on top and the stuff on the bottom are the unhealthy parts of butter.  The pure golden oil is the part that is good for us.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:37am; Reply: 33
besides, if you leave the ghee long enough, there s practically no scum left.

I just place the pan with the butter on low heat with a meshed top, so it won t splatter, and forget about the ghee.........around 40 mins later, I go back in the kitchen and turn the stove off.

there s no more noise and it smells heavenly!
Posted by: MyraBee, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:44am; Reply: 34
I really was just teasing about not knowing to strain it!   ;D   ;D    ;D

Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:49am; Reply: 35
silly girl!!  :-)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:11am; Reply: 36
what a relief Myra! LOL
Posted by: Poly, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 11:11am; Reply: 37
We always have ghee in the house. Always a batch of pure ghee for frying etc. and a batch of spreadable ghee for - well - spreading! :D
I use the stove-approach as well, and use the "ear-method" to determine if the ghee is finished. I simply listen to it - when it stops "talking" it's done! I strain the ghee though a cloth - I was too impatient for the coffee-filter-method... :)

I like the taste of ghee, but DH is more sceptical. He insists he can taste it form miles away! ::) ;) So on weekends he gets butter. :K)

DH surprised me the other day by making ghee. He had read something about it on the net and decided to try it out. To determine the water-content of the ghee (it should be zero) you dip a piece of kitchen-paper into the ghee and put in on fire. If it sizzles, it's not done yet. If it burns with an even flame, all water is gone and the ghee is ready to cool off. The ghee turned out very well.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 1:46pm; Reply: 38
Well I use ghee more and more
- but still eats butter- so does my kid ( O) on bread.
Just don´t like the texture of ghee- flavour is nice though.
BUT real dark yellow jersey butter in late spring is just jum..... and so is ghee made from it.
Posted by: italybound, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 2:24pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from Poly
To determine the water-content of the ghee (it should be zero) you dip a piece of kitchen-paper into the ghee and put in on fire..


What is kitchen paper?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 3:43pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from pkarmeier


What is kitchen paper?


It is a kind of paper - we danes get in large rolls - a bit like toilet paper- but tougher and not as soft.
Posted by: italybound, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:43pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
It is a kind of paper - we danes get in large rolls - a bit like toilet paper- but tougher and not as soft.


what would us folk in the US use?  ;) ;D
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:44pm; Reply: 42
Maybe toilet paper ;-D
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:49pm; Reply: 43
Kitchen Paper is available in the US, because I bought some a couple of weeks ago when I was in Florida. I got it in Publix.
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:50pm; Reply: 44
Have a look in the napkin aisle.
Posted by: rustyc, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 4:51pm; Reply: 45
 Artymiss, I managed to access the artisan site some time ago and the only outlets appear to be Scotland (Glasgow I think) and Southampton.  They do mail order but you have to order 6 loaves which is a lot for something one hasn't tried.  I haven't found any wheat free bread worth bothering with so I just stick with ryvita and rice cakes.  The savoury ones are nice.    I use the reeibos tea, which doesn't need milk, and am quite used to that now - I make it quite weak and one teabag lasts all day!  Fortunately I've never liked coffee so that wasn't a problem.  My biggest problem was making sauces and gravies.  If you read the thread on cream you will see I've cracked that one (if you can't find it let me know and I'll e-mail it to you) and I've found the best way with gravies is to stew a chicken carcase with veg and, if I can get them, chicken livers, remove the bones, addherbs or spices and liquidise the rest.  The veg. tend to thicken it and I then freeze it in ice cube trays and just take out what I need each day.  If theres anything you're particularly looking for let me know and, if I can help, I will.  Just be assured that one adjusts very quickly to living without some things and they cease to be a problem.  My first reaction when I read the book was 'but there's nothing to eat' so I guess I've come a long way in the last 9 months.
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:01pm; Reply: 46
Thanks rustyc!

About 15 years ago I used to manage a group of Heatlh Food shops selling everything I need now! In those days we were thought to be 'cranky'. I was actually based in Bracknell for a while (I see you are in Berks.) Now I am in Eastbourne & there is nothing available. I went to Sainsbury's today & came out with 2 carrier bags in place of the normal trolley load. I was longing to be back in Florida in Publix, where the choice was 100% better! That said, I don't seem hungry? 5 days in and I am feeling great!

I did find some Rye bread in waitrose, which seems fine. It makes a tiny snadwhich, but somehow that seems to be enough.

I bought a steamer today for my veggies after reading all the bad stuff about microwaves.
Posted by: Poly, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:04pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from pkarmeier
What is kitchen paper?

Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
It is a kind of paper - we danes get in large rolls - a bit like toilet paper- but tougher and not as soft.

Quoted from pkarmeier
what would us folk in the US use? :) ;D

Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Maybe toilet paper ;D

Quoted from ArtyMiss
Kitchen Paper is available in the US, because I bought some a couple of weeks ago when I was in Florida. I got it in Publix....Have a look in the napkin aisle.


OMG, I had no idea "kitchen paper" was such an exotic thing...!!! ;D ;D ;D Well, maybe I translated it wrong - I didn't know what to call it, really, so I just came up with something. It's called køkkenrulle in Danish! ;D
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:06pm; Reply: 48
We calli it Kitchen Towel here in the UK
Posted by: geminisue, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:14pm; Reply: 49
paper towels - bounty?
Posted by: ArtyMiss (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:16pm; Reply: 50
That's the stuff!
Posted by: Poly, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 5:17pm; Reply: 51
Quoted from ArtyMiss
We calli it Kitchen Towel here in the UK


Oh I see - you learn something new every day! :) Thanks!

Well, now DH tells me, you can use regular paper for the "fire-test"! 8)

Posted by: Mastre, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 7:15pm; Reply: 52
Well, I made my first attempt at ghee today. It was ready quicker than I expected and looked dark, so I first thought I had burnt it (insert Swedish curses here). Doesn't taste burnt though, so it's probably ok  8)
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 7:26pm; Reply: 53
It should be ok, especially if it doesn't taste burnt.

I believe some members on this forum cook their ghee to a point where the end color achieved is darker.  

Alia
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 7:45pm; Reply: 54
It seems to be a matter of taste.  When my ghee stops talking to me, I watch it really carefully because I like mine to be golden brown sediment with ghee that looks like liquid gold.  Occasionally the sediment gets dark brown and the ghee gets duller and darker, and I use it anyway.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, January 25, 2007, 8:33pm; Reply: 55
Quoted from Victoria
It seems to be a matter of taste.  When my ghee stops talking to me, I watch it really carefully because I like mine to be golden brown sediment with ghee that looks like liquid gold.  Occasionally the sediment gets dark brown and the ghee gets duller and darker, and I use it anyway.

The darker has a bit more caramel flavor and odor, but it is still usable.  I like it better yellow than brownish, but when you forget about it for too long, you gets it browner....LOL!
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Thursday, January 25, 2007, 9:06pm; Reply: 56
I just wanted to say: Hello! Paper towels....but someone already got it....
caramel flavor sounds mmmmmm!
Posted by: italybound, Friday, January 26, 2007, 3:09am; Reply: 57
Quoted from Mastre
Well, I made my first attempt at ghee today. It was ready quicker than I expected and looked dark, so I first thought I had burnt it (insert Swedish curses here). Doesn't taste burnt though, so it's probably ok  8)


LOL, well that was me one of my first times making ghee.  I was  :o  :o, as a lb of organic butter is none too cheap. Hopped right on here to see if everyone thought it was ok to use. Everyone said give it a try, if it tastes ok, use it. I tried it, it tasted ok, matter of fact better than when it is more yellow and have been making mine like that since. I really love the taste when the color is a bit more on the caramelly  ;) side. Ghee.........yummy!!!!!!!!!!!!   Like has been said on the site..........like putting candy on your veggies. The smell of it cooking is just heavenly. :-)
jayney-O, if the caramelly flavor/look sounds good to you, do give it a try. Think ya might like it.  ;D
Posted by: Don, Friday, January 26, 2007, 10:54pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from Mastre
Well, I made my first attempt at ghee today. It was ready quicker than I expected and looked dark, so I first thought I had burnt it (insert Swedish curses here).

You might want to try using a lower heat next time so that it cooks slower and therefore you don't have to watch it very carefully to see if it is done versus overcooked.

Print page generated: Saturday, October 25, 2014, 4:49am