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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Sub for all-dairy heavy cream - for O's
Posted by: lblackbu, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 2:41pm
Can anyone give me a Sub for all-dairy heavy cream that O's can have?
Posted by: KimonoKat, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 3:37pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from lblackbu
Can anyone give me a Sub for all-dairy heavy cream that O's can have?


Unsweetened soy or rice or almond milk.  That's about it.  If a nonnie, I believe soy is out.
Posted by: Don, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 4:11pm; Reply: 2
Cook's Thesaurus: Milk & Cream suggest silken tofu as one possibility that would be OK for type O secretors, but it really depends on what you need it for or are trying to make.
Posted by: koahiatamadl, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 5:14pm; Reply: 3
I remember reading a thread where somebody had experimented with homemade mayonnaise and made a sweet version....if you just want it as topping as opposed to cook with it that might work.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Saturday, January 13, 2007, 6:08pm; Reply: 4
I would suggest using soft goat cheese, chevre, maybe thinned down with fruit juice, or soy milk. I have used it as cream in a dessert with fresh figs...just thinned it down with white wine and honey...
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 6:36pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from koahiatamadl
I remember reading a thread where somebody had experimented with homemade mayonnaise and made a sweet version....if you just want it as topping as opposed to cook with it that might work.



I often dip fruit in mayo so I could see how this would work
Posted by: Gee Whiz, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 7:53pm; Reply: 6
Someone once suggested tahini as a thickener for soups and sauces.
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 8:14pm; Reply: 7
There are lots of things you can use the question is what do you want to use it for
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 9:24pm; Reply: 8
I think your heavy cream substitution would vary dependent upon if you wanted to use the heavy cream for a sweet or savory dish.  

All of the aforementioned suggestions would be ideas to start experimenting with.  For a sweet heavy cream, just add your desired sweetener of choice that you can tolerate: agave syrup, vegetable glycerine, maple syrup, et al.

Please let us know what you try and how it turns out!

Alia
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 10:33pm; Reply: 9
If I use cream in gravies like cream of mushrooms- I use ricemilk + complient starch and a big dollop of butter just before serving if I make sweet creams/ custards I use almondmilk, starch and butter.
For cold servings like whipped cream- very fatty almond cream can be beaten as a loose whipped cream.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Saturday, January 13, 2007, 10:38pm; Reply: 10
very fatty almond cream? Henriette, this sounds miraculous! and good...how is it done?
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 10:51pm; Reply: 11
Well I put some almonds in water over night- next day I skin them.
Put them in the blender with new water - I use less than when I made almond milk- Start with very little and add more and more.
It can make a very loose foam like/ whipped cream like thing- but it has to be used right away !
It works fine on cakes or fruitdessert.
It is not whipped cream but it looks a bit like it and has a lovely flavour.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, January 13, 2007, 11:52pm; Reply: 12
here s one suggestion:
Quoted Text
cream
1 egg in liquidiser or blender, add 2
tablespoons lemon juice, 1-2 tablespoons honey
(according to taste).  Give it a whizz and
gradually add about 1/2 pint light olive oil.
 So quick and easy.  Exactly the same for
mayonnaise except you can add salt and mustard
instead of the honey.
Posted by: rustyc, Sunday, January 14, 2007, 2:32pm; Reply: 13
¼ pint soya milk (I expect you could use any other sort of compliant milk)
¼ lb unsalted butter
½ teaspoon powdered gelatine.

Heat altogether gently to dissolve the gelatine and melt the butter.  Remove from the heat and cool to blood heat.  Pour into liquidiser and blend for one minute on maximum speed.  Pour cream into another container and allow to stand several hours in a cool place.  The cream is cheap, easy to make and is an excellent substitute for fresh cream of thick pouring consistency.

This is a very old Kenwood recipe - doesn't appear in current Kenwood books.   I found, after two hours in the fridge, this was like extra thick cream but otherwise you wouldn't know the difference.  I left the milk/cream mix on the heat and when I came back it was curdled but all straightened out in the liquidiser.  Might try it with more milk than butter for a pouring consistency.  Will add to recipe index.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 15, 2007, 2:10am; Reply: 14
thanks for sharing!
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Monday, January 15, 2007, 7:48am; Reply: 15
great, rusty, but something tells me I would know the difference...lol!
Posted by: rustyc, Monday, January 15, 2007, 4:00pm; Reply: 16
I wasn't aware of it tasting different - I was just so pleased to find it again.  How much difference could you accept??  If you haven't had real cream (which is just fatty milk I suppose) for some time any difference would likely be less noticable.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Monday, January 15, 2007, 7:07pm; Reply: 17
hmmm, with all that butter, you might be right!! now that you put it that way it does sound pretty creamlike...
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, January 15, 2007, 7:41pm; Reply: 18
These are some great suggestions.  (I have a feeling none of them would work like heavy cream in a cup of hot beverage.)  :-)
Posted by: rustyc, Thursday, January 18, 2007, 4:09pm; Reply: 19
Made some more cream today but with 3oz ordinary butter, 6 fl. oz of soya milk and the same ½ teaspoon gelatine.  After one hour in the 'fridge it was a thick pouring consistency but within about 3 hours it was fairly stiff - in fact it looked quite spongy but a stir reduced it to it's normal consistency.  I would think the ordinary butter is OK if you want it for sauces or soups (must admit I haven't tried either of these yet) but the unsalted is probably better for dessert purposes.  Having said that I had some with a banana today and it was OK.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 18, 2007, 4:15pm; Reply: 20
sounds like you can make a mouse out of it, adding chocolate, or fruit.......yummmm!!
Posted by: TypeOSecretor, Thursday, January 18, 2007, 4:38pm; Reply: 21
If I want to make a cream-like sauce for something like a crustless Chicken Pot Pie (or crusted), I make a roux of equal parts butter (or ghee) and spelt flour (maybe 3 T ea).  After cooking the roux, I add a cup or two of homemade chicken broth, homemade vegetable stock, etc.  Cook this mixture until thickened.  You may have to do some experimenting.  The proportions depend on how thick you want the sauce to be.  This sauce has the creamy taste I am looking for and miss with milks or creams.
Posted by: rustyc, Friday, January 19, 2007, 5:41pm; Reply: 22
Made a cheese sauce (goats) today and the cream worked fine.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, January 20, 2007, 1:25am; Reply: 23
Interesting and varied ideas for cream substitutions...

Thank you rustyc for testing out your recipe and letting us know how it turned out.

Alia
Posted by: rustyc, Tuesday, January 30, 2007, 5:03pm; Reply: 24
Made some more cream today - original quantities but omitting the gelatine.  The result was more like milk so reheated it slowly and added ½ the original amount of gelatine.  This gives a thick pouring consistency.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, January 30, 2007, 10:42pm; Reply: 25
Thanks for your cream experimenting update, rustyc.

Alia
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, January 30, 2007, 10:50pm; Reply: 26
adding arrow root or any compliant flour could also do the trick, I believe.
Posted by: 988 (Guest), Thursday, March 29, 2007, 8:52pm; Reply: 27
Butter vs. cream

As an O, butter is a neutral, as pure cream (here in New Zealand anyway) is the only ingredient in pure butter, why isn't pure cream allowed?  Just a query?

I am learning so much, thank you all

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, March 29, 2007, 10:11pm; Reply: 28
pollyb63,
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Posted by: Lola, Thursday, March 29, 2007, 10:17pm; Reply: 29
dairy is not a good choice for Os.

whey contained in the dairy products is an issue as well as the milk sugar -D Galactose- which is the part of the B antigen.

butter has a churning process which rids it of the whey.

ghee is a better choice in general.....
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, March 30, 2007, 6:53am; Reply: 30
Quoted from pollyb63
Butter vs. cream

As an O, butter is a neutral, as pure cream (here in New Zealand anyway) is the only ingredient in pure butter, why isn't pure cream allowed?  Just a query?

I am learning so much, thank you all



I think you raise an important Q  - cream is NOT in the type base.

In the danish pages it shows very clearly that there is very little whey in cream - due to the high fat content..
this does NOT mean that cream is a good thing for O“s...!!!
BUT maybe a lesser evil than milk.

My healthy O is allowed small ammounts of cream in weekends
Normally her enzema blushes up everytime she has milk  but with cream there is not a problem.

The way I handle the no cream problem in gravies/sauces/ creamy soups/ creams
are simple- I use ricemilk( sometimes almondmilk if it is a sweet cream)
( maybe some ricestarch if there is wine or other acid in or it seperates)
AND A big dollop of butter ( or ghee)
- That way you get some fat into this gravy/sauce and the good taste from butter that ricemilk lacks. I have cheated several people to believe that my oyster mushroom sauce was made with cream.


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