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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  B's & Eggs
Posted by: the_accidental_chef (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:25am
My husband's B. Secretor status unknown. No real source of animal protein. How many eggs are recommended for type B's? Currently I eat 6, and that gives everyone a heart attack! I know the myth about eggs& cholesterol...but when it comes to B's, how many eggs are safe for them?

tac
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:33am; Reply: 1
Hi Tac ??
Well since your husbond do not eat animal protein I would say it s safe to eat a lot of eggs !

LRT
b sec 3-4 pr week
B nonnies 5-6 pr week.
I know I am a sec- but I eat somewhere between 4- and 6 pr week-and my cholesterol is finally fine !
There are just no connecttion between eggs and cholesterol in Bs !
Posted by: the_accidental_chef (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:53am; Reply: 2
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Hi Tac ??

yes ;D, short form for the_accidental_chef

Well since your husbond do not eat animal protein I would say it s safe to eat a lot of eggs !

LRT
b sec 3-4 pr week
B nonnies 5-6 pr week.
I know I am a sec- but I eat somewhere between 4- and 6 pr week-and my cholesterol is finally fine !
There are just no connecttion between eggs and cholesterol in Bs !


Thank you! I was actually worried about B's capabilities to digest fats. Unlike O's, B's are less endowed to process fats & proteins, isnt it?

tac
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 12:13pm; Reply: 3
Bīs differ
Some Bīs are more vegetarian  and others more O like.( I am a mini O ;-D )
Fat from whole fat yoghurt and eggs does not process a problem- nor fatty fish.
But fatty meat is not great for Bīs.
Tyhe problems Bīs have with fat is mainly the polysaturated fats- notice ALL the avoids for Bīs in seeds, nuts and oils.
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 1:42pm; Reply: 4
I eat alot of eggs too, I think it is a individual thing, eggs provide alot of easily absorbable protien and quality fat
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 2:25pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from the_accidental_chef
I was actually worried about B's capabilities to digest fats. Unlike O's, B's are less endowed to process fats & proteins, isnt it?

Slightly less capability then type O, but type Bs still produce a fair amount of IAP, and stomach acid, and more then type A or AB.

Posted by: 707 (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 2:40pm; Reply: 6

I may be considered totally nuts by some, but I have 2-3 a day and feel better than ever.
Posted by: yaman, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 2:50pm; Reply: 7
My son (Type B nonnie, 23 yrs old) has three for breakfast without a problem.

When he is working out at the gym, he increases his egg intake up to four or five..

Being an O, I settle for two eggs a day

Cheers,
Yaman
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 2:51pm; Reply: 8
yeah I eat 2-4 a day too, ever had duck or turkey eggs, these are divine
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 3:08pm; Reply: 9
During spring and summermonths when my chicks ( dwarf) produces lots of eggs - I eat about 2 small 35 grams eggs pr day as well- but now when they are lazy-( as the good mum I am  ;-D ) my daughter O gets the eggs instead- I can alwys get my kefir/yoghurt etc.I am soo picky when it comes to eggs- that I only use my own eggs  for breakfast - store bought even high quality organic eggs are just NOT the same.
When I was pregnant I had 2-3 eggs pr day= got a very healthy big brainy kid ;-D
Posted by: NewHampshireGirl, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 3:58pm; Reply: 10
My cholesterol count is excellent and I eat 6-7 eggs a week.  I have noticed that eggs are being accepted again by those who are supposed to be in the "know."  No more egg bashing!  ;D  I have never believed the hype about eggs being bad for us.  I was just being my usual stubborn self, I guess.  ;) 8)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 4:01pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from New_Hampshire_Girl
 I was just being my usual stubborn self, I guess.  ;) 8)


Mee too;-D
My old granny (B) kept chicks as well- and she had plenty of eggs pr week- amybe 4-6  for breakfast  and some in food  and her health was excelent.
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 4:16pm; Reply: 12
I eat about 6-8 eggs per week too... and that does not include eggs added in casseroles and such...


But also important to remember that the size of eggs has decreased over the years... what used to be a medium sized egg is now considered a large, etc. So in recipes that call for 2 large eggs... I always add 3 if the eggs seem rather small... which is most of the time...  :-/

Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 4:23pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from the_accidental_chef
My husband's B. Secretor status unknown. No real source of animal protein. How many eggs are recommended for type B's? Currently I eat 6, and that gives everyone a heart attack! I know the myth about eggs& cholesterol...but when it comes to B's, how many eggs are safe for them?

tac


If your husband does not eat any animal protein... no wonder he is feeling fatigued!!!... as you mentioned in another thread...


I felt the worst in my life on a vegetarian diet. Probably because many of the sources of vegetable protein are avoids for B's... and that might be different if no avoids are consumed. But still I think it is difficult for some B's to maintain a good energy level on a vegetarian diet.

Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 4:54pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Kristin
I eat about 6-8 eggs per week too... and that does not include eggs added in casseroles and such...


But also important to remember that the size of eggs has decreased over the years... what used to be a medium sized egg is now considered a large, etc. So in recipes that call for 2 large eggs... I always add 3 if the eggs seem rather small... which is most of the time...  :-/




this is interesting do you know why this is?

Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 5:05pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from lkpetrolino



this is interesting do you know why this is?




No... But I can make a guess...  ;)

I assume that it is due to how eggs are sized, and that one can get a higher price for what are larger eggs. But everyone of a certain "age" will tell you that large-sized eggs used to be a lot larger 'back in the day'...

;D
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 6:46pm; Reply: 16
It's true, Kristen.  I noticed that yesterday!  I bought a dozen large eggs, and when I looked at them, I thought, "Hmmmmmmm . . . . . . . . those are some pretty tiny large eggs!)

My daughter eats more than a dozen eggs per week, sometimes 1 1/2 dozen.  She's a B non.
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 8:30pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Victoria


My daughter eats more than a dozen eggs per week, sometimes 1 1/2 dozen.  She's a B non.



That is about what I eat, nice to see she is 'eggalisious' as well
Posted by: yaman, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 8:42pm; Reply: 18
Here the free range eggs are (and have been) always smaller than farm eggs. The free hens know better ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 9:33pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from yaman
Here the free range eggs are (and have been) always smaller than farm eggs. The free hens know better ;D ;D ;D


ha, ha, funny but true, but honestly if it was you wish type of egg would you want to lay, definitly not a jumbo!

Posted by: yaman, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 9:41pm; Reply: 20
Mr rooster and Mrs hen were strolling in the marketplace. They came to an egg stand:

"Large eggs, 10 cents each!"

Mr rooster turns to Mrs hen and says:

- Look, your eggs,

Mrs hen proudly walks by, then see the next stand:

"Larger eggs, 12 cents a peace"

Feeling her misery, Mr rooster says:

- Honey don't worry 2 cents wouldn't worth to tear your arrears ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 9:49pm; Reply: 21
Yaman, you 'CRACK' me up!!!
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 9:59pm; Reply: 22
;D ;D


sure glad I'm not a hen...


;D
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:40pm; Reply: 23
How big were your babies heads, Kristen?  :-)
Posted by: Kristin, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:44pm; Reply: 24
;D ;D ;D

Oh my... don't make me remember...  :P ;) :K)


But it's often the shoulders that do ya in...  
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 10:57pm; Reply: 25
Sheesh, you had to go and mention those shoulders!!!!!  :-)
Posted by: Kristin, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 12:04am; Reply: 26
Ah... I see you've been there, too...  ;)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 12:34am; Reply: 27
http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/ask/archives/00000341.htm

good read on cholesterol and eggs.....
Posted by: the_accidental_chef (Guest), Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 2:27am; Reply: 28
Thanks everyone for your replies!

I'm in between visitors and dont have enough time to be here like I used to couple of months ago. Could y'all be kind enough to suggest meal designs suitable for B's who needs to bring his triglycerides, cholesterol & blood sugar level really down. Like in the beginning when I started on BTD, I was picking the right food but eating them at the wrong time-classic example: starchy veggies in the morning etc., Like wise, could y'all suggest what is the best way to eat for B's? I can see that my husband is worried about his health.

Please help. I'll check in later....

Thanks very, very much :K)!
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 4:58am; Reply: 29
Can you get the Cardiovascular Disease book?

He needs to eat a lot like you, although using the appropriate type B foods. He needs plenty of protein, low grain, some good clean dairy (and many B recommend full fat dairy instead of lowfat), particularly cultured dairy, lots of vegetables, some fruit, black walnuts, olive oil, green tea, turmeric, some herb teas.
Posted by: the_accidental_chef (Guest), Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 5:16am; Reply: 30
Quoted from ironwood55
Can you get the Cardiovascular Disease book?

He needs to eat a lot like you, although using the appropriate type B foods. He needs plenty of protein, low grain, some good clean dairy (and many B recommend full fat dairy instead of lowfat), particularly cultured dairy, lots of vegetables, some fruit, black walnuts, olive oil, green tea, turmeric, some herb teas.


The only 2 books available here are the ER4YT & LR4YT. There are no plans for Borders to bring the library series in. Online shopping, unfortunately isnt in my league, that's why I depend heavily on the site for info.

Mentioned to him the effects of grain-carb loading on our system, and he murmured something about staying away from grains may be for a month. He's taken a bag of green tea leaves with him to the office, and I've enough supply at home. Dairy no problems, full fat, home made stuff. Veggies & fruits, no probs as well, coz I prepare 4-5 veggie dishes.  Turmeric, no probs, part of our daily lives. Hmm, black walnuts, now there is a problem getting hold of that. Almonds in small doses, is that ok?

Soft cheese are preferred, no? Could have that as a snack for him I thought. Weekends are going to be challenging coz that's when the sweet tooth & pizza fiend arrive in full force!

Please guide me with more tips, and thanks once again!
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 5:31am; Reply: 31
The reason I mentioned black walnuts is because they are a type B Super Beneficial in the Cardiovascular Disease book. Almonds are neutral.

Use the list of acceptable cheeses in LR4YT or check TYPEbase.

Oats/oatmeal is a type B Super Beneficial in the Cardiovascular Disease book and try to use the other beneficial grains in LR4YT or check TYPEbase, but only like 1 serving a day, or less.

Maybe tomorrow I can provide more food details or maybe someone else will before I can.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 8:45am; Reply: 32
But black walnuts are impossible to get outside US !

So If you could get ordinary walnuts ( neutral) that would be good for omega 3 . Almonds is best if you donīt eat alot of them- they conatins more omega 6 - and we get far too much of that in our diet.

Here are the top 13 heart healthy food for Bs:
1) lean organic lamb or mutton
2)richly oiled fatty fish (halibut, mackerel,sardine)
3) cultured dairy( youghurt- kefir)
4) Olive oil
5) Black walnuts
6) shitake mushrooms
7) Broccoli
8 ) collards, kale, mustard greens
9) Pineapple
10) Cranberries
11) Herbal teas( dandelion, ginseng, licorice root)
12) Turmeric
13 Green tea.

Oatmeal is superbeneficial-and the only grain that is it that category- notice that riceflour product is in the (neutral-allowed infrequent category)- so be carefull with white rice and rice noodles
Bean category: fava/broad beans and nothern beans are sb while soybean is neutral infrequent and soy cheese, milk tofu is avoids!

supplemnets include:
q10
magnesium, vitamin C, fenugreek and OPC
especially for colesterol control:
soluble fibre supplement
green tea extract and Pantethine ( B5)
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 9:00am; Reply: 33
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
But black walnuts are impossible to get outside US!

common Walnut, Persian Walnut {Juglans regia - Juglandaceae}
Black Walnut, Schwarznuß, Sort Valnød  {J. nigra - Juglandaceae}

People do grow Black Walnuts in Europe - and I've even noticed that varieties of the common Walnut here in UK have a stronger flavour than normal and a select few are very similar in flavour to Black Walnuts.

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 9:29am; Reply: 34
Quoted from Schluggell

common Walnut, Persian Walnut {Juglans regia - Juglandaceae}
Black Walnut, Schwarznuß, Sort Valnød  {J. nigra - Juglandaceae}

People do grow Black Walnuts in Europe - and I've even noticed that varieties of the common Walnut here in UK have a stronger flavour than normal and a select few are very similar in flavour to Black Walnuts.



BUT not here in Denmrk- I have looked in Sweden, and Germany- and when I asked in London they looked at be : WHAT ???
I have a fine walnut tree in my garden Juglans regia - Juglandaceae it is really on the north border- but with the global heating even the swedes should be able to grow walnuts  :(  
- My whole families are involved with gardening /plants: 2 X landscapearchitects, 1X gardener, 1 X a forest guy) and they all say that black walnut do not grow well here.( and taste too bitter)
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 1:45pm; Reply: 35
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
... they all say that black walnut do not grow well here.( and taste too bitter)

I agree. I don't care for the taste of black walnuts, at least by themselves.  :P
The taste is probably OK when used sparingly in certain foods.

Posted by: typebdiet, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 2:24pm; Reply: 36
Just a question about an earlier comment (I don't know how to transfer the quote).

How does one determine if they are a B who is more O-like or more vegetarian-like?
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 2:31pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from typebdiet
Just a question about an earlier comment (I don't know how to transfer the quote).

Click on the quote button above the post you want to quote. It will put that post in the start of new message. Or just cut and paste and type in the quote blah code or use the quote blah code button.
Quoted from typebdiet
How does one determine if they are a B who is more O-like or more vegetarian-like?

I don't understand your question.

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 3:04pm; Reply: 38
Well It was my comment
I think that because Bīs are BT with the most variety- all foodgroups are part of it I think the approach to the B diet can be very varied:
I know a B who do very well with a almost vegetarian( Lacto-ovo) approach: She eats only 1-2 servings of meat- and maybe 1-2 serving of fish pr week an the ammount is tiny- BUT the high number of grain and beans- she she is very fit and well:
I need the high ammount of meat and fish( and a medium- large serving) - and never get close the beans - and IF I had the max of grains I would be more fat. I am closer to the Oīs- I get really cranky without animal protein.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 3:50pm; Reply: 39
Bs as well as Os do best with their recommended servings of meat.

due to their higher levels of IAP ( as opposed to As) their physiology is designed to not avoid meat.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 4:12pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from lola
Bs as well as Os do best with their recommended servings of meat.


But notice the difference from :

2 servings pr week: my friend- Bsec rh+
to 8 pr week= B nonnie rh-
lots of variety
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