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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Liver--Does It Have to Smell?
Posted by: MyraBee, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 12:19am
Well.  I have a liver story to tell!    (book2)

I decided I was going to try and eat calf liver about once a month.  I think it is only a neutral, but very inexpensive, so I thought I would try it, if for no other reason than to stretch my grocery budget.

Anyway.  I was going to fix it for dinner last night, and when I opened the package, I literally had to choke back bile in the back of my throat! (somewhat of a pun not intended)  It smelled!!!!   :P

So. In a moment of desperation I dumped the offending liver into a freezer bag and poured about a third of a bottle of cheap lambrusco in after it.  I then all-but-tossed- it into the frig.

Guess what?  This morning when I opened the refrig--the liver was still there.   :P

Oh no.   >:(

Well. I stewed about for most of the day. (somewhat of a pun not intended)    ??)

And...decided to talk a walk on the wild side.   8)

I dumped out the wine, dredged the liver in spelt/compliant seasonings and browned it in ghee.  No Smell!!!!!!!  Except the good kind!    :o

Then....I placed the very tender browned liver in a pyrex pan and covered it with onions quickly cooked in the leftovers in the frying pan.

I popped it in the oven, and am now sitting at my desk, waiting for it to cook a bit longer.  I am also sitting in wonderment that it took me until I was 48 years old to cook liver.    ??)

My DS said he'd bet his Spring Break Savings Account that the devil was doing triple jumps on his newly formed ice rink!     ;D

Thanks for sharing this experience with me--I'm just sorry all my liver neutral kin can't be here to share the final results with me!      :'(

Much love,   :K)

My.

Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 12:33am; Reply: 1
enjoy!!

next time you can marinate it in lemon juice and spices of your choice during the night in the fridge........next day, cut up into very thin slices, pat dry and brown with lots of onions.
Posted by: Debra+, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 2:42am; Reply: 2
MyraBee--- ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Too funny....yep it can be a bit of an acquired taste.  Hey...until BTD I didn't enjoy it at all.  I used to eat it more when I thought I was a secretor.  Had it yesterday in fact...with tons of onions, garlic and curry powder.  Spinach salad on the side so I really got my double dose of iron. ;)

Hope you enjoyed it.

Debra :)

P.S.  Hmmmmm Lola...that sounds good...will try it next time.
Posted by: Rodney, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 4:29am; Reply: 3
Well so what do you think of your calf liver MyraBee?
I remember my grandma used to soak the liver in milk overnight then of course smothered in onions and bacon.
I like the sounds of the red wine better. now what could we use instead of bacon???
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 5:22am; Reply: 4
turkey bacon...
Posted by: OSuzanna, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 7:01am; Reply: 5
In keeping with being an odd kid, I always adored things like liver, spinach, broccoli, etc - even lima beans! Shopping for food as an adult, I've noticed beef liver smells yucky to me, but calves' liver smells sweeter. I cook it in a frying pan with hardly any seasonings but maybe lots of onions browned first, and have it still a little pink in the middle. Also love, love love chicken livers & treat them the same way. The more people think they're disgusting, the more for me! ;D
Oooh, Lola! Turkey bacon! Must try it.
Posted by: Schluggell, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 8:40am; Reply: 6
If you ever get the chance to butcher your own animal - Liver doesn't smell or taste when its fresh...there is even Liver Sashimi and it isn't half bad except for the mental image it provides.
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 11:39am; Reply: 7
but calf liver ist only for some minutes expected to roast....if not it gets very quick hard and dry ...ykes :P...try it once with loads of oignons, yess and then add appleslices....fresh appleslices ....soooo yummi
and then add only some dried ginger, no wine at all !!
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 3:20pm; Reply: 8
"I like the sounds of the red wine better. now what could we use instead of bacon???"

Is turkey bacon an option?

Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 3:24pm; Reply: 9
"In keeping with being an odd kid, I always adored things like liver, spinach, broccoli, etc - even lima beans! Shopping for food as an adult, I've noticed beef liver smells yucky to me, but calves' liver smells sweeter. I cook it in a frying pan with hardly any seasonings but maybe lots of onions browned first, and have it still a little pink in the middle. Also love, love love chicken livers & treat them the same way. The more people think they're disgusting, the more for me!"

I've never cooked it before, but I've always loved it, too, as well as the other foods you mentioned.  I just found a local organic supplier & placed an order for some yesterday that I can pick up this weekend.  I'll try these ideas next week!  The thought of it makes my dh cringe, but not me.  Since he won't eat it, it's been years since I've had it, and never organic.  I'm excited!

Also, I've never tried heart or sweetbreads, but ordered some of those, too.  Anybody eat those?  Should they just be cooked the same way as the liver?
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 3:26pm; Reply: 10
enjoy!! )
Posted by: MyraBee, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 5:22pm; Reply: 11
Wow!

I had a Great Dinner Last Night!!!!  And it's the truth, the whole truth!

Believe it or not, I had three servings of the liver!  And, if any of you in Texas felt any seismic occurances, not to wory!  It was just my mother--turning over in her grave!   ;D ;D ;D ;D

The wine seemed to totally neutralize the liver taste, and definitely the smell!

This experience is proof-positive that I'm still a newbie!  I woke up this morning feeling like Santa Claus had just been here!

Isn't this a great, and fun, journey?!!

Love--  

My.   :K)

Posted by: MyraBee, Tuesday, January 9, 2007, 5:25pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from ISA-MANUELA
but calf liver ist only for some minutes expected to roast....if not it gets very quick hard and dry ...ykes :P...try it once with loads of oignons, yess and then add appleslices....fresh appleslices ....soooo yummi
and then add only some dried ginger, no wine at all !!



I forgot to mention that I roasted it in 2 cups of plain, homemade, beef broth/stock.  I let it roast, covered, for about an hour and a half, or two, and when I pulled it out of the oven, most of the broth had been absorbed--leaving tender-ly fabulous liver.

Thanks Isa!

Love,

My.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 2:45am; Reply: 13
excellent!

I ve made compliant liver pate that way!
Posted by: Dr. D, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 1:39pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Schluggell
If you ever get the chance to butcher your own animal - Liver doesn't smell or taste when its fresh...there is even Liver Sashimi and it isn't half bad except for the mental image it provides.


Plus you can use it to predict the future:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haruspice
Posted by: ruthie, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 2:39pm; Reply: 15
Ah yes liver...brings back memories...hog killing time was an all day and nite affair when I was a kid.  We always had liver for supper that night because it was so easy to spoil.  I grew up not knowing that the rest of the world did not like liver since you ate what was put on the table.  The women practically stayed up all nite grinding meat with a hand grinder, making sausage patties, cooking them and canning them in their own grease.  The next morn you had brains and eggs for breakfast.  Then began the rendering of the fat into lard and the smoking of the hams in the smokehouse.  The whole hog was eaten in some way.
I never realized that we were poor because there was plenty to eat.  Maybe it wasn't fancy food, but it was filling.
I still like liver today, but being an A...I only indulge about twice a year.  The memory of fresh hog liver dredged in flour and fried in bacon grease still makes my mouth water.
namaste
ruthie
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 3:15pm; Reply: 16
Ruthie that sounds like my childhood- and I am from 1972 :-D
People here still eat a lot of liverpaste/pate:
liver, fat or flour/mil gravy- onions spices.
grey thing to spread on the bread- I don´t like it - but my kid does:
I only buy the one made with organic veal liver and no gluten or dairy.
In the past the danes sold all the bacon and meat to UK and germany and kept the liver- and lived of liverpate !

However I did have bbq veal liver at a libanese friend:
Marinated in lemonjuice, garlic, chili and oregano- bbqéd rosamedium- I though it was beef :-D - and was surprised to find out that it was my dreaded liver.
Posted by: rustyc, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 7:30pm; Reply: 17
Where do you live that calves liver is cheap?  It's the most expensive here in the UK.  We make do with lambs liver!  Fanny Craddock (TV cook of the 60's) used to marinate ox liver in milk and said it tasted like calves liver.  Haven't actually tried it though.
Posted by: MyraBee, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 7:53pm; Reply: 18
Hi, Rusty!

I live in Kansas which is located squarely in the center of the US.  

After the Civil War ended in 1865, all the renegades who moved to Texas after the war stole cattle from Mexico and drove it north to Kansas to hit the big livestock markets.  

Most of the Old West Cattle/Gunfighter movies were placed somewhere between Dodge City and Abiliene; Wichita is about the midway point between the two.  All three of the towns have Old West Tourist attractions, and get a lot of visitors each year who are interested in reliving those "glory days of yesteryear"!

We still have a lot of cattle here.  The liver I purchased was right at $2.00 US for a pound.

Hope this wasn't too much information!   ;)

Myra.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, January 10, 2007, 9:15pm; Reply: 19
Denmark: price for organic veal liver varies: but organic veal liver cost around 4 dollars pr pound
- remember that food and income in Denmark is different than US- and our tax on food is 25 % .
it is still rather cheap protein!
- IF you buy conventional - which i would NEVER do - due to toxics ending up in liver- it is even cheaper.
Posted by: OSuzanna, Monday, January 15, 2007, 9:11am; Reply: 20
Dr. D, thanks for the laugh, Henriette, thanks for the bbq liver ingredients! OMG, this thread is making my mouth water! LOL
Hmm, insomnia plus liver in the fridge equals a 4a.m. trip to the kitchen for a liver treat. Liver treat. Sounds like a pet snack commercial. ;D
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Tuesday, January 16, 2007, 6:54pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from MyraBee
I dumped out the wine, dredged the liver in spelt/compliant seasonings and browned it in ghee.  No Smell!!!!!!!  Except the good kind!    :o

Then....I placed the very tender browned liver in a pyrex pan and covered it with onions quickly cooked in the leftovers in the frying pan.



I just made this (except used almond milk instead of wine b/c that's all I have on hand) and it is sooooooooooooooooo good!  I haven't had liver in years, and I may eat the whole pound that I cooked!  I used one large onion - next time I may use two.  Dh hates it, so it's all mine ;D.

I have a feeling I'll be on a liver kick for a while.  Yum yum yum.
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 1:54pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from admin
Plus you can use it to predict the future:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haruspice

I'd heard of 'Hepatomancy' before - At first I thought 'Haruspice' was some sort of new BTD-compliant seasoning blend to try...


Quoted from Stephanie_Jackson
Also, I've never tried heart or sweetbreads, but ordered some of those, too...

Heart is good - Boil the 'whizz' out of the rest first....


For a seasoning instead of bacon - Try Powdered Shiitake.
If its literally bacon you're after thinly sliced Fried Tempeh with a splash of Tamari and/or the above Powdered Shiitake works- my way of doing a 'BLTe'.
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 4:22pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Schluggell
Heart is good - Boil the 'whizz' out of the rest first....



That sounds scary - what do you mean?  Are they gross?  Mine are still wrapped & frozen, so I haven't even seen them yet.  How do you cook them?

Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 4:35pm; Reply: 24
sweetbreads you can also roast in the oven.....till brown and crispy.

the heart is what should be boiled first.........I believe that s what Schlug meant.

google recipes for both, and see what you come up with, then tweak according to your type, for compliance.
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 4:49pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from lola
sweetbreads you can also roast in the oven.....till brown and crispy.

the heart is what should be boiled first.........I believe that s what Schlug meant.

google recipes for both, and see what you come up with, then tweak according to your type, for compliance.


I'm looking at recipes for heart now & none of them say to boil, but should I do that first, anyway?  One recipe in particular is a mushroom-stuffed heart that is trimmed & cooked in the crock pot: http://www.cooksrecipes.com/beef/stuffed-beef-heart-with-mushroom-stuffing-recipe.html.  I just want to make sure I do it right so I don't get grossed out on it & never want to try it again.  Does anyone here cook these beef cuts & if so, do you like them, or just tolerate them?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 4:54pm; Reply: 26
follow the recipe which best suits your taste........that s what I would suggest.
here s a recipe given by one of our members, Sabrina, I believe; who by the way doesn t post anymore......wonder where she s at?
Quoted Text
Beef Heart with Wild Rice and Mushrooms

                           2 cups uncooked wild rice
                           1 pound sliced mushrooms
                           1 cup pine nuts
                           1 Teaspoon dill weed
                           1/2 garlic sliced
                           1/2 garlic crushed
                           16 ounces beef stock ( or beef broth)

Place the wild rice in the beef stock, (or broth), add water to required
liquid amount for the rice you are using in a saucepan, and prepare as usual.
 Place mushrooms in skillet with just enough butter if you can eat it, ghee
if you can't to brown the mushrooms, add pine nuts and saute till mushrooms
are brown.
Place the beef heart in a pot of water and boil for 30 min..
As the mushrooms are cooking, add the garlic, both crushed, and sliced, and
the dill weed
Take any liquid broth/water mix that is left from rice preparation and place
on heat adding just enough rice flour to thicken to desired consistency.
Fold the heart, rice, and mushrooms and nuts together  and pour " gravy" over
and serve.
Posted by: MyraBee, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 7:41pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from Stephanie_Jackson



I just made this (except used almond milk instead of wine b/c that's all I have on hand) and it is sooooooooooooooooo good!  I haven't had liver in years, and I may eat the whole pound that I cooked!  I used one large onion - next time I may use two.  Dh hates it, so it's all mine ;D.

I have a feeling I'll be on a liver kick for a while.  Yum yum yum.



I know what you mean about eating the whole pound--mine tasted absolutely amazing, too.

Too bad for the DH--Lucky for you, Stephanie!  :D
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 9:16pm; Reply: 28
When I was younger, Mom would boil the beef heart (with some spices), then slice and simmer in a creamy tomato sauce.  She usually served it with mashed potatoes and a salad or hot vegetable.

Alas, this like so many other wonderful dishes have been put aside in favor of better health due to avoid status.
Posted by: MyraBee, Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 9:48pm; Reply: 29
ABJoe--

Are you able to describe the taste of Beef Heart?  Also, the texture?  

Since I keep patting myself on the back for my very successful liver adventure,  ;D  I am thinking about branching out a bit more into the culinary world.

Myra.
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Wednesday, January 17, 2007, 11:45pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from lola

here s a recipe given by one of our members, Sabrina, I believe; who by the way doesn t post anymore......wonder where she s at?


That looks delicious (and easy)!  Thanks Lola (and, of course, Sabrina).

Posted by: MyraBee, Thursday, January 18, 2007, 12:02am; Reply: 31
Since pine nuts are neutrals, it might be good to substitute with a HB or B nut in Sabrina's (via Lola) recipe for beef heart.  Also, beef heart is a neutral for B nonnies, but pine nuts are an avoid for B's.

The recipe sure sounds yummy--If I can find out what Beef Heart tastes, and feels, like.

:)
Posted by: kimghob (Guest), Sunday, January 21, 2007, 1:53am; Reply: 32
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but when dealing with Liver or any other organ type of meat, you need to wash it out under running water until the water turns white, as you are taking out all the putrid stuff the liver takes in, remember it is a filter, so it does acumulate all the bad stuff.
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, January 21, 2007, 2:35am; Reply: 33
kimghob,
welcome!)
get acquainted with the forum and all features
of this website.
If you go to the top of the page and click on
member centre (on the top right hand side of
this page) and get yourself a nice avatar
(located on the left) then we can all see what
blood type you are and you won't have to type it each time you post.
-if you want to add information below your avatar setting, such as Rh +/-, by going to the Profile Information section in the Member Center and typing in the Personal Message box.  You can also create a Signature of any other information you want to share that will go at the bottom of every message you post.
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Posted by: Lola, Sunday, January 21, 2007, 2:37am; Reply: 34
also marinating overnight helps a lot......throw away the marinating juices, before cooking.
Posted by: 1058 (Guest), Sunday, January 21, 2007, 3:32pm; Reply: 35
Quoted from kimghob
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but when dealing with Liver or any other organ type of meat, you need to wash it out under running water until the water turns white, as you are taking out all the putrid stuff the liver takes in, remember it is a filter, so it does acumulate all the bad stuff.


Good to know.
Posted by: Gee Whiz, Sunday, January 21, 2007, 5:11pm; Reply: 36
Interesting thread.  My mom would cook liver and all of us kids hated it, even though we are all meat-loving Os.  We gagged down our "three bites", (the rule in our house was that you had to take at least 3 bites of everything) but we still all hate liver.  It's nice to know it can be made palatable, even if I never try it again (though I do like a good pate...).

Recently I heard someone say "Liver?  Isn't that the organ that filters out all the junk?  Hey, I love my Brita filter, but I'm not about to tear it open and eat it next time I change it!"  I had to laugh at that!
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, January 21, 2007, 9:24pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from MyraBee

Are you able to describe the taste of Beef Heart?  Also, the texture?


The taste of beef heart is very similar to the taste of chicken or turkey heart...  The flavor will change some depending on how it is spiced.

The beef heart texture is somewhat firm, but less so than either chicken or turkey hearts; or maybe it is that the beef heart was always cooked so much more than the other hearts...?.

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