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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Best Way to Prepare Meat?
Posted by: 107 (Guest), Monday, January 1, 2007, 2:00am
What's the most nutritious and best way to fix meat like bison, beef or other red meats?  What about chicken or turkey?  Mostly I buy the ground kind?

Is a George Foreman healthy?

Posted by: KimonoKat, Monday, January 1, 2007, 2:20am; Reply: 1
Dr. D recommends marinading beef in cherry juice before cooking.  I don't know if that goes for lamb too or not.

Preperation depends on your taste.  We cook in a lot of olive oil and ghee, and I add a bit of ghee to my beef when I eat it.  We rarely cook chicken anymore (if we do it's to make a thick soup), and turkey once a year.  If I choose a neutral protein for me it's shrimp because I just love it.

Posted by: Lloyd, Monday, January 1, 2007, 5:55am; Reply: 2
Quoted from KimonoKat
Dr. D recommends marinading beef in cherry juice before cooking.  I don't know if that goes for lamb too or not.


Ground and frozen meats benefit from cherry juice or any other polyamine reducing marinade. Optional would be eating a polyamine lowering food as part of the meal, like walnuts.
Posted by: koahiatamadl, Monday, January 1, 2007, 10:52am; Reply: 3
Hope you buy your ground meat from a good source.  It is difficult to tell what ground meat is made up of and it may contain a lot of fat and is generally made of low quality cuts of meat - I only ever buy mine from a trusted source and always drain any fat off after browning the meat.  Alternatively you could just mince meat yourself.
Posted by: Laura P, Monday, January 1, 2007, 11:43am; Reply: 4
I will generally buy a steak of some sort and grind in myself, much safer that way
Posted by: mikeo, Monday, January 1, 2007, 3:24pm; Reply: 5
lamb chops marinated in some fresh rosemary and wheat free tamari sauce is really good  broiled in the oven
Posted by: Laura P, Monday, January 1, 2007, 3:27pm; Reply: 6
agreed,  I also like to do lamb or fish 'eskimo style' boil some water, cut into chunks and drop in water for 45-90 sec

If you can get good quality steak tartare is fabulous with either ground beef, bison or lamb
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 1, 2007, 3:47pm; Reply: 7
I set a lamb leg in my crock pot this morning before connecting.....
off I go to add some rosemary!!!
did put quite a bit of garlic, though.
Thanks for the reminder Mike!!!
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, January 1, 2007, 3:54pm; Reply: 8
I've used a George Foreman grill and yes, I think it's healthy. The fat drains off and leaves you with a nice juicy hamburger or steak. Very handy, quick cleanup, and your stovetop is free to use for other things, like steaming broccoli or sauteeing kale, etc.

For lean cuts, your best bet is either searing the meat quickly in a skillet or broiler and eating it fairly rare (which is better for you anyway), or in the case of pot roasts or brisket etc, braising--that is, cooking in an enclosed container for long periods in gentle heat. Throw in some root vegetables like parsnips, turnips, carrots etc with garlic and fresh thyme, maybe a good hearty red wine, and you've got a great dinner in your pot or slow cooker!

I've never tried marinating ground meat in cherry juice. Do you use sour cherry or black? I have added blueberries to hamburger and it's pretty good, actually (but then I'm a total blueberry fanatic, so maybe my opinion is biased *chuckle*).
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 1, 2007, 5:55pm; Reply: 9
prune puree also helps lowe polyamines....
Posted by: koahiatamadl, Monday, January 1, 2007, 7:29pm; Reply: 10
I've made meat balls with minced beef, chopped onion, prune and garlic - they were scrumptious!
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 1, 2007, 8:19pm; Reply: 11
good to know!
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Tuesday, January 2, 2007, 7:25pm; Reply: 12
Except for something big like a turkey or roast, I often boil the meat before cooking it other ways, as I heard that it decarcinogizes it. If the meat is pure, I may save the 'juice' & use it in gravy.
I still don't trust any grilling.  I see it as cancer waiting to happen.  I also don't like the taste & it even makes my skin look bad for a few days! AH, vanity!!!!
S S & L,
Mrs "T"     O+
Posted by: 107 (Guest), Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:02am; Reply: 13
You even boil ground meat?  How?
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, January 4, 2007, 4:37am; Reply: 14
Dr D mentioned boiling the meat for a minute would take care of the polyamine buildup.....
much like marinading in cherry juice or other polyamine lowering fruits.
Posted by: Schluggell, Thursday, January 4, 2007, 9:02am; Reply: 15
Quoted from mikeo
lamb chops marinated in some fresh rosemary and wheat free tamari sauce is really good  broiled in the oven


I agree with the flavour.
As this thread is concerned though I'd guess this would be higher in Polyamines...

PersonallyI like my meat plain if its freshly slaughtered/butchered.
Not to say this happens a lot for me though.

I've had many meats 'Tartare' - never considered Lamb...Oooh something new to try, I suppose this works with Goat as welll.
Posted by: 107 (Guest), Saturday, January 6, 2007, 1:55am; Reply: 16
Could just eating fresh or frozen cherries or blueberries with the meat block the polyamines in the meat or does it need to be marinated in it?

Posted by: Lola, Saturday, January 6, 2007, 2:01am; Reply: 17
I believe that will also work nicely.
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Saturday, January 6, 2007, 10:21pm; Reply: 18
I would think marinating would be better, as it takes a lot of time, which I think would be needed to accomplish the decarcinogizing of the meat.
Also, we shouldn't eat fruits with meats.  That is an important food combination rule.
S S & L,
 Mrs "T"      O+
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, January 7, 2007, 5:22am; Reply: 19
berries are easy to digest , in my opinion.

protein is served with different fruit purees for centuries......it is all a matter of tolerance and taste, too.
for example, cramberries or apple sauces with turkey or wild game meats, etc........endless combinations.

and don t forget what Lloyd mentioned, about eating walnuts to lower polyamines, too.

I would abstain from eating starchy fruit together with protein though.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Monday, January 8, 2007, 1:38am; Reply: 20
Hey, now, what is this about meat being terribly carcinogenic????? I kinda really wanna know....I am told to eat a lot of it and Eskimo style cooking isn't going to cut it here......are we really supposed to marinate all our meat in cherry juice??????And is grilling really that bad? (boiling a steak?) OK I'm freaking out, cuz I eat a lot of meat, after being a vegetarian for so long.....
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, January 8, 2007, 1:42am; Reply: 21
"Meat" is not carcinogenic.  It is meat that has been char-grilled, burned, frozen (I think), and otherwise been "damaged".
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Monday, January 8, 2007, 1:52am; Reply: 22
Ohhhhh, thank you, Victoria....
anyone......
Is a gas grill better  (healthwise ) than a charcoal one, do you suppose? since the fat does not fall on coals .....(that's the bad part) and also, if you place a  pan under the meat to catch the drippings the bad thing won't happen..........
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, January 8, 2007, 1:55am; Reply: 23
Good question.  I look forward to knowledgable answers.  I've never owned any kind of grill, so I'm a newbie, in this field!  :-)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 8, 2007, 2:13am; Reply: 24
as long as the meat isn t charred it is fine......charred meat is carcinogenic.
Posted by: MyraBee, Monday, January 8, 2007, 3:40am; Reply: 25
I've been cooking my GB in 1/4 cup or so of Red Wine.  Would that work like cherry juice?

My.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, January 8, 2007, 5:02am; Reply: 26
cherry juice is more potent, I believe.

red wine has some benefits, too, but nothing compared to cherry or blueberry juice.
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