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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Pork: just plain nasty?
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 7:52pm
I know that pork is a no-no for anyone.  But I was wondering about organic, grass-fed pork.  Is that still considered nasty and an Avoid for all?
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:08pm; Reply: 1
Pigs are omnivores, not grass eaters (ruminants). So what you would look for would be pastured or pasture raised, not grass-fed, pork.
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:22pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from ironwood55
Pigs are omnivores, not grass eaters (ruminants). So what you would look for would be pastured or pasture raised, not grass-fed, pork.


Sure, but my question is - would such pig meat be considered acceptable for any blood groups according to the BTD?

Posted by: mhameline, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:25pm; Reply: 3
No, I think pork is an avoid for everyone no matter if it's organic or not.  
Just like for people who are O's wheat is an avoid no matter if it's organic wheat or not.  An avoid is an avoid no matter how you get it I guess.  
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:26pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from AfricanTypeO
I know that pork is a no-no for anyone.  But I was wondering about organic, grass-fed pork.  Is that still considered nasty and an Avoid for all?

Yes.  Pork contains a "panhemaglutinin" (it agglutinates all blood types) and thus is an avoid for all.  Check this puppy out:

http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/ask/archives/00000174.htm
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:28pm; Reply: 5
Thanks Mhameline and Peppermint.   I just did a Google on pigs and learned that they eat their own feces, have been known to attack and eat humans and are generally pretty nasty. No pigmeat for me!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:35pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from AfricanTypeO
Thanks Mhameline and Peppermint.   I just did a Google on pigs and learned that they eat their own feces, have been known to attack and eat humans and are generally pretty nasty. No pigmeat for me!

Pfffft, pigs are cool animals.  However, they are best admired for their peachy qualities and not eaten, due to the aforementioned panhemaglutinin sitch.
:)

Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:35pm; Reply: 7

Delhi boy eaten by herd of pigs
A three-year-old boy has been eaten alive by a neighbour's herd of pigs on the outskirts of the Indian capital, Delhi, police say.

The boy, Ajay, strayed from the family home as his parents and other family members were having lunch.

When his mother went to look for him, she found the pigs chewing something and spotted bits of her son's clothing.

She threw stones at the animals but they turned on her. Her screams alerted neighbours who came to her rescue.

'Playing'

Relatives in the village of Samaipur Badli in north-west Delhi told police the boy had been carrying bread, which might have led the animals to attack him.

A senior police official, Manish Aggarwal, said a local man who owned the pigs had been detained for causing death due to negligence.

"Three children were playing outside their house when the incident took place," Mr Aggarwal told the BBC.

"The victim, Ajay, strayed from the area but his parents or relatives were not there to save him since they were having lunch inside their house."
Posted by: MyraBee, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:41pm; Reply: 8
You know, my daddy used to say that "Ham's my favorite fruit"....and look what happened to him!   ;)

RIP Daddy Dear--

Your loving Princess.   :K)
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 8:41pm; Reply: 9
That story reminds me of one of the Hannibal Lecter stories (I read the book) in which pigs were used as weapons to kill humans. Yikes. I personally like pigs, but it's good to keep in mind while they can be domesticated and kept as pets (apparently they are smarter than dogs), packs of anything are more ferocious than individuals.
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 9:04pm; Reply: 10
Have any of you seen the movie, Snatch?  There is a gangster in that film who feeds his human victims to his pigs.  He describes the pigs as chowing through human bone like it was butter!
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 9:11pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from AfricanTypeO
Have any of you seen the movie, Snatch?  There is a gangster in that film who feeds his human victims to his pigs.  He describes the pigs as chowing through human bone like it was butter!


I wonder what the 'yuck' response is when we think about eating an animal that will eat itself or another animal (humans are animals)? Fish eat other fish and we eat them. Interesting thoughts I'm having. Must be lunch time.
Posted by: EquiPro, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 9:26pm; Reply: 12
I don't particularly care for any of the porcine family, although I truly love to eat pork, I keep it to a very occassionally occassion.

One thing that is extremely interesting:

Of ALL of the domestic animals across the board, the domestic pig is the one that will revert back to it's wild state the quickest of all.  I had known this from school, but National Geographic channel did a really interesting show on "Hogzilla" an enormous feral hog shot and buried in GA.

Nice, calm, domestic pigs will physically and mentally revert to wild pigs (feral) within months of getting lose.  They begin a physical transformation almost immediately where their hair type changes, the begin to grow tusks and their facial features change.

Weird!
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 9:31pm; Reply: 13
I d have wild boar anytime!!
roasted like in the times of king Arthur,with all his knights around the round table!!!!  yummmm!! LOL

here s a quote by Dr D:
Quoted Text
Pork is probably inherrently OK for most type
O's, but it has got to be one of
the most antibiotic and nitrate laden meats
there is, and I like to see even
meat eaters make better choices. Wild boar
(if you could get it!) would be OK.
Posted by: MyraBee, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 10:17pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from EquiPro
Nice, calm, domestic pigs will physically and mentally revert to wild pigs (feral) within months of getting lose.  They begin a physical transformation almost immediately where their hair type changes, the begin to grow tusks and their facial features change. Weird!


This is Totally True!  

I used to live in a little place called Antlers, OK.  I heard it on pretty good authority that the boys who worked at the Sale Barn would occasionally let a piglet or two out (in the surrounding woods) during the Spring and go hunting for Wild Hogs in the  the Fall--And They Were Wild!!!!

Oh, the Antlers stories I could tell----   ;D

Love,

Myra.

Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 10:19pm; Reply: 15
They have wild boar at my local grocery stores and also here: http://www.brokenarrowranch.com/?gclid=CKnfhc_6jYkCFRE9FQodiyBOCQ

I've always been afraid that pigs contain some rather grim bacteria and/or parasites
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 10:31pm; Reply: 16
I can't think of pigs without remembering what I saw as a child on the farms where people kept pigs.  They have got to be one of the most filthy animals I have ever seen, and I get the idea that they will absolutely eat anything, from the most gross, filthy stuff, to any life form that they can get in their mouths.  I heard of many babies and little children that were eaten by the family pigs.  They grew to enormous size, and regularly ate their own piglets that were not fast enough to get out of the way when "Mama Hog" rolled over.  
In the wild, perhaps they will simply be cleaner because they have a larger space to run around in.  But their waste products have WAY the worst organic smell I have ever been around!

That said . . . I used to really love the taste of bacon and pork chops!  :-)
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, December 12, 2006, 11:13pm; Reply: 17
Investigation into the effects of pork consumption on blood chemistry has revealed serious changes for several hours after pork is consumed.  The pork used was organic, fre of trichinosis, so the changes that occured in the blood were due to some other factor, possibly a protein unique to pork (most likely the one that contains the lectin that makes it an avoid for all blood types).  In a lab, pork is one of the best mediums for feeding the growth of cancer cells.  

I am a big believer in the intuitive eating practices of ancient cultures and look at all of the cultures that have prohibitions against pork.  It can be found in the Bible and the Koran.
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 12:05am; Reply: 18
Quoted from lkpetrolino
the best mediums for feeding the growth of cancer cells.  
.


OMG.  You mean pork actually makes cancer cells grow?  That's awful.

Posted by: Brighid45, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 12:32am; Reply: 19
I still like the very occasional slice of bacon, but I've gone off pork completely otherwise. Never was a pork eater--to me the meat is greasy and has an aftertaste that is often unpleasant. And yes, I've seen pigs on the farm and dealt with their manure . . . if that isn't enough to put you off pork roast forever, nothing is. :P
Posted by: Laura P, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 12:42am; Reply: 20
Interestingly enough most of the research done has shown the cancer connection in the meat and not the fat.  Plus most traditional cultures used pig fat (lard) and prized it but didn't eat the meat.  

I love bacon too, but it doesn't love me, makes me sick for weeks.
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 12:47am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Brighid45
I still like the very occasional slice of bacon, but I've gone off pork completely otherwise. Never was a pork eater--to me the meat is greasy and has an aftertaste that is often unpleasant. And yes, I've seen pigs on the farm and dealt with their manure . . . if that isn't enough to put you off pork roast forever, nothing is. :P


What sort of bacon do you have the occasional slice of?  Is it pigmeat bacon?  or perhaps beef or turkey?

Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 2:28am; Reply: 22
Quoted from Brighid45
I still like the very occasional slice of bacon...


Have you tried Wellshire Turkey Bacon? Or Applegate Farms Turkey Bacon? Both are very close to the pork bacon taste (although it's been YEARS since I've eaten pork bacon, so what do I know really).
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 2:44am; Reply: 23
I never did like pork bacon.  I live in apartment building and my neighbors seem to fry bacon every morning because I can smell it when I go downstairs and it makes me gag.  I hate hate hate pork and bacon and ham.  I guess I'm really lucky that I happen to hate it, since it is an Avoid.
Posted by: Laura P, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 2:53am; Reply: 24
mmmmmmmmmmm...................I love the smell of bacon
Posted by: marianne, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 3:23am; Reply: 25
The smell of bacon frying sends me out of the house wheezing with asthma becauseof the nitrates being released by heating!
Posted by: 1495 (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 6:58am; Reply: 26
Quoted from marianne
The smell of bacon frying sends me out of the house wheezing with asthma becauseof the nitrates being released by heating!


But isn't some of that hideous pink stuff nitrate free nowadays?

Posted by: 1501 (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 8:51am; Reply: 27
Quoted Text
I just did a Google on pigs and learned that they eat their own feces,



FWIW, so do chickens.
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 9:11am; Reply: 28
very bääää :P :P :P if somebody cooks whatsoever out of pork...yech ...have nearly to vomate ::) :B :X
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 2:52pm; Reply: 29
Well pork is just a tier 2 avoid for B secs- so at special times of year: like Christmas
I do eat organic or high quality bacon, ham or sausages without nitrates etc
. I don´t know if it is my heritage -Danes eat a lot of pork- but pork does really not bother me much.... but normally I tend to avoid it.
Posted by: EquiPro, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 3:54pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from semmens



FWIW, so do chickens.


Lots of animals do.  It is very common and is called "coprophagy".  This is normal and natural and actually quite healthy.  Most animals synthesize all of the vitamins that they need.  Guinea Pigs and humans are examples of the very rare issue of not doing so, in that we don't make Vitamin C.

However, a lot of this synthesis takes place in the lower end of the large colon and therefore these nutrients are excreted, rather than absorbed.

The animal is simply consuming the nutrients that it needs and that were produced and excreted by the body.  This is extremely common, and if you carefully watch animals for long periods of time, you will notice that almost all do it at one time or another.  They will consume their own feces, the feces of their own species and that of other species in order to get these nutrients.

This is why dogs relish cat poo, which we have discussed before!

Posted by: mikeo, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 6:39pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from outdoordrea


I wonder what the 'yuck' response is when we think about eating an animal that will eat itself or another animal (humans are animals)? Fish eat other fish and we eat them. Interesting thoughts I'm having. Must be lunch time.


you are what you eat eats
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 6:47pm; Reply: 32
I had this housemate named Muff (real name:  Elizabeth, now, I ask you, which would you choose, plus she was a Dead Head...a Dead Head named Muff, unusual *lol*...and she was also a tennis pro/preppy type, so she was definitely a oner!) when I lived in a farmhouse in Vermont for a time as a college student.  Muff was a fantastic cook.

She would often make coffee and bacon in the morning, neither of which I would partake of, yet the smell was WONDERFUL.  I think both coffee and bacon are things that produce an aroma far more wondrous than their actual taste.

Something about waking up on a frozen Vermont morning to a few new feet of snow outside and the aroma of coffee and bacon downstairs that was truly priceless.

Route 15, halfway between Johnson and Jeffersonville, VT...Muff also grew all sorts of winter veggies and would make things like spanakopita using our own spinach, etc.  Ummm MMMM!
Posted by: Brighid45, Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 11:37pm; Reply: 33
ATO--I usually have turkey bacon. We don't keep any pork in the house at all, and when we eat out I try to avoid dishes with pork or other avoids. But even the turkey or beef bacon are not all that great--they are loaded with salt and preservatives. I keep them for very occasional use, which works out well.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Wednesday, December 13, 2006, 11:55pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from lola
I d have wild boar anytime!!
roasted like in the times of king Arthur,with all his knights around the round table!!!!  yummmm!! LOL

here s a quote by Dr D:


the quote won't appear,but that is ok, he said pork is probably ok for most type O's.....HUH? since when????
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, December 14, 2006, 1:15am; Reply: 35
this quote is from the old archives.......
found a post by Edna referring to that post precisely
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archive7/config.pl?read=24575
I m still trying to find that old post........
I have it in my notebook, though, without a link.....(
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Thursday, December 14, 2006, 1:57am; Reply: 36
by "the old archives" do you mean: before the lectin was found or the fact that it is a panhemaglutinin?  I mean this with all due respect, its just that I would eat organic pork if were really ok for O's. As well as wild boar, but Iam sure it also has the same issue as ppork.......???
Posted by: Tham (Guest), Friday, January 19, 2007, 6:43pm; Reply: 37
The facts in Malaysia speak for themselves.

The Chinese are the heaviest pork eaters here, followed
by the Indians. The Malays do not eat pork by virtue of
their religion.

At the last report a few years ago, the overall incidence of cancer
is as follows :

    Chinese - 1 in 4
    Indians   - 1 in 5
    Malays    - 1 in 7

These figures are despite the Malays being the heaviest smokers.

The above ranking order is apparently duplicated in breast, liver
and rectal cancers. I believe this is also true for stomach and
colon cancers. The Indians lead in laryngeal cancer only largely by
virtue of their habit of chewing the betel leaf.

Chinese are well known to have the highest incidence of
nasopharyngeal cancer in the world. Of these, Chinese males
in Malaysia rank the second highest, and Chinese females
are the highest.

I have largely given up on eating pork years ago.


http://www.acrm.org.my/ncr/documents/Launching_Presentation/Overview.ppt

http://www.radiologymalaysia.org/breasthealth/About/FactsNStats.htm

http://www.acrm.org.my/ncr/documents/NCR_First_Report/Introduction.pdf

http://www.pantai.com.my/site.cfm?hid=2&sec=docwrite&dwid=3


The above figures are also despite the Malays being
the heaviest sugar (they have an extremely
sweet tooth) and simple carbohydrate (they really love
starchy, high glycemic index pastries) consumers.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Friday, January 19, 2007, 6:46pm; Reply: 38
Quoted from semmens



FWIW, so do chickens.



FWIW, occasinally, so do dogs.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, January 20, 2007, 1:46am; Reply: 39
jayney-O,
wild boar is supposed to be ok for Os, if you can find a good reliable source.
Posted by: ieatmeatnlikeit, Friday, February 23, 2007, 4:26am; Reply: 40
I've been wanting to add to this thread and see if anyone might comment on something I heard on the radio once about pigs and their "natural diet" It seems that where pigs mostly thrive as a native species they eat mostly fruit allbeit rotting fruit and as such are essential seed dispersal agents of native fruit varieties. I suppose this doesn't change the pig lectin status ;but with all the insight into grass fed as opposed to grain fed diets of other animals I wondered if a true fruitarian pig might actually be healthy to eat ?
Iemnli
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 23, 2007, 4:56am; Reply: 41
no......the lectin is there weather vegetarian or not......
like chicken for Bs.......pork although A like also has.........
http://www.dadamo.com/faq/smartfaq.cgi?answer=988882481&id=988813483
Posted by: nettik (Guest), Monday, February 26, 2007, 4:42pm; Reply: 42
Did you know that a pig can be bitten by a poisonous snake and not die from it?  It simply stores all the toxins in its fat.  Also, as someone mentioned before, The Bible warns not to eat pigs, camels, dogs, or shellfish.  Being an American, I don't think there's a whole lot of temptation to chow down on the camels and dogs, but certainly pork and shellfish.  When you look at the nasty toxic stuff that settles on the ocean floor, which shrimp and lobster then eat and store in their tissues, it's cool to see how once again God provides practical advice for what He knew would happen in our present world :)   Also of interest: there is a book called "Body by God" which is eerily similar to the type O diet...no dairy, no wheat, no pork, etc...with very few deviations in any food category.  Think about it- Type O was the 1st on the planet, the most common type in the world...My husband and I still follow the BTD (both O+), but it's cool to see how it matches with this Biblically-based book.  
Posted by: 1502 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 9:42pm; Reply: 43
I got to admit pork is gross. Nettik that was a interesting post. I did not know about the shellfish in the bible.
Posted by: JoanneO, Tuesday, March 27, 2007, 4:08pm; Reply: 44
It has occured to me lately as I have been reading cat food (dry and canned) labels with more care, that I have never seen pork by-products listed.  I am concerned that there seems to be way too much corn and grain, but I've never seen pork listed.  Do Veternarians know something the general public does not?
Posted by: ieatmeatnlikeit, Wednesday, April 18, 2007, 5:23am; Reply: 45
I'm not positive about the details I'll eport here but I seem to remember there was a strong advisory against feeding pork to cats from Anitra Frazier in her book "natural pet care" She stressed that pork fat had a molecular size that effectivly lined the surface of the feline gut like a plastic membrane rendering nutritional absorbtion more and more untenable as the fat lodged in and clogged the remaining stomata with each meal that might include pork.I recall humans not being subject to her warning however because she preseumed our cells allow the fat to be absorbed (so it can destroy our kidney's?)
Iemnli
Posted by: The Pen, Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 10:55am; Reply: 46
Once I was told by a doctor that pork is bad for our Body because it's meat is similar to human meat therefore  very bad to digest. The meat stays very much longer, rots and causes inflammations in the whole organism (I know again much to late!)
Posted by: 992 (Guest), Friday, August 10, 2007, 6:02pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from nettik
The Bible warns not to eat pigs, camels, dogs, or shellfish.  Being an American, I don't think there's a whole lot of temptation to chow down on the camels and dogs, but certainly pork and shellfish.  When you look at the nasty toxic stuff that settles on the ocean floor, which shrimp and lobster then eat and store in their tissues, it's cool to see how once again God provides practical advice for what He knew would happen in our present world :)  


Um... shrimp and other shelfish are eaten by larger predators, which in turn are eaten by yet other predators... which we then eat, with (supposedly) the bad stuff concentrated. From thata perspective, we'd be better off eating the krill and shrimp with only first-level concentrations of 'yuck' in them, versus the game-fish that represent two- or three-times concentration of what the bottom-dwellers ate.

I think that ancient injunctions against eating seafood come from desert-dwellers who only rarely got near the sea and therefore - unlike coastal people - didn't have a clue how to tell a bad clam from a good one, and didn't know that certain algae blooms can temporarily cause the creatures that eat the algae to become toxic.  The coastal dwellers just paid attention to the conditions and the time of year, and their accumulated experience with things from the sea, and did all right.  But the folks who created the stories and the lore that eventually became the bible were more inland dwellers.  Just a thought. Could be wrong.

Quoted Text
Also of interest: there is a book called "Body by God" which is eerily similar to the type O diet...no dairy, no wheat, no pork, etc...with very few deviations in any food category.  Think about it- Type O was the 1st on the planet, the most common type in the world...My husband and I still follow the BTD (both O+), but it's cool to see how it matches with this Biblically-based book.  


There've been some other threads in these forums, to the effect that "O" might not have been first after all.

Kevin
Posted by: ieatmeatnlikeit, Monday, September 3, 2007, 6:00am; Reply: 48
I got fooled twice this summer into thinking what I was eating was not pork but beef in one case and turkey in the other. Don't ask me why but I had seconds too. I liked the taste in both instances but there was a little voice and it went unheeded. I think the effect deep down in the gut is severe in terms of it being putrifyingly not efficient and very gross at the far end . Darn I guess I should be more careful. What if you didn't know and didn't really want to eat pork? Is there a deflect combo for such a failure mode?
iemnli
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, September 3, 2007, 3:50pm; Reply: 49
I'd say just take good old Deflect or NAG, they should get you through.

Yesterday we had BLTs (mine was on ezekiel bread with romaine and no tomatoes) with pork bacon. The bacon was from a local provider and sliced to order (nice and thick!). The first thing I noticed was that there was MUCH less grease in the pan, obviously because the bacon was quite lean. It browned very nicely and didn't pop or burn as much either. The taste was mild and delicious, not salty, greasy and harsh as with commercial bacon. And I haven't noticed any side effects yet at all. Don't feel lethargic, achey or queasy--all symptoms I've had from eating commercial packaged bacon.

So--I still don't plan to eat much bacon. Once or maybe twice a year is enough for me! But when I do indulge, it will be with the best bacon I can find--NOT the nasty supermarket kind.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, September 3, 2007, 3:58pm; Reply: 50
how about some wild boar bacon?
does such a delicatessen exist?
with no nitrates and unsmoked?
Is that too much asking? lol
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, September 3, 2007, 4:06pm; Reply: 51
Thank Google for this link, Lola:

http://www.venisonamerica.com/products/boar.html

The price on wild boar bacon listed here is 5.75 plus shipping--not that much more than high-grade bacon, at least here in the Delaware Valley. I'm definitely going to give this a try. The other prices for chops, roasts etc are not that bad either.

Wild boar, woohoo! :)
Posted by: LarryC., Monday, September 3, 2007, 4:25pm; Reply: 52
Have you ever tryed Turkey Bacon, We us Wellshire Frams Turkey Bacon, it is all most like eating Ham, Very good on BTL on Rye. A good health food store should haveit. or go to http://www.wellshirefarms.com.

Larry
Posted by: OSuzanna, Monday, September 3, 2007, 4:53pm; Reply: 53
Oh, Brighid, thank you for the venisonamerica link!
Though I have 95% given up eating pork, I still love bacon, the more burned to a crisp, the better. Partly I think the nonnie in me is grooving on the salt. I have no intention of giving up the bacon, but will cut way back if/when the ol' bod complains when I've eaten it.
A thought: I generally hate eating fat when eating meat, but oddly always loved nibbling crispy pork fat, feeling guilty (for eating fat) but unable to deny myself the treat. This memory came up when I read the earlier mention of eating pork fat.
Thanks for keeping the thread, guys.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 12:21am; Reply: 54
great link Brighid, thanks!

and enjoy your first batch on my behalf!
Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 12:43am; Reply: 55
Larry--we eat turkey bacon most of the time, which is to say about three times a year *chuckle* I stay away from bacon because it has so much salt and nitrites. There is a local brand we buy called Godshall's, it's pretty good. It's just that every once in a while, I get a mild craving for pork bacon. So it's good to have a couple of sources for high quality pork or wild boar, just for fun. :)
Posted by: 129 (Guest), Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 1:13am; Reply: 56
I self-tested my diet with and without pork a few years back (pre-BTD) and gave up all pork products for a month, then reintroduced them to my diet. YEESH! I felt like a freight train had run me over in my sleep the next day; flu-like symptoms, congestion, headache, muscle aches etc.. I wasn't sure it WASN'T a mild case of the flu, so I ditched pork again for a month and reintroduced it.  BLAM! Same thing again.  I haven't TOUCHED pork in any form since.. (and Oh how I love bacon for cooking and lard for use in pastries and pie crusts!)

I think the culprit is Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus.. all pigs apparently have it, and it doesn't seem to die off even with high temp cooking.  It also shares characteristics with the Murine and Feline Leukemia Virus family. While there has been little to no substantial research on porcine to human transmission, both of those viruses (virii?) have high rates of mutation and tumor causing properties within gene tests on the human genome.  Pretty scary stuff.  

Bright pork-free blessings,
Stephen
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 1:23am; Reply: 57
Stephen here
http://www.dadamo.com/faq/smartfaq.cgi?answer=988882481&id=988813483
Posted by: 119 (Guest), Tuesday, September 4, 2007, 11:12pm; Reply: 58
Pork natually contains an enzime that causes decay, because they are earth cleaners, and they are garbage eaters.  I was reading a book by a doctor who was researching eating healthy, and organic.  He had taken a piece of pork and put it in a petre ( sp. ? ) dish with human tissue, various plant tissues, raw beef and some other stuff I don't remember.  Everything on the dish with the pork, and all were touching it, died exept the pork.  That was enough to make me quit eating it.  I donated my book to a library, but I'm sure I can get the title and the doctors name if anybody wants it.
Posted by: jillthepilllady, Wednesday, September 5, 2007, 6:34pm; Reply: 59
Applegate Farms Turkey Bacon does not contain any nitrates or preservatives.  Salt is still an issue here but it is very tasty.
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Wednesday, December 19, 2007, 8:12pm; Reply: 60
I'm not a big pork lover either. I hate ham. I'll only occassionally eat bacon. My biggest offense was Italian sausage with spaghetti, since I'm Italian, it was one of my mom's holiday meals. I always would feel not well after I ate it. It's easy for me to give up pork. Tomatoes is harder for me to give up. Spaghetti sauce...
Posted by: 2162 (Guest), Sunday, December 30, 2007, 2:55am; Reply: 61
Quoted from 1495
Thanks Mhameline and Peppermint.   I just did a Google on pigs and learned that they eat their own feces, have been known to attack and eat humans and are generally pretty nasty. No pigmeat for me!


Thanks, that did it for me! I'm done now. Not a big pork eater since I started BTD years ago. As of now, I will no longer feel deprived if I don't a piece of bacon! Every once in a while I get weirded out about a food that I'll never eat again. Thanks for sharing!!
Posted by: 2162 (Guest), Sunday, December 30, 2007, 3:04am; Reply: 62
Quoted from OSuzanna
Oh, Brighid, thank you for the venisonamerica link!
Though I have 95% given up eating pork, I still love bacon, the more burned to a crisp, the better. Partly I think the nonnie in me is grooving on the salt. I have no intention of giving up the bacon, but will cut way back if/when the ol' bod complains when I've eaten it.
A thought: I generally hate eating fat when eating meat, but oddly always loved nibbling crispy pork fat, feeling guilty (for eating fat) but unable to deny myself the treat. This memory came up when I read the earlier mention of eating pork fat.
Thanks for keeping the thread, guys.


You just gave me a memory. When I was young, I didn't like meat, only the fat. On the rare occasion we had steak for dinner, I'd eat my fat and divey up my steak for my 5 other siblings in exchange for the fat from their steak. Oddly enough I was skinniest one of the bunch, living on fat.
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, December 30, 2007, 3:53am; Reply: 63
Quoted from 2162


You just gave me a memory. When I was young, I didn't like meat, only the fat. On the rare occasion we had steak for dinner, I'd eat my fat and divey up my steak for my 5 other siblings in exchange for the fat from their steak. Oddly enough I was skinniest one of the bunch, living on fat.



O's are blessed with the ability to handle fats (especially saturated fats) better than the other types.
Posted by: teri, Sunday, December 30, 2007, 4:05am; Reply: 64
Haven't eaten pork for about 2 years now, but I have to say that the best meal I've ever had was stuffed pork chops. Had this in a gourmet restaurant just north of Toronto several year ago and will never forget it.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Sunday, December 30, 2007, 4:24am; Reply: 65
Quoted from JoanneO
It has occurred to me lately as I have been reading cat food (dry and canned) labels with more care, that I have never seen pork by-products listed.  I am concerned that there seems to be way too much corn and grain, but I've never seen pork listed.  Do Veterinarians know something the general public does not?


Same here. Since the latest pet food scare I have been a lot more focused on cat food labels and contents and do not see pork as a content. Makes you wonder.

Posted by: accidental_chef, Friday, January 11, 2008, 9:53am; Reply: 66
How does pork rate in the GTD scheme of things?
Posted by: italybound, Monday, January 14, 2008, 1:44pm; Reply: 67
Pre BTD, I was a big pork eater. We used to get a whole pork loin, cut it in 1" or so pieces and grill it. Oh, now that was a little slice o' heaven, until.............. no more pork for me. I will only have the occasional 'clean' bacon, but nothing else pork related. Even took my own hamburger for Christmas dinner LOL

shoulderblade.........good wondering on why pork isn't used in pet food...........hmmmmmm never thought of that before. should we call a pet food company and ask why?  ;D
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, January 14, 2008, 2:23pm; Reply: 68
IB, if you go to reply #45 in this thread, there's an answer to your question. I don't know if it's accurate, but sounds plausible to me.
Posted by: LarryC., Monday, January 14, 2008, 9:53pm; Reply: 69
Pork has a Bacteria in it that Inflammaton will keep feeding on.

The Welishire Farms Turkey bacon has on additeves in it what so ever.
Posted by: 2273 (Guest), Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 2:22am; Reply: 70
So it is the port itself that is no good or because it is cured and contains nitrates, etc?  Trader Joes carries uncured bacon with no preservatives and tastes great.  Very hard to give up...
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 2:23am; Reply: 71
http://www.dadamo.com/faq/smartfaq.cgi?answer=988882481&id=988813483
;)
Posted by: accidental_chef, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 4:51am; Reply: 72
Quoted from accidental_chef
How does pork rate in the GTD scheme of things?


So is it an avoid for all genotypes? On BTD pork is a Tier 2 avoid (I think..)
Posted by: Brighid45, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 12:15pm; Reply: 73
JMO: if you're an O in good health and you have a local source for pork without additives, or you know for sure the pigs were raised in a healthy environment, or you've got a good source for wild boar--you can indulge occasionally. But it's better just to avoid the stuff entirely. Dr. D has said ingestion of pork is like an infusion of type A antigens . . . not exactly a good thing for most of us. I only use turkey bacon now and don't really miss pork at all.  
Posted by: TJ, Tuesday, January 15, 2008, 6:35pm; Reply: 74
See here:
Parents snort as school enforces pig rearing
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