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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  circadian rhythm for type Os?
Posted by: Chris, Thursday, November 30, 2006, 8:47pm
I see suggestions in LR4YT for type As and type Bs to live in accordance with their circadian rhythms, but I don't see circadian rhythms mentioned in the type O chapter.  Does this mean that type Os don't benefit from living in harmony with a circadian rhythm?  Or do they just handle the stress of staying up late one night a week better than a type A or a type B?  
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Thursday, November 30, 2006, 9:42pm; Reply: 1
yes, they do certainly, but I think that the A's and B's are a bit more in need to have an ::) onto this
because ot their tendencies to live with higher cortisol levels ::) and O's and AB's are more prone to go for the catecholamines as a certain stress-response  :D
Posted by: mikeo, Thursday, November 30, 2006, 10:52pm; Reply: 2
live in accordance with their circadian rhythms, you'll age slower regardless of blood type
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, November 30, 2006, 10:58pm; Reply: 3
Dr D does address this issue:
http://www.dadamo.com/napharm/gkf.htm
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, December 1, 2006, 1:44am; Reply: 4
I think controlling and maintaining circadian rhythm is particularly important for blood type A's because we can have an inclination towards having high cortisol levels, if we do not control our cortisol levels through stress control, food, exercise, and lifestyle choices.  

Alia
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Friday, December 1, 2006, 8:00am; Reply: 5
Lola, die Zauberfee ;) :D
Posted by: Lola, Friday, December 1, 2006, 9:42pm; Reply: 6
;)SüB  :K)
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Saturday, December 2, 2006, 7:01pm; Reply: 7
;D :D :K)
Posted by: italybound, Saturday, December 2, 2006, 11:48pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from PenguinWarrior
I see suggestions in LR4YT for type As and type Bs to live in accordance with their circadian rhythms, but I don't see circadian rhythms mentioned in the type O chapter.  Does this mean that type Os don't benefit from living in harmony with a circadian rhythm?  Or do they just handle the stress of staying up late one night a week better than a type A or a type B?  


An O might get by w/ staying up late one night a week, but do that very often, add some surgeries, accidents, death of loved ones, job changes, stressors period and over the years, you will likely not be able to handle it anymore. Add in some chronic bronchities, sinus issues, asthma, sickness period and your odds are even worse. Once your stress levels are so high and stay high, your adrenals begin to fail. They can't keep up. Staying up late forces your adrenals to basically work a second shift. Doing 2 days work in one. Not good. Getting to bed before 11 PM and getting some decent rest (which def includes your deep sleep portion) is as I understand it, pretty essential to keeping healthy.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 3:58am; Reply: 9
Sounds like the voice of experience speaking, eh, Pat?  :-)
Posted by: italybound, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 4:20am; Reply: 10
Quoted from Victoria
Sounds like the voice of experience speaking, eh, Pat?  :-)


eh....unfortunately yes. I do think the supps are starting to help a bit.  Have a long road ahead but  keeping my fingers crossed.  ;D     NP says the doing BTD puts me ahead of the game. :-)  Chalk up one more great reason to BTD.
Posted by: resting, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 12:44pm; Reply: 11
Hi folks,

perhaps one of the more profound books I have read on this topic is 'Lights Out' by TS Wiley.  In it she explains a little of the hormone shifting induced by sleep.  For BTD this 'shift' happens to all blood types (even to all species) and seems to be THE answer for many common woes.  As one example: an experiment was done on small animals who were specifically bred to develop cancer.  These were split into two groups: A - those that followed regular 'human' schedules for sleeping, and B - a second group that was permitted to sleep whenever they wished.  All other factors like diet were identical.
RESULTS:  the animals in group A got tumours right on schedule and died.  The animals in the B group did not ever get cancer, the researchers couldn't give them cancer by painting their skin with known carcinogens.  Remember that these were specially bred to develop cancer.

The same format overcomes: heart disease, obesity, type II diabetes, etc....

John
Posted by: italybound, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 2:47pm; Reply: 12
Wow John, that is remarkable. And believable. Once you understand how important sleep is and getting it when you should be, it all starts to make sense. I can see how keeping a sleep schedule will help my adrenals heal faster. Knowledge is power. :-) Will def have to pick up that book. I've seen you post it before, but never looked into it. I will now. Your persistance paid off, for me. LOL   ;)   Thanks again.
And how are YOU feeling?
Posted by: resting, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 3:47pm; Reply: 13
Hi IB,

don't know quite how to answer that.  I feeling about the same as before, but assume that I need to travel into some uncharted waters to find more complete health enhancement.  In some ways, I find that BTD is a great start ... eating organic foods and grass-fed meat is beyond my present financial capacities.  I suspect that a whole lot of improvement would not happen, even if I could afford such perfection.

Right now, the fields of proper exercise and energies hold the most promise.

John
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 6:46pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from John_McDonell_O+

. .  These were split into two groups: A - those that followed regular 'human' schedules for sleeping, and B - a second group that was permitted to sleep whenever they wished.  All other factors like diet were identical.
RESULTS:  the animals in group A got tumours right on schedule and died.  The animals in the B group did not ever get cancer, the researchers couldn't give them cancer by painting their skin with known carcinogens.
John


This is interesting, and seems to say the opposite of what I would have thought.  This is saying that the animals who resisted cancer were the ones who were able to sleep whenever they wished, and not on a schedule.  I thought it was best to get in bed before 11 pm and up at daylight.  This seems to be saying that if we are tired, we should allow our bodies to sleep, no matter what time it is, and if we are not sleepy, we should not go to bed until we are.  Is this what she is saying, John?
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 7:18pm; Reply: 15
yes, it is a bit confusing ........hope John gives us his take on this, or perhaps there is a typo in his statement.
Posted by: resting, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 7:30pm; Reply: 16
nope Victoria,

that's the way most humans act now.  She says: to bed when the sun goes down and arise only when it comes up again.  For most temperate zone dwellers, it will mean extended hours roughly 7 months of the year(winter+) ... over 10.5 hours each night (here it's 16.5 around Christmas).  To relax and get to sleep our pineal gland releases melatonin.  Only AFTER melatonin has been released for 3.5 hours does the body release the hormone prolactin.  It is this second hormone that does all the healing.

Modern problem - melatonin is extremely light-sensitive and will cease being released with ANY (even very faint) light.  When it stops, so too does prolactin, and so too does deep healing.

A person who sleeps late, only after lights are turned-out likely never gets this healing ... for decades.  If you wake from sleep, roll over and you'll be asleep within 15 minutes.  Just never expose yourself to any light, even night-lights or red LED-lights on alarm clocks.  [An indigo-purple light is likely OK, but has never been researched.]

John
Posted by: Kristin, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 7:41pm; Reply: 17
I have recently darkened my room as is suggested in the "Lights Out" book and although I haven't started sleeping longer... yet... I have noticed that my sleep is much, much more restful. I rarely wake up now during the night... unless from that midlife heat experience...


::) ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, December 3, 2006, 11:51pm; Reply: 18
Thank you for clarifying, John.  Since the days have become shorter in Oregon, and the nights longer, I always feel that my usual 8 1/2 hours a night in bed is not long enough any more.  Problem is that if I go to bed when I'm really, really tired, that will be at around 9 pm.  I will go right to sleep and then wake up a couple of hours later and have a hard time going back to sleep.

But if I go to bed at 10:45 pm, I'll sleep soundly for 5 or 6 hours before I wake up to change positions.  Perhaps time is needed to retrain the body.
Posted by: italybound, Monday, December 4, 2006, 2:30am; Reply: 19
Quoted from Victoria
This is saying that the animals who resisted cancer were the ones who were able to sleep whenever they wished, and not on a schedule.  I thought it was best to get in bed before 11 pm and up at daylight.  This seems to be saying that if we are tired, we should allow our bodies to sleep, no matter what time it is, and if we are not sleepy, we should not go to bed until we are.  Is this what she is saying, John?


I took this to mean that if we needed extra sleep beyond the sleep we should be getting at night, that it was helpful. I know there are many times thru the day I could use a nap.  :-/           Have actually had to pull over and take a 15 min nap on my drive home ( 1 hour ) many times in the past. Hopefully soon, that will be a thing of the past. :-)
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Monday, December 4, 2006, 3:14am; Reply: 20
Italybound, this has been a huge prob for me too....I am doing well to get 6 hr a night. including one bathroom break at the minimum. Its getting better for me now. using progest cream has helped. I used to get sooooosleepy driving hoime from work...I seriously contemplated pulling over for a nap (but didn't)....it was not as long as your drive but I could swear I slept at the stop light for a second or so.
Posted by: resting, Monday, December 4, 2006, 2:28pm; Reply: 21
Hi IB,

animals (especially wild animals) do have sort of a very strict schedule.  The sun (light/dark) shifts their hormone levels profoundly.  So while many species wake-up at the dark, humans wish to sleep then.  Only humans have clocks and judge the healing of their sleep by the number of clock hours that they sleep.  Too few of us align our sleep patterns with the day/night shift.  Our bodies do make such a shift in hormone levels, but our clocks say that it is not-yet time to sleep.

And then we wonder why we die.  Over and over, I've read that according to our DNA, we should average lives of 120 years ... then why don't we?  Perhaps, it is because we fail to heal properly - a function of prolactin at night.

John
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, December 4, 2006, 2:52pm; Reply: 22
John
I think your comment makes so much sense :-D-
I just made a speak at college as a part of my rhetoric class were I used some of your info - on seasonal eating, and light/ darkness- etc combine with my knowledge on archeology / danish prehistory.
Afterwards- people came to me and asked about more info- but also had the (true) comment that is hard to shift back to a more natural approach on sleep, seasonal eating etc - when you life in a clockoriented busy modern world.
Posted by: italybound, Monday, December 4, 2006, 10:48pm; Reply: 23
http://health.yahoo.com/topic/sleep/overview/article/mayoclinic/8F422495-751C-4684-A0A50B88AB19B576
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, December 4, 2006, 11:44pm; Reply: 24
Interesting site, Pat.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, December 5, 2006, 4:54pm; Reply: 25
I know I am a B- but I donŽt think IŽll make a new thread.( or moderaters feel free to move me :-) )

Kristin wrote that she had started to sleep in darkness- I havnŽt read this book but it sounds interesting- from the info I have got ( and my knowledge from archeology).
I have started this week to darken my bedroom- my neighbour keeps his lights on all night- it is really annoying- so I made new curtains. And yes I did sleep better the last nights.
I used to sleep from 10 to 7 -no problem - but the last years I have to get up at 6 - It irritates me a lot since- I only wake up natural at 6 in the midsummer. TRhe rest of the time it is a hazzle fo me to get up- I hardly ever feel fresh. At the same time I have found my life so stressfull - that I find it hard to go to bed before 11- and I know I need more that 7 hours of sleep in the winter.
I have decide to fix my sleeping habit before anything else.

I seem to do best inthe months april/may  and august/september: I feel so energized and good theese months
I wonder if it is becourse of the natural daylenght of 12- 13 hours in theese months here in Denamrk.
But what are one to do in winter when day is so short?- Accept that night is longer than in the summertime?
And what about in the summer when the night is just 5 hours or so- sleep in complete darkness? or accept that you might be ok with 7 hours sleep ?

What about women and moonlight?
I have always loved to sleep without curtains- liked when the moon showed its bluish light once a month.
My friend told me that she was adviced from her ND to sleep in darkness in all days- except days around fullmoon- to regulate her fertility ???

I would really apreciate some thought on this lights out theory- since I believe this is not a matter that differ from bloodtype to bloodtype- but is pretty universal for all bt ???

Is the book worth buying?
- we do not have it at the library here.
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, December 5, 2006, 6:08pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Is the book worth buying?
- we do not have it at the library here.

It is an interesting book.

Can your library get it from another library, an inter-library loan program? That is what my local library can do. I think it costs me $3 for each book.

Posted by: resting, Tuesday, December 5, 2006, 10:39pm; Reply: 27
Hi Henriette,

I think you have wandered into some not-too-accepted light theory.  Here's a little of what I've been able to figure out:  according to Dinshah(modern colour therapy) there are 12 colours.  He does not divide them this way but 8 of them seem 'day-like' and 4 seem 'night-like'.  The latter four are magenta (looks like sunset), indigo (night sky), violet, purple.  Unseen is nighttime UV ... a reflection of the sun off the moon.  This only happens in lunar cycles (when the moon can be seen in the sky).  [I assume it is these periods that are the main influence on a woman's cycle .... how this is related to fertility is ????????] Because this light is described as colour we tend to underestimate its importance.  If referred to as frequencies of light, we maintain a more-scrutinizing approach.

Most light is bio-utilized when a slow pulsing action is used - @20Hz for daytime frequencies and 4-0.5Hz for nighttime.   Light seems to be best accepted if it is polarized http://www.bioptron.com .  This instrument specifically eliminates night-UV, but perhaps its use can come from reflected 'black light' [it's actual colour is purple-bluish hazy].  It also seems to suit the meridian system http://www.photonstimulator.com .

Imho, the description of many pigments and the description of the colours shows an uncanny symmetry (ie. the indigo of blueberries is almost identical to the effect of the indigo-frequency).  We eat the coloured fruit/vegetable but rarely utilize the energy-colour as a therapeutic tool.

Then there is the profound influence of magnetic energies.  I connect this influence more to the latitudes that are farthest from the equator.  So, it's omega-6's and pigments near equatorial zones and omega-3's for temperate and arctic zones.

John
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, December 5, 2006, 11:11pm; Reply: 28
so much to learn!!!
thanks for sharing John!)
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, December 6, 2006, 2:03am; Reply: 29
Quoted from lola
so much to learn!!! thanks for sharing John!)


Overwhelming sometimes!  And yes, John, thanks so much for sharing. Very interesting. Hoping to pick that book up tomorrow. :-)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, December 6, 2006, 8:08am; Reply: 30
Thanks John- very intersting- IŽll look further into it.

You are asking about fertillity and moonlight.
Well my schoolmate was suffering from unstable periods that came at all kind of weird times- sometimes- it took 21 days other months 46 days- and she found it difficult to get pregnant.
After 2 months of sleeping in darkness most of the time- and sleeping in moonlight a little week- her period got regular with 28 days- and now after 4 months she just told me a week ago that she was pregnant - she has tried for 3 years ! She is an AB- but does not follow btd- but has started to get more open about it ;-)

Don- IŽll see if university libraries have the book- the regular library does not.
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