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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Baked goods without refined sugar
Posted by: colojd, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 11:22pm
Hi, we are avoiding white and brown sugar, and would like to make some baked goods such as banana bread or pumpkin bread. I am looking for links to recipes for "sugar free" (not using sugar substitutes like splenda - we don't like the fake sugars -  and not using white or brown sugar) baked goods. They can contain eggs and oil in reasonable amounts because I know fat free baked goods often have very poor quality.

We also do not use white flour, most of the time use spelt flour since our son is wheat intolerant, so spelt recipes would be helpful, too!

Thanks,
Joyce
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 11:27pm; Reply: 1
You might want to try agave syrup or nectar. It's low on the glycemic scale so it won't spike your blood sugar, but has a nice sweet taste that works well in baked goods. I use it for quickbreads, cookies, muffins, cakes, etc.

Some people use vegetable glycerine, and stevia is another natural choice. You could also try fruit concentrates like pomegranate or blueberry, though they do tend to saturate the batter with their color and taste.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 17, 2006, 1:29am; Reply: 2
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor.cgi?435
substitute accordingly

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor.cgi?331

there are many more recipes in typebase/recibase
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, November 17, 2006, 2:48am; Reply: 3
For the blood types that can have maple syrup, I recommend maple sugar.  It's heavenly instead of sugar.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Friday, November 17, 2006, 2:57am; Reply: 4
You can utilize and substitute almost any recipe using white/brown sugar for a 'real' sweetener: agave, maple sugar, date sugar, rapadura, barley malt syrup, rice syrup, blackstrap molasses, honey, and vegetable glycerine (the one exception that is not a 'whole' sourced sugar.

Alia
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, November 17, 2006, 8:47am; Reply: 5
If you substitute Honey for Sugar:
1>Honey is twice as sweet as Sugar.
2>Then whatever quantity of Honey that turns out to be, reduce the amount of oil in recipe by that amount {and/or liquid}.
Posted by: colojd, Friday, November 17, 2006, 3:11pm; Reply: 6
Thanks everyone. Great tips.
Posted by: italybound, Friday, November 17, 2006, 3:59pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from colojd
We also do not use white flour, most of the time use spelt flour since our son is wheat intolerant, so spelt recipes would be helpful, too!


Joyce, spelt is also a wheat, native to southern Europe and western Asia. Just in case you were not aware.  ;) ;D.
Posted by: colojd, Friday, November 17, 2006, 4:04pm; Reply: 8
I am aware that spelt is an ancient relative of wheat but supposedly does not have properties of modern day wheat.

We buy our own organic spelt berries and grind them into whole grain flour. Our 15 yr old B son really has a hard time with wheat but does not seem to with spelt.

Thanks,
Joyce
Posted by: italybound, Friday, November 17, 2006, 4:17pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from colojd
I am aware that spelt is an ancient relative of wheat but supposedly does not have properties of modern day wheat.
We buy our own organic spelt berries and grind them into whole grain flour. Our 15 yr old B son really has a hard time with wheat but does not seem to with spelt. Thanks,
Joyce


That's great. Not everyone can deal w/ spelt. Glad you have found something your son can tolerate. (sunny)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, November 17, 2006, 5:26pm; Reply: 10
Barley and millet make good flours for B's if he is just wheat intolerant and not celiac. I use vegetable glycerine for baking my self. Use in most any recipe at the rate of half as much as the amount of sugar listed.
Posted by: colojd, Friday, November 17, 2006, 6:25pm; Reply: 11
Have some millet so will give it a try. Thought barley was an avoid for B's. When my son or I eat even sprouted barley, just does not set well.
Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, November 17, 2006, 6:33pm; Reply: 12
If you are looking for a halfway decent substitute for cornmeal, some of us use millet flour/quinoa flour, on a 1:1 ratio. It makes a pretty good 'corn' bread or tortilla (Melissa J adds some rice flour to the tortillas to make them a bit more flexible). Quinoa has that nice slightly acid edge that good cornmeal has, and it tastes just a bit like cornmeal, to me at least. :)
Posted by: colojd, Friday, November 17, 2006, 7:39pm; Reply: 13
Thanks, sounds good.
Posted by: italybound, Friday, November 17, 2006, 10:31pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Brighid45
If you are looking for a halfway decent substitute for cornmeal, some of us use millet flour/quinoa flour, on a 1:1 ratio. It makes a pretty good 'corn' bread or tortilla (Melissa J adds some rice flour to the tortillas to make them a bit more flexible). Quinoa has that nice slightly acid edge that good cornmeal has, and it tastes just a bit like cornmeal, to me at least. :)


Brig to the rescue once again!!  Dearle, would you happen to have a nice 'cornbread' recipe you could share w/ us?  :D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 12:33am; Reply: 15
If you have problems with barley, that really sounds like celiac also known as gluten intolerance. If this is so the only safe grains for you as a B would be millet and rice.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 12:55am; Reply: 16
Millet "Corn"Bread is in recibase IB! )
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 2:42am; Reply: 17
Brown rice flour works well for many baked recipes--it's not as fine as white rice flour or sweet rice flour.  I used to bake with it alot in the past, and I believe it provides comparable results to spelt baked products.

I may have also used a partial ratio of oat flour.  However, you could probably substitute 100% of the brown rice flour for the spelt flour with good results.

Alia
Posted by: italybound, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 3:55am; Reply: 18
Quoted from lola
Millet "Corn"Bread is in recibase IB! )


Thanks Lola!  ;)
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 4:02am; Reply: 19
;)
Posted by: colojd, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 5:20pm; Reply: 20
We sometimes use the raw type sugar called demarra sugar. It is the kind that is not fully refined and has the brown cane juice in it. Has kind of a molasses taste to it. I am guessing that because it is not as refined, has more of the natural nutrients. Anyone know info about this sugar?
Posted by: italybound, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 5:58pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from colojd
We sometimes use the raw type sugar called demarra sugar. It is the kind that is not fully refined and has the brown cane juice in it. Has kind of a molasses taste to it. I am guessing that because it is not as refined, has more of the natural nutrients. Anyone know info about this sugar?


Oh yes, I think it may also be called rapadura. I started a thread on this last year. It was decided it was a no-no. In a later thread, it was decided it was ok. So, who knows?  ??)
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 7:24pm; Reply: 22
http://www.dadamo.com/forum/archivea/config.pl?read=76804

the issue is only for B nons....
Posted by: colojd, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 8:04pm; Reply: 23
Thanks for the link.

I will check the product we have, don't think it is sucanat but have seen that in stores. All I know is that it is a coarser grain sugar and is brown in color and I think the package said it was cold expelled to keep the cane juice in it. Did have a molasses type flavor. I found if using it in cooking/baking you almost had to soften it in a liquid otherwise it stayed kind of coarse in the final product.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Sunday, November 19, 2006, 9:05pm; Reply: 24
I believe rapadura is considered the only 'true', unrefined sugar on the market.  

If it's not at one's HFS, grocery store, or Whole Foods one can order it through Rapunzel:
http://www.rapunzel.com/products/rapunzel/rapunzel_baking_rapadura.html


Alia
Posted by: colojd, Sunday, November 19, 2006, 9:17pm; Reply: 25
Thanks!
Posted by: Schluggell, Monday, November 20, 2006, 1:31pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from colojd
Have some millet so will give it a try. Thought barley was an avoid for B's. When my son or I eat even sprouted barley, just does not set well.


Its a neutral in TYPEBase for both Seccies and Nonnies...

I don't have that much trouble with Barley - but personally the unpolished whole Barley is much easier on me {most food barley is Pearl {Polished}} and I do the GABA-method with it {soak in warm water 8-10 hours before cooking}.

A brewer supply that sells bulk grains can help you out....
Posted by: colojd, Monday, November 20, 2006, 1:46pm; Reply: 27
Thanks for that information.
Posted by: Jane, Monday, November 20, 2006, 3:28pm; Reply: 28
colojd,
Are you talking about turbinado sugar?  That's what it sounds like.
Jane
Posted by: colojd, Monday, November 20, 2006, 3:34pm; Reply: 29
Yes, I am sure that was what I was thinking of. there is also one that I saw yesterday at Wild Oats made by a company called Florida's Crystals. It is a little finer but same process - they just squeeze out the cane juice without refining it.
Posted by: italybound, Monday, November 20, 2006, 3:49pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from colojd
Yes, I am sure that was what I was thinking of. there is also one that I saw yesterday at Wild Oats made by a company called Florida's Crystals. It is a little finer but same process - they just squeeze out the cane juice without refining it.


Sounds just like Rapadura, so I'm now wondering if they are really the same thing......(sunny)
Posted by: colojd, Monday, November 20, 2006, 4:28pm; Reply: 31
Yes, I am sure there are probably several companies that make this.
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 2:21pm; Reply: 32
Do you know much about stevia? In the alternative area, it is considered a sweetener, but apparently the FDA does not allow  it to be advertised as a sugar substitute altho all the other toxic subs are allowed to make the claim.
Do you know much about this?
I heard about this on Robert Scott Bell, a program that talks about nutrition & our rights to have 'health freedom.' He's on 1-4 PM Eastern time (12-3 for me) Sundays.  I live in this huge city of Chicago, but have to hear this show on a station in Benton Harbor, Michigan!  It's amazing how sometimes health knowledge is kept from the public.  Local stations here have inane infomercials about health products, which I assume are good, but they don't have this lively informative program that is priority for me to listen to.  I have my portable radio tuned to it as I walk the 2 miles home from church, then keep listening at home.  I probably have turned down low priority social events at that time to make sure I listen.  For you who live in NW Indiana, Western (lower peninsula) Michigan & near the lake in NE Illinois, try WHFB 1060 on the dial at the times I mentioned.
S S & L,
Mrs "T"    O+
PS It's a national program & he has guests.  I'm sure he would love to have Dr. D. on the show.  He also has a web site. He's a younger, enthusiastic guy who was raised on 'big pharma' & finally healed himself with good methods.
Posted by: colojd, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 3:15pm; Reply: 33
Sounds like a great radio show. I do hope that Dr. D is able to get out there on his show.

I like you comment that health information is being kept from the public. This is truly and understatement because the big pharamceutical companies just run the medical profession. I have heard that the upcoming wave of health will be natural healing, immunology and other related interests. I am sure this has come about because people have found their doctors uninformed and basically pill and surgery pushers.

A couple of weeks ago, there was a very short mention on our local news that doctors are looking to try to figure out why some people never get flu shots, and either do not get the flu or get by without a bad case of it. They said the doctors were "scrambling" to work on this information to see if it could be used in the event of the avian flu epidemic.

I don't know anything about stevia (and I even thing some natural herbs and compounds maybnot be good for you just because they are "natural") but you are also right that the FDA will approve complex and strange chemicals like nutrasweet as a good and safe thing to consume but other things are not approved.

Reading a a good book called "8 Weeks to Vibrant Health".  It provides a great overview to how our lives get so out of whack just with bad diet, hectic lifestyle and more. I think it is a great thing to partner with the BTD. She points out how so many ailments have common reasons and there are common reasons and solutions to how to fix them.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 1:05am; Reply: 34
splenda is everywhere and approved!!!
stevia isn t ........but hey aspartame IS!!! (that gets you thinking, doesn t it?)

it s all about big bucks and monopolization.......we are lucky to have opened our minds through BTD and can make educated picks on most products out there!

Stevia leaf is a natural product that has been used for at least 400 years as a food product, principally as a sweetener or other flavoring agent.
Stevia is an avoid for type O non-secretors and type B secretors

Splenda is basically a man-made toxin. Sugar fused with chlorine.
Posted by: 671 (Guest), Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 1:32am; Reply: 35
Lola,  I've been trying to get the DH to give up his Splenda.  He knows that it is as you said "sugar fused with chlorine" but he wants to know what affect this chlorine has on his body.  He has two packets of Splenda in his coffee each morning and that's it. I don't know his blood type yet, I ordered the typing kit today (along with my secretor test! Hooray!) I think he is possibly a B because he eats dairy without problem and lost weight on the Atkins diet.  Could someone shed some light on the affect for us?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 1:35am; Reply: 36
I believe it is toxic.......try a google search......there must be loads of info concerning chloride.
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 3:35am; Reply: 37
One affect of excess chlorine in the body is to flush out iodine...  There are four halogen elements; iodine, bromine, chlorine, and flourine.  Each of the higher level halogen elements will flush the lower level halogen elements out of the body.  Iodine, the most necessary of these elements is flushed out by the other three...  It is very difficult to supplement iodine using salt since the chlorine in salt will flush out more iodine than is included in the salt...  The iodine deficiency could be greater after the "supplementation" than before!
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 3:54am; Reply: 38
thanks for the info on iodine!
Posted by: 671 (Guest), Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 12:08pm; Reply: 39
Thanks ABJoe for the reply on the effects of the chlorine.  I will use that to do a thorough search so that I have some "ammunition" for the "Splenda elimination"!  These forums are so helpful.  Thanks to all of you who participate!  :)
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