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Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 10, 2006, 3:44pm
Does anyone have some creative, delicious ideas for Thanksgiving turkey stuffing, sans grains?  I am craving my own 100% rye stuffing, and, imho, it wouldn't be the end of the world to indulge in a compliant-grain stuffing on a major holiday if one wanted to, as a lifestyle is just that, a lifestyle, not a prison.  But anyway, even though I'm kinda pining for "regular" stuffing, the bigger part of me does not want to eat grains, even on my fave holiday and in one of my fave forms (I'm a stuffing person!).  I will be happier if I do stick to my new grain-free O nonnie lifestyle.

So, that said and that decision made, any ideas?  My mom (who will be my guest) does not care for sweet potato, or I might try to do a stuffing with sweet potato.  Instead, I'm thinking of going with an avoid but at least it isn't a grain avoid, and that is:  one of the smaller, more colorful variety of little potatoes, such as red bliss or new potatoes or one of the really interesting blue or orange varieties they have now of small potatoes, mixed with lots of onions and then I would need something crunchy in there such as crushed nuts or something, yet it might be bad to cook nuts as long as the turkey cooks (I make my stuffing IN the bird).

Any creative grain-free stuffing ideas, please post them in this thread, whether it is an entire recipe or just an ingredient that you think would be good.

I'm trying to come up with a stuffing recipe that will be comparable to taste and texture of the real thing.  You know how traditional stuffing has that wonderful combo of textures, somewhat soft yet with carmelized, crunchy bits (okay, getting hungry here!).  Well, I think if I use the red bliss or whatever taters (probably not mashed, but more cut up into small pieces or finely chopped, to allow each piece to carmelize, hopefully) and a big amount of onions and maybe some other finely chopped veggies that can hold up to hours of cooking, like celery and whatever, and then a lot of delicious spices like sage...would I have something?  And should I carmelize the cut-up or finely chopped taters and other finely chopped veggies FIRST, on the stovetop, BEFORE stuffing the bird, or just let everything cook in the bird?  It might carmelize even with all the juices of the bird, because regular stuffing does...but bread behaves differently than veggies.

Any ideas, experiences, recipes, suggestions, etc. are WELCOME (read:  begged for *lol*) here.  And Brig, maybe a blog on compliant Thanksgiving stuffings, including a grain-free variety, would be in order at some pre-Thanksgiving point?  I mean, I'm just riffing and it is entirely up to you, but it would rock as a blog topic.  Meanwhile, let's get this thread going:

Grain-free stuffing ideas, please!
:) :D :K)
Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:04pm; Reply: 1
Hey twin--in this part of the country (eastern PA) mashed potato stuffing is a tradition! Let me see if I can find you a good recipe.

The fire company in the little town where I work always has a 'potato filling order day' in November. You put in an order for so many pounds and pick it up a couple of days before Thanksgiving. It's different, but delicious.

*wistful sigh* I really miss my mom's cornbread stuffing. It's still my favorite (shh, you didn't hear that from me). She would bake buttermilk cornbread (not sweet at all, but tangy and mellow), crumble it up and add in a chopped apple and sage and onions and celery, and the result was . . . well, full of avoids, but yummalicious all the same! ;)

Okay, thanks a lot--now I want stuffing! LOL
Posted by: geminisue, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:13pm; Reply: 2
I just checked squash out and it is neutral for all in typebase.  How do you think a mixture of different kind of squashes would go with the normal additions of a regular stuffing, Onions, celery, sage etc. even some compliant nuts.  And if the crunch is absolutely necessary maybe save a few veggies and nuts to throw in when it is finished ( maybe even on your own serving) (maybe partially cooked) I haven't been a squash eater except for zucchini and pumpkin, but what the hay, might as well try! Maybe even some greens blended in for more color(spinach). MMMM sounds kinda tempting.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:19pm; Reply: 3
Well it might take some experimenting but apples/onions/celery/nuts are a combination I have heard of before as well as celeriac. Personally I don't stuff a turkey other then put a couple of lemons in for flavor. Why don't you try foodtv.com? I'd look for you but our at work web nanny doesn't let us go to leisure sites or forums, something about this url slips through the cracks luckily. Remember the Thanksgiving/hannukah/yule/christmas/new year's eve/superbowl party  is the undoing of many of the best laid plans. Then January2 till march 1st the gyms are over flowing.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:26pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Brighid45
Hey twin--in this part of the country (eastern PA) mashed potato stuffing is a tradition! Let me see if I can find you a good recipe.

1.  You're kidding?!!  So, I didn't invent this?  Day-uuum.

2.  You'd think I'd know about this, given the fact that my dad was Pennsylvania-Dutch and his family goes WAY back, root-wise, and I know all about exotic-to-the-rest-of-the-country things like "red beet eggs".

3.  I'm so glad to hear this, because that means this might turn out FABULOUSLY!  I mean, how bad could any kind of potato or root veggie be if it soaks up enough FAT, that is my question *lol*!

Quoted Text
*wistful sigh* I really miss my mom's cornbread stuffing. It's still my favorite (shh, you didn't hear that from me). She would bake buttermilk cornbread (not sweet at all, but tangy and mellow), crumble it up and add in a chopped apple and sage and onions and celery, and the result was . . . well, full of avoids, but yummalicious all the same! ;)

Brig, I know it won't be exactly the same, but perhaps you could find a cornbread substitute and use all the other ingredients (yes, even the apple, as it is Thanksgiving and you are a secretor anyway so you can have them so why am I even adding this parenthetical bitty-boo?  Me no know...moving along) and it would be, while not "like momma used to make", "yummalicious"* all the same.  Cornbread stuffing is delicious and unique, there is no getting around that, but at the same time, you being a secretor and all (I know, I know, you are a nonnie in every way except secretor status *lol*...but again, this is Thanksgiving, go a hair wild), you could use ryebread and I think the results could be similar.  I've had excellent results making stuffing using the French Meadows 100% rye w/flaxseed bread.  I take it out of the freezer and just leave it at room temp for a few days, of course, and then I can't remember but I think it turns out better if you toast it first, or perhaps it would be even better if you did 'er up in a pan, stovetop, with ghee and spices, and then add it to the turkey at the last minute.  That's all too much work for this lazy pup, so at most I have toasted it and then I tear it all up, mix in my spices and I sometimes put oysters in there because I'm weird, and YAY!  DELICIOUS.  I imagine if you used your mom's exact recipe with that ryebread, it would really be, while different from the cornbread variety, DELICIOUS!

* Please tell me you aren't mesmerized by that Rachel Ray pup...are ya?  If so, our twin status will really have to be reviewed, if you take into consideration the Mick Jagger anomaly as well.  I mean, RR has a beautiful smile, but that's about as far as it goes with me, mesmerization-wise, because I find her perkiness level to be off the acceptable range of the chart, truly.  She blinds me with perkiness.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:28pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from geminisue
I just checked squash out and it is neutral for all in typebase.  How do you think a mixture of different kind of squashes would go with the normal additions of a regular stuffing, Onions, celery, sage etc. even some compliant nuts.  And if the crunch is absolutely necessary maybe save a few veggies and nuts to throw in when it is finished ( maybe even on your own serving) (maybe partially cooked) I haven't been a squash eater except for zucchini and pumpkin, but what the hay, might as well try! Maybe even some greens blended in for more color(spinach). MMMM sounds kinda tempting.

Thought of squash but I'm just not sure how it will hold up to the length of time we are talking about in the bird, i.e., many hours.  I'm thinking some sort of root veggie (be it sweet potato, other potato varieties, kohlrabi--which I have yet to find anywhere, even at the WF one hour from my house--rutebaga, etc.) would hold up better and be more "breadlike" in texture.  However, squash is a thought and I will keep it in mind.  Keep the great ideas coming!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:34pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Well it might take some experimenting but apples/onions/celery/nuts are a combination I have heard of before as well as celeriac. Personally I don't stuff a turkey other then put a couple of lemons in for flavor. Why don't you try foodtv.com? I'd look for you but our at work web nanny doesn't let us go to leisure sites or forums, something about this url slips through the cracks luckily. Remember the Thanksgiving/hannukah/yule/christmas/new year's eve/superbowl party  is the undoing of many of the best laid plans. Then January2 till march 1st the gyms are over flowing.

APPLES!  gcg, why and how are you such a genius?  Apples!  Apples, I tell you!  I'd much rather "cheat" with apples than with any variety of potato (although I wasn't planning to stress about the potato because Thanksgiving is my fave holiday and stuffing is KEY (lol), so that is one time a little avoid would be worth it (oh--I haven't told youzzz all about the dessert menu yet *lol*), but NOT wheat, which is NEVER worth it to me (almost never--never say never, I say) and not even grains, even compliant ones, for me, because that is me as an individual--we are all different, yay--viva la difference!

Apples, apples, apples, omg, how beautiful!  The only thing still in the potatoes favor is that I'm wondering if apples will hold up as well to the hours of in-the-bird cooking.  Apples might be one stuffing that would be better done stovetop at the end, just before serving the meal.  You could cook it up with the onions, celery and nuts (omg, you ROCK) that you describe, in some of the drippings from the turkey and/or some ghee.  Still, I am wedded to cooking stuffing in the bird, don't ask me why, but I just wonder if it would hold up.  GREAT suggestion and I'll look into it.  Maybe I could use apples in there, even if I go with a red bliss or whatever...

Posted by: mhameline, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:35pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Edna


* Please tell me you aren't mesmerized by that Rachel Ray pup...are ya?  If so, our twin status will really have to be reviewed, if you take into consideration the Mick Jagger anomaly as well.  I mean, RR has a beautiful smile, but that's about as far as it goes with me, mesmerization-wise, because I find her perkiness level to be off the acceptable range of the chart, truly.  She blinds me with perkiness.
Okay, thanks a lot--now I want stuffing! LOL


Gotta say I agree with you on Rachel Ray - she's way too perky for her own good!!  She may have some good ideas for recipies but I just can't handle listening to her actually speak for more than about a minute.  It's grating on my nerves!!  :o
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:38pm; Reply: 8
Carrots/parsnips/onions with ghee and sage? The French stuff geese with prunes but then they eat snails also. Mushrooms/onions and...?
Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:43pm; Reply: 9
Check out my blog, y'all. :)

I do like Rachel Ray's recipes, and I do like her 'old' show, 30 Minute Meals. I do NOT like her talk show, which is way too hyper for me. But on 30MM (imo anyway) she is a lot tamer, and her recipes are generally pretty decent and easily converted over to BTD standard.

The cornbread stuffing is pretty good changed over to quinoa/millet, I've tried it . . . but you know how it is. Sometimes you just want something the way it used to be. And I can't do mom's cornbread because corn trashes me big time. So . . . it stays in memory, and that's fine. I can live with that. Five minutes of something tasting good isn't worth days of pain, memory fog, and emotional lability (in other words, turning meaner than heck). No thanks.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 10, 2006, 4:50pm; Reply: 10
ezequiel bread, celery and almonds with ghee very tasty.....
Posted by: Drea, Friday, November 10, 2006, 5:04pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Edna
Apples, apples, apples, omg, how beautiful!  The only thing still in the potatoes favor is that I'm wondering if apples will hold up as well to the hours of in-the-bird cooking.  Apples might be one stuffing that would be better done stovetop at the end, just before serving the meal.  You could cook it up with the onions, celery and nuts (omg, you ROCK) that you describe, in some of the drippings from the turkey and/or some ghee.  Still, I am wedded to cooking stuffing in the bird, don't ask me why, but I just wonder if it would hold up.  GREAT suggestion and I'll look into it.  Maybe I could use apples in there, even if I go with a red bliss or whatever...



If you can find some jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes), they have the texture of potatoes (imo) and the taste of mushrooms. Might be worth a try.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 10, 2006, 5:07pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from lola
ezequiel bread, celery and almonds with ghee very tasty.....

Sorry, disqualified *lol*:  ezekiel bread is grain-based.  The goal here is grain-free stuffing, although that does sound goooooooood!

Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, November 10, 2006, 5:21pm; Reply: 13
Btw GCG, I make sweet potatoes in the slow cooker with onions, currants and some garlic-infused ghee that had one of my coworkers tell me "Man, that is off the CHAIN!" It really is good if I say so myself, and I like it in place of stuffing nowadays, since I can't have mom's cornbread :) You can add sauteed celery and apples if you like also. Just peel and cut the sweet potatoes into chunks about the size of a small egg, stack them in the slow cooker, mix in the sauteed onions (I cut mine into rings and fry them in ghee until they just turn translucent), and anything else you want to add, mix it around a bit, and pour some melted garlic-ghee over all, just enough to thinly coat everything. Then set on low and let cook for about 4-6 hours or until done. If the slow cooker is packed full it'll take longer. This is sooooo good!
Posted by: geminisue, Friday, November 10, 2006, 5:39pm; Reply: 14
How about cooking the turkey stuffing free for the first 2-2 1/2 hrs, than adding it (the apple stuffing)and cooking the rest of the way. ( Of course being very careful because of the heat) or

cooking it in bird- removing it early placing it in muffin papers and baking it to get a crispy top.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 10, 2006, 6:18pm; Reply: 15
how about cubed artichoke hearts with the celery and the almonds.......for a savory stuffing.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Friday, November 10, 2006, 7:07pm; Reply: 16
Oh, Lola, that sounds so good.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 10, 2006, 7:37pm; Reply: 17
we might just as well just give it a try, right?  lol
I do prefer the sweet potatoe as a side dish.....savory, though.

and also the touch of sweetness from the cranberry relish or jam.....
no sweet tasting stuffing for me, thanks!
Posted by: eh, Friday, November 10, 2006, 11:38pm; Reply: 18
Sauteed ground lamb, onions, garlic, a handful of pine nuts, a bucket of parsley (with stalks), salt and pepper. I know you are not having grains, pt -  but for the others who may be interested you may also fry in a handful of raw rice. The rice cooks inside the bird as it absorbs the moisture together with the additional flavours oozing from the turkey's innards.  This stuffing can handle the long cooking, and improves over time, in any case.

Or use wild rice with the ground lamb.

The mix of different types of flesh - turkey and lamb - works! I make this most Xmases.
eh
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 10, 2006, 11:43pm; Reply: 19
very appetizing!
Posted by: Melissa_J, Saturday, November 11, 2006, 1:38am; Reply: 20
Lamb in turkey...that sounds really good!

I don't know what I'll do, maybe I'll try my usual thanksgiving risotto with brown rice instead of white.  Maybe I'll stuff it with dandelion... :D
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, November 11, 2006, 3:09am; Reply: 21
I used to make lamb/turkey sausage patties, it is really good

how about this,

rutabega cubes
turnip cubes
sweet potato /carrot cubes

garlic
onion
celery
seasonings

turkey/lamb

wha-la stuffing
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, November 11, 2006, 7:28pm; Reply: 22
I like the idea of the contrast of meats by adding the sauteed ground lamb.

I would caramalize onions separately;  And also, separately, stir-fry sliced shitake musrooms (or your other fav. mushrooms) in some ghee until they are the tiniest bit crisp, and add them.  And celery is a must, in my opinion.

And to that, can go your starch, one or all:  parsnips, rhutabagas, jerusalem artichokes, a tiny amount of sweet potato (not enough for your mom to notice),
And some apples, and lots of walnuts, very coarsley broken, to leave some good-sized chunks.

I vote yes on the prunes.  There is a local Mexican cook around here who puts a whole pitted prune in each tamale.  Pre-BTD, I used to buy them and wait eagerly until I reached the prune inside!  She was famous for those hidden prunes!  :-)
Posted by: eh, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 4:31am; Reply: 23
Something I would try if I were an O...stuff your turkey with a duck inside which you stuff a chicken inside which you stuff a quail...you get the picture.

It's something like the culinary equivalent of a Russian Doll or should I say, more correctly, a Soviet Union doll so as to take into account the different 'ethnicities' ;D
(That is, Inside The Sviet Union doll one finds the Russian doll inside which is Ukraine inside which is Georgia inside which is Chechnya inside which is Belarus etc..) ;D
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 5:30am; Reply: 24
brilliant, Madge!!!
and inside the quail stuffed pâté from all the livers!  
Posted by: Laura P, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 5:45am; Reply: 25
My health food store sells this, called a Turducken, the thought of it sort of scares me to be honest with you, makes me think of canabolistic poultry or something, yikes...
Posted by: eh, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 6:59am; Reply: 26
oh, yeah, the liver pate, Lola, it's the ultimate decadent finishing touch :) I love that you thought of the decadence in food. It reminds you how much moral sense and also non-sense we attach to the food we prepare and consume.

Laura, deal with the fear, dear:) I do know what you mean. It is an exceptionally 'Freudianly' conceived dish :D
It resonates with so many of Freud's essays on notions of civilisation, totem and taboo, and the uncanny, all of which are underwritten by the desperately stupid desire to plug (in both senses of the word) the notion of a lack - this gap in the bird  (stuffing the bird....ahem...Freud loved puns, seeing them as the signs of the unconscious at work...)..

I mean what's the problem with no stuffing? :) Well let me tell you, according to Freud's terms, the lack of a stuffing would force us to confront the (sexual) terror that is sparked in seeing nothing!! (That is, not seeing a phallus.) So you see, PT, in insisting on a stuffing we are betraying our fear of castration - a fear that is inherent in all our acts of stuffing the turkey. This is the fear that is at the heart of the unconscious. Along with desire. But that's another bird.

BTW I'm not a Freudian, I just happen to know his writings...Anyway, stuff Freud, I am wondering what the French feminist deconstructionists would do with the bird...

Something really funny comes to mind...brain-free sweetmeats (sheep's testicles?), anyone? hehhheeeehehehe  :X
Posted by: Laura P, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 7:04am; Reply: 27
ha ha, this has got to be the funniest thing I ever read, I will not say all of the funny freudian comebacks running through my head or this thread would be banned
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 3:08pm; Reply: 28
how about eggs???  lol (duck, cornish, quail and chicken)
wonder what Freud would say to that?
Posted by: Brighid45, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 7:07pm; Reply: 29
Lola and Laura P--LOL!!   Otherwise, no comment.

I vote for wild rice. It makes a really good stuffing. You just need a little extra turkey broth or stock on hand as it tends to be a bit dry, but the fragrance and taste is well worth the extra effort.

The lamb-turkey combination sounds good too. I'll have to try that for myself, as my roomie doesn't do lamb at all.

My roomie made a dish last night that would be a great stuffing substitute for those of us who can have dairy. It's a spinach-artichoke casserole with fresh parsley, mushrooms, onions, garlic, and some sour cream, topped with cheese. She used all-organic sour cream and manchego (sheep's milk) cheese. I will admit to having some, as dairy doesn't bother me as much as other avoids do, and it was wonderfully savory in the best stuffing tradition without being too rich. Here's the recipe:

Spinach-Artichoke Casserole (with compliant substitutes)

Stir together:

2-10 oz/app. 550g frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well-drained
1-14 oz/400g can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped
1-10 3/4oz/app. 300g can cream of mushroom soup, undiluted
(we made a creamy roux with butter, rice flour and some rice milk and added in some chopped portobello mushroom stems)
1-8 oz/240 ml sour cream
(light is good here--you could also sub plain unsweetened soy or goat's milk yogurt)
3 green onions, chopped
(we used half a large white onion--you could substitute shallots here if you like)
2 tablespoons/30 ml all-purpose flour
(we didn't use any flour and the casserole came out just fine)
1 tablespoon/15 ml fresh parsley, minced
1/4 t/app 1 ml worcestershire sauce (opt)

Saute for 5 minutes:

1 tablespoon/15 ml butter or ghee
2 garlic cloves, pressed or minced
1 tablespoon/15 ml lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon/2.5 ml pepper (opt)

Add saute to spinach mixture.

Add:

1 cup/225g shredded cheese--manchego, parmesan, jack, etc.
(you can reduce this amount by up to half and still get the lovely sharp taste of the cheese)

Spoon into a lightly buttered casserole dish. Top with 1 cup/225g cheese. Bake at moderately hot/200C/400F/Gas Mark 6 for 30 minutes. Serves 4-6 generously.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 7:27pm; Reply: 30
Oh, eh,
You are a jewel!  :-)

and, LauraP,
 
and Lola!!!  

Oh, my goodness!!!  I will never look at a stuffed turkey in the same way again!   :o
Posted by: Kristin, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 7:30pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from eh

BTW I'm not a Freudian, I just happen to know his writings...Anyway, stuff Freud, I am wondering what the French feminist deconstructionists would do with the bird...


omigod eh... your really made me guffaw today... thanks so much!!! ;D ;D ;D :K)

Quoted from eh
Something really funny comes to mind...brain-free sweetmeats (sheep's testicles?), anyone? hehhheeeehehehe  :X


Hmmm...  if you really want to grab the bull by the horns  ;D... for the O's in the crowd we have Rocky Mountain Oysters... how about those for a stuffin'"???

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/RockyMtnOyster.htm


;D ;D ;D ;D
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 8:24pm; Reply: 32
nice! )
Posted by: eh, Sunday, November 12, 2006, 11:13pm; Reply: 33
OMG, Lola and Kristin...you are flushed out!! Eggs or oysters?!!!! This is IFDGS, no less.
(Instinctive Feminist Deconstructionist Genius Stuffing).
Lola, to answer your question, what would Freud say? Herr Freud would say what he always said, "Penis substitutes, all!"

....geeez, did she really say, OYSTERS?
too much hhhahahahahha, (and how delicious would that be, eh)
Posted by: Laura P, Monday, November 13, 2006, 12:41am; Reply: 34
Well all I can say is I certainly hope Freud didn't eat the turkey after he 'stuffed' it, a bit like a praying matis, eh?
Posted by: eh, Monday, November 13, 2006, 1:08am; Reply: 35
More cannibalistic allusions, Laura?! :D eh
You are headed for The Couch my dear!
;D
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, November 13, 2006, 5:35pm; Reply: 36
To be said with a Chandler-Bingian word enunciation:

Well, could the BTD community BE any more creative?

I am wowed!  Wowed!  From prunes to rutabagas, we have it all in here, people!  If it isn't in this thread, your bird doesn't need to be stuffed with it!  Speaking of which, eh, thank you for the Freudian primer on the psychosocial roots of turkey stuffing and why the idea of a Thanksgiving turkey sans stuffing strikes fear into every fiber of our being!  This cultural anthropology and sociology major, and keen and stunned observer of all things human really appreciated it!


Well, I'm off to research whether wild rice is a grain or a grass or what the flip it is.  I knew at one point and now I've forgotten.  Darn that Dr. Rod and his short-wave diathermy to the head.  I've never been the same since...
Posted by: Drea, Monday, November 13, 2006, 5:52pm; Reply: 37
From Cook's Thesaurus:

wild rice = Indian rice  Shopping hints:  This isn't a rice, but rather a grass seed.  Compared to rice, it's richer in protein and other nutrients and has a more distinctive, nutty flavor.  The downside is that it's more expensive than rice and takes longer to cook.  It's especially good with poultry and game.  Cultivated wild rice isn't as expensive--nor as flavorful--as "wild" wild rice.  Substitutes:  wild pecan rice OR brown rice (not as chewy or flavorful).
Posted by: 379 (Guest), Monday, November 13, 2006, 8:11pm; Reply: 38
Mmm.  I might have to add that spinach artichoke casserole to my Thanksgiving menu.  Sounds delicious!

I just went to an early Thanksgiving potluck yesterday and I made kale and chard (complete with the stems for extra crunch) with carmelized onions, lamb sausage, ginger, garlic, & curry powder to satisfy my craving for stuffing.  It worked surprisingly well and amazed a lot of people at the potluck who never thought kale and chard could taste good!
It probably wouldn't hold up all by itself baked in the turkey, but I think if you combined those ingredients with with chunks of celery, apple and/or potato & maybe some walnuts for extra crunch, it could work.  If you wanted to you could add a mixture of regular potatos and sweet potatos and let your mom pick out the sweet potatos and you pick out the regular ones... so there was something for everyone.  Good luck and let us know what you decide on!
Posted by: Laura P, Monday, November 13, 2006, 11:39pm; Reply: 39
can you post exactly how you made your kale lamb mix that sounds divine on its own
Posted by: Brighid45, Monday, November 13, 2006, 11:59pm; Reply: 40
I second that Laura--santosha, that recipe sounds delicious! Please share :)
Posted by: 379 (Guest), Tuesday, November 14, 2006, 7:31pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from lkpetrolino
can you post exactly how you made your kale lamb mix that sounds divine on its own


Sure!  It's really easy.  

1 small red onion, finely chopped
1 tblsp garlic paste or minced garlic
1 tblsp ginger paste or minced ginger
1/2 teaspoon curry powder
1/2 teaspoon garam masala (optional, I think this has cinammon in it)
2 lamb sausages (or 1/2 lb ground lamb if you can't find sausages)
1 large bunch chard or kale, chopped(or combination of the two)
olive oil to coat pan
sea salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste

Add a generous coating of olive oil to a large frying pan.  On med-high heat sautee onions until they are translucent.  Add spices and stir thoroughly.  Add the lamb sausage, removing it from the casing and breaking into small pieces.  When lamb is cooked through add greens and sautee briefly, until greens wilt and are mixed in with the lamb and onion.  Salt and pepper to taste.  

Enjoy!



Posted by: lstreat, Tuesday, November 14, 2006, 8:56pm; Reply: 42
This sounds yummy  :P

http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=recipe&dbid=154
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 8:20pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from santosha
...and let us know what you decide on!

As of this writing, I'm leaning towards doing something with artichoke because it is beneficial for both me and my mom (yet we will already be getting artichoke in "Page 26", our spinach-artichoke casserole...so it will be an artichoke-intensive Thanksgiving if I go with an artichoke stuffing as well, however, I've already briefed my mom on this and she is enthusiastically for an arti-intensive T-Day.  She is all about artichoke).  I am thinking of doing the stuffing on the stovetop afterall, because veggie-based stuffings won't hold up for hours of cooking in the bird, me thinks.  I might combine the artichoke with some butternut squash, cranberries, butter, drippings from the turkey, onions, garlic, sage, etc., and see what comes of it.

That's my leaning at this juncture *lol*.
:D

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 8:22pm; Reply: 44
P.S.  And, if I do it and it turns out, you can best believe I shall post the recipe!  Any grain-free delish replacement for a traditionally grain-based thaaang needs to be posted early and often!
Posted by: Laura P, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 8:29pm; Reply: 45
artichoke is good for detox so it will help detox you both in case you eat something you should not
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 8:29pm; Reply: 46
lstreat,
thanks for fishing out that turkey recipe! )



Edna, have you ever seen Jerusalem artichokes?
those seem to be very 'potato like' without the heavy starch.........
Posted by: Laura P, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 8:30pm; Reply: 47
actually I have done veggie based stuffing in a turkey before works well and tast fabulous.
Posted by: Olerica, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 11:32pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from Edna


Well, I'm off to research whether wild rice is a grain or a grass or what the flip it is.  I knew at one point and now I've forgotten.  Darn that Dr. Rod and his short-wave diathermy to the head.  I've never been the same since...


Please cook the wild rice first BEFORE stuffing as it's really, really good once it's opened up.  

PM me if you need a shipment.  It's a staple here in Minnesota.
Posted by: 379 (Guest), Friday, November 17, 2006, 6:40pm; Reply: 49
Quoted from Edna

As of this writing, I'm leaning towards doing something with artichoke because it is beneficial for both me and my mom (yet we will already be getting artichoke in "Page 26", our spinach-artichoke casserole...so it will be an artichoke-intensive Thanksgiving if I go with an artichoke stuffing as well, however, I've already briefed my mom on this and she is enthusiastically for an arti-intensive T-Day.  She is all about artichoke).  I am thinking of doing the stuffing on the stovetop afterall, because veggie-based stuffings won't hold up for hours of cooking in the bird, me thinks.  I might combine the artichoke with some butternut squash, cranberries, butter, drippings from the turkey, onions, garlic, sage, etc., and see what comes of it.

That's my leaning at this juncture *lol*.
:D



Atichoke is a great idea for a stuffing base!!! Yummy, I can't wait to hear how it turns out & hopefully get your recipe.  :)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, November 17, 2006, 8:09pm; Reply: 50
Yeah, I'm leaning way artichokey, but Olerica thanks so much for the tip to cook wild rice before stuffing the bird with it, as that is one thing (of many) I was wondering about.  Thanks!

btw, got the turkey last night (frozen...I waited too long to place an order for a fresh, free-range one from the HFS, so I got a frozen one at the regular supermarket).  I refuse to buy a turkey shot through with phosphate solution.  For the life of me, I don't know why they do this.  Why ruin a perfectly beautiful turkey?  So, I bought a frozen kosher turkey, as they have no solution added.  I have purchased them in the past and they've been delish.  Mine is an 11.03 pounder.  My mom and I will have a lot of gorgeous leftovers in Gladware!  Even after the four pets gets their feasts!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, November 20, 2006, 12:53pm; Reply: 51
Update:  the stuffing ingredients have been purchased (except for some broth, which I forgot and will have to get on the one more run I need to make manana or, God forbid, Wednesday).  If it turns out well, I shall post the exact recipe (or, as exact as I ever get with recipes, anyway) afterwards, but the preliminary ingredients are:

1 organic butternut squash
1 organic acorn squash
2 cans of artichoke hearts (I know, I know, I should have made fresh)
organic fresh cranberries
organic poultry seasoning (main ingredient:  sage)
organic butter
3 organic purple onions
1 organic head of garlic
About a cup of organic chicken, turkey or vegetable broth (still need to get--I know, I know, I should make that from scratch, too)
Sea salt to taste (the world ain't right without salt added)

I'm thinking, how bad could this be?  I shall cook the squashes "al dente" ahead so that I can peel the thick outside skin off and mash them up.  Everything will get mixed together and cooked in the bird, if room.  If not enough room, there will also be an extra casserole dish of stuffing.

This will be a fun experiment in grain-free living!  Hopefully, it will be delicious and Recipebase-worthy!
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Monday, November 20, 2006, 2:49pm; Reply: 52
Quoted from lola
ezequiel bread, celery and almonds with ghee very tasty.....


I'm going to use Ezekiel bread as the base for my dressing this  year.  It would just HAVE to be good!!   Thanks, Lola for the tip. I love to stuff that turkey with dressing!!


By the way, I also find Rachel Ray's current TV program way too hyper!   I am gathering most of my recipes from the TypeBase page, recipe section.  I have quite a good collection already.  (dance)
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 5:53am; Reply: 53
report on your creation Edna!
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 6:08am; Reply: 54
ok made a sample stuffing tonight, haven't tasted yet but it smells pretty darn good

ground dark meat turkey
celery
onion
garlic

browned in a pan
remove add

more celery
onion
garlic
chopped up apple
cranberries
turnips
carrots
fennel
spinach

sautee untill softish
add turkey mix

cook on low for a few minutes
season with seasalt
coriander, basil, poultry seasonings a touch of ginger, cardamon

i'll let you know
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 4:54pm; Reply: 55
I copied and saved that one, Laura.  It sounds great.  What about some walnuts in it??
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 5:45pm; Reply: 56
yes I think that would be good as well.  I had some this morning with eggs and it was delightful
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, November 21, 2006, 11:20pm; Reply: 57
thanks for posting your stuffing invention Laura!
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, November 22, 2006, 4:50pm; Reply: 58
A combo of Black and Brown Rice works if you can't get Wild Rice.
Also a good candidate for Millet and Barley.

Chestnuts {roasted or boiled NOT the canned sweetened} are also good, not for Os though...

Instead of meat stock try a slightly thick mucilage of soaked Shiitake.

Our family 'secret' to Wild Rice Stuffing is some finely sliced Celery.


For the Turkey:
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