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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  Diabetes, fructose, and Agave nectar?
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, November 10, 2006, 5:18am
My basic question is whether agave nectar is really ok for diabetics to use (in moderation of course)

Some bottles of agave nectar claim to be safe for diabetics, hence my question arose.  They all claim it has a low glycemic index.  The diabetes book only recommends veggie glycerine, with no mention of agave.  

However, from my limited wiki-reading, it looks like fructose is one of the worst types of sugar for causing glycation http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Glycation and according to the bottle, agave is high in fructose.

I'm trying to stick to veg. glycerine, but sometimes I want something a little bit sweet in my green tea and glycerine doesn't give good results.  
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Friday, November 10, 2006, 8:34pm; Reply: 1
hi Melissa :D

what's about stevia and your btype??)
Posted by: Don, Friday, November 10, 2006, 11:50pm; Reply: 2
Stevia is a type O non-secretor avoid.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Saturday, November 11, 2006, 12:05am; Reply: 3
Glycerine tastes better than stevia anyway, IMO.  ;D
Posted by: mikeo, Monday, November 13, 2006, 1:41pm; Reply: 4
Melissa...may I suggest proberry liquid..it's more of a sour sweet taste but very satisfying...a teaspoon does the trick for me
Posted by: Jane, Monday, November 13, 2006, 6:10pm; Reply: 5
I noticed that it says right on the agave syrup bottle that it's OK for diabetics.  I like the taste....a little like brown sugar or turbinado or maybe even maple syrup.
Jane
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 2:32pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Melissa_J
However, from my limited wiki-reading, it looks like fructose is one of the worst types of sugar for causing glycation http://www.dadamo.com/wiki/wiki.pl/Glycation and according to the bottle, agave is high in fructose.


Seems like this would make it an avoid for more than half of us, so now, wondering why it was used in the UniBars  ??)        Thanks for bringing this up Melissa.  :)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 2:38pm; Reply: 7
fructose extracted from corn is the culprit, not agave.
Posted by: Kristin, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 3:26pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from lola
fructose extracted from corn is the culprit, not agave.


Yes... the fructose in agave syrup is naturally occuring, and agave syrup is harvested similar to maple syrup.


http://www.madhavahoney.com/agave.htm

Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 5:37pm; Reply: 9
Every piece of fruit contains fructose.  Not to worry.

Watch out for the evil CORN!!!!
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 7:10pm; Reply: 10
Welllllllllllllllll, now I feel soooo much better now. Thanks girls!!! ;D
Posted by: northernstars, Wednesday, November 15, 2006, 9:34pm; Reply: 11
What about xylitol?  It is a nautrally sweet component derived originally from birch trees and, now, also berry stems and cron cobs.  Tastes wonderful.  Does not raise blood sugar.  Does not taste in any way like spenda.  Has been used since, I believe, the first world war in Europe.  
Posted by: Don, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 4:16pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from lola
fructose extracted from corn is the culprit, not agave.

I disagree. I think that any source of fructose will have the same problem of producing glycation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose Make sure to read the Health Effects section at the bottom of the page.

Posted by: Melissa_J, Thursday, November 16, 2006, 7:04pm; Reply: 13
I have figured out a couple ways to make glycerine work for me, by way of update.

When I put it straight into hot tea, I don't like it, the flavor tends to disappear, so I let the tea cool down first.  I've also added a few whole cloves to my glycerine bottle, to give it some flavor, because it has no flavor whatsoever, just sweet, and I was expecting some flavor like honey and agave have.  

I think that for diabetics, all fructose can cause problems, and should be limited.  I'd rather have what sugar I can have in the form of beneficial blueberries than in the form of sweetener for tea, myself.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 17, 2006, 12:25am; Reply: 14
high fructose corn syrup does not come close to agave nectar!)
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, November 17, 2006, 1:34am; Reply: 15
Corn syrup is a double whammy, because the corn lectin binds to insulin receptors, causing insulin resistance, then the fructose can wreak glycating havoc.

But, if you already have diabetes or prediabetes (or other blood sugar problems), you have to be careful how much of any type of sugar you eat... for normal people following BTD then you can enjoy the compliant non-corny fructose sources without problem.

Fruit is, of course, a great source of antioxidants (some fruits more than others), which help in the diabetes scenario, so in the right amounts at the right time, it's great.
Posted by: resting, Saturday, November 18, 2006, 1:22pm; Reply: 16
hi Melissa,

found out about this today - http://www.goodcausewellness.com/servlet/StoreFront - it may not only help you but the granola may be a great compliant snack for O-nonnies.  John of pipnjohn has posted about chia seeds ....

am hoping to blend chia seed with MSM............ may be very beneficial for 'older' folk

John
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