Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Purple Kohlrabi
Posted by: Don, Wednesday, November 8, 2006, 11:20pm
When shopping today the store where I normally can get organic kohlrabi had organic purple kohlrabi instead, for the first time. I bought two bunches for a total of 6. Does anyone have any experience with purple kohlrabi? Do the greens or the bulbs taste any differently? I wonder if the nutritional or phytonutrient profile is any different?

I am cooking the greens right now so I guess I will find out this evening if I can detect any difference in the taste of them. I will probably try one of the bulbs tomorrow finely chopped up in a salad.

Here is another picture of purple kohlrabi.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Wednesday, November 8, 2006, 11:32pm; Reply: 1
I've never had this (purple/non purple).  Are just the leaves beneficial? Is the root edible, and if so what does it taste like?

Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, November 8, 2006, 11:47pm; Reply: 2
they look very inviting!!!
enjoy!
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 12:18am; Reply: 3
Quoted from KimonoKat
Are just the leaves beneficial? Is the root edible, and if so what does it taste like?

The leaves and the globe are edible...  I've never tasted the Kohlrabi root, but the root is about the diameter of a pencil and it is very tough.

The kohlrabi globe tastes similar to the peeled stem of broccoli, as I recall.
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 12:23am; Reply: 4
Quoted from ironwood55
When shopping today the store where I normally can get organic kohlrabi had organic purple kohlrabi instead, for the first time. I bought two bunches for a total of 6. Does anyone have any experience with purple kohlrabi? Do the greens or the bulbs taste any differently? I wonder if the nutritional or phytonutrient profile is any different?


I've only ever seen and used purple kohlrabi. I never considered that it came any other way. Huh!

I eat the leaves, the stems, and the bulbs raw when I make my kohlrabi slaw. Never tried either of them cooked, though.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 1:10am; Reply: 5
I'm confused.  I thought that big bulb thing on the bottom was the root.  No? ??)
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 1:17am; Reply: 6
I call that the root, too. I was responding to ABJoe; in what I thought he called the root, was probably really called the stem.

At any rate, I eat the whole darn lot, raw, when I make my kohlrabi slaw, and it all tastes divine to me.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 1:34am; Reply: 7
Quoted from KimonoKat
I thought that big bulb thing on the bottom was the root.  No?


The bulb grows above ground...  The root is small, like a pencil from the bottom center of the globe...  In the pictures MoDon linked, the stem and root has bee cut off.  Look at the picture from the bottom link and you can see that the bottom of the globe has been cut off flat...

We grew green kohlrabi(s) when I was growing up...  The chickens and pigs didn't even eat the stem and root below the bulb...
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 1:45am; Reply: 8
Ahhhhh, now I understand. I usually cut the root off. Never thought of eating it.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 2:08am; Reply: 9
I believe the first time I ever saw and purchased kohlrabi at my co-op, it was the purple variety and the bulbs were only available.  I never knew that kohlrabi also comes in a light green variety.  Much later on, when I was at Whole Foods or at a co-op, I saw the green variety and I also saw the whole plant--greens and bulbs attached.  

Now after tasting the two varieties both raw in salads and cooked in water), I can attest that the green variety is much subtler in taste and a little sweeter.  The purple variety is a colorful visual addition to salads with its purple and white contrast, while cooking dissipates the purple color once it is cooked.  The recipes for 'kohlrabi slaw' in which bloggers, Paul and Suzanne, have shared with us would be a nice recipe using the green variety, because the green variety probably has a taste more in line with green cabbage.  Th purple variety tastes a little stronger, albeit it's not a strong, pungent taste like turnips.  

One can cook the kohlrabi greens as they would for any greens lightly sauteed in olive oil or water until slightly wilted.  When I buy vegetables, I do not like to waste any portion of it, so I would find a way to use the greens--either raw or cooked.  In this case, I think cooked kohlrabi greens would taste better cooked than raw.  If I remember correctly, the greens looked more like greens made for cooking; the greens would be a nice new vegetable to add to one's vegetable repetoire.

Please let us know how you used the kohlrabi.

Alia
Posted by: Don, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 3:04am; Reply: 10
I cook kohlrabi greens like I do collard greens which would be longer at a fairly low heat. I think they taste and have a texture a lot like collard greens.
Posted by: Schluggell, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 9:24am; Reply: 11
Once you peel the Kohlrabi stem the purple and green are essentially the same.

I suppose the leaves maybe subtly different healthwise - but I presume the purple Kohlrabi leaves lose most of their colour when cooked?

There is also a white one and the large 'Gigante' variety {I've never tried this one}.
I could also believe that there could potentially be a variegated variety as well.
Posted by: Don, Thursday, November 9, 2006, 9:59pm; Reply: 12
I had some of the cooked kohlrabi greens for breakfast this morning. It wasn't a fair taste test because I messed up cooking them last night by letting the pot run dry so some of them tasted a little burned.  ::) They were still good to eat and I enjoyed them. I also didn't cook them as long because of what happened so that may explain why the texture was different, a little firmer.

At lunch I forgot I had the kohlrabi when I was making my salad so I will have to wait until tomorrow to taste the bulb.
Print page generated: Wednesday, November 26, 2014, 8:08am