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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Gluten Free Flour
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Monday, October 23, 2006, 8:50pm
I have a question  regarding gluten free flours.  Again, this is in  regard to my husband who is Type O.  He began eating the Ezekiel Bread and found that he is beginning to lose some weight and also his blood sugar levels are normalizing - moreso than they have ever been.  We are excited about seeing those glucose numbers coming down into the normal range.  But, I'm a bit confused about the kinds of flour I can use to make my own baked goods for him.  I have soy flour which states it is gluten free, but it does better if combined with other types of flour for most baked goods.  So, what is the verdict on Spelt Flour?  The box did not say one way or the other about gluten free.  I bought it in a health food store and asked the sales clerk specifically if it is gluten free.  She assured me that it is.  Are the sprouted grains found in Ezekiel Bread the only other grains that are truly gluten free or is this Spelt Flour also a good thing to  use?   What about Millet?  Will it work well with Soy Flour in baked goods?   I also have milled flax seed which I have added to muffins.  The box clearly states that it is gluten free.  I'm still confused about the Spelt Flour.   ??)
Posted by: Isannah, Monday, October 23, 2006, 9:15pm; Reply: 1
I do not think spelt flour is gluten free. My O type husband use's it once in a while with no ill effects.
Posted by: Don, Monday, October 23, 2006, 9:38pm; Reply: 2
Is your husband gluten intolerant or celiac? Because if he is he shouldn't eat Ezekiel bread because it does have gluten. If he isn't gluten intolerant or celiac, then why are you worrying about only feeding him gluten free grain products? If he isn't gluten intolerant or celiac, then just follow the BTD food values and grain/starch frequency guidelines. Remember type Os do better with less or no grain versus more.

Spelt has gluten.
Millet does not have gluten.
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Monday, October 23, 2006, 9:43pm; Reply: 3
Hi Diann,
spelt and Kamut are good only for non celiac  or gluten intolerant persons,
soy flour work well with sweet rice flour (the thinner rice flour from Far East) and you can try also with buckwheat flour which is gluten free.
However many Os need little or no grains to loose easily and steadily an overweight.
Best regards Maria Giovanna
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Monday, October 23, 2006, 10:37pm; Reply: 4
No, he does not have celiac disease, but quoting from Dr. D's book for Type O Diet  The Weight Loss Factor:

"The leading factor in weight gain for Type Os is the gluten found in wheat germ and whole wheat products.  It acts on your metabolism to create the exact opposite of the state of ketosis.  Instead of keeping you lean and in a high-energy state, the gluten lectins inhibit your insulin metabolsim, interfering with the efficient use of calories for energy."

I guess the best approach is for him is to cut way back on breads of all kinds.  I think he is like a kid in the candy store after coming off the low carb high protein diet he was on before.  Of course, he still needs to go more for lean high protein meats and watch his intake of grains.  Just wondering what I can use to bake up some of those goodies he loves so much and still keep him healthy.  Healthy and happy is best!  Thanks for all the tips on the various flours. I will experiement with some to see which blends of flours work best while still trying to be gluten free.  No small task.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, October 23, 2006, 11:53pm; Reply: 5
use the grains which are compliant for his blood type........those will fit the bill! )
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 3:23am; Reply: 6
He doesn't need to be totally gluten free. It is wheat that is full of the damaging WGA (wheat germ agglutinin) lectin. Just mainly avoid wheat.

Use kamut or spelt for baking treats for him. They both have gluten and are neutral, but are fine for type O secretors.
Posted by: italybound, Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 12:46pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from lola
use the grains which are compliant for his blood type........those will fit the bill! )


you will have to experiment (or maybe a 'sperienced  ;) bread maker will come on and help out)  with mixing the flours together. You must have some gluten if you want a raised bread. good luck. :-)
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 1:17pm; Reply: 8
Thanks for all the help.  I think it is much simpler than I thought it would be.  By sticking to the grains on his allowed foods, it should be just fine.
Posted by: italybound, Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 1:19pm; Reply: 9
hey Diann, let us know what you make (flours or combined flours) and how it turns out ok? :-)  you guys are doing so great!!
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 1:55pm; Reply: 10
Will do!   I love to get in the kitchen and 'play' anyway . . .  
Posted by: Elizabeth, Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 2:56pm; Reply: 11
Millet and rice makes a great bread (unfortunately I bought it ready made from a specialty bakery in FL, and have never worked it out).  My O family just uses spelt, and tries to use it sparingly.  Spelt makes fabulous scones and pie crust.  Our main treat is apple pie--I keep some frozen crusts in the freezer, and often make only top crust pies (fruit or meat or chicken).  But it is hard not to eat the entire pie.  
Posted by: Diann (Guest), Tuesday, October 24, 2006, 6:53pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Elizabeth
Millet and rice makes a great bread (unfortunately I bought it ready made from a specialty bakery in FL, and have never worked it out).  My O family just uses spelt, and tries to use it sparingly.  Spelt makes fabulous scones and pie crust.  Our main treat is apple pie--I keep some frozen crusts in the freezer, and often make only top crust pies (fruit or meat or chicken).  But it is hard not to eat the entire pie.  


Sounds good, Elizabeth.  I haven't tried the Millet yet.  I've done a little baking with spelt flour blended with soy flour and it turned out dense and moist.  I added chopped apples and pecans into the mix and it was quite tasty.  Next time I shop, I'll pick up some millet and give that one a try. Thanks!
Posted by: justdealing (Guest), Wednesday, October 25, 2006, 12:43am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Diann
Will do!   I love to get in the kitchen and 'play' anyway . . .  


Since you like to *play* in your kitchen, Diann----I translate that as, not afraid to re-work recipes!---you may want to check out recipes at celiac disease websites.  Not that they would necessarily be compliant for you or DH, but you could tweak them for BTD factors. Those sites are excellent sources of information about gluten-free foods in general. Bob's Red Mill (www.bobsredmill.com) has come out with lots of gluten-free products in recent years, and their product information may be able to direct you toward flour combinations that work well together.  Again, you'd have to adjust for BTD compliancy.  Another company with gluten-free combinations is Ener-G (www.ener-g.com), again not directed toward BTD guidelines, but perhaps ideas for you to consider.

People who're gluten-intolerant, or who just want to avoid gluten, are making quite an impact on product availability and labeling.  It's amazing how pervasive gluten is.  This week I'm working at a health food store and noticed a vegetarian glucosamine supplement special-ordered for a customer.  I looked at the ingredient list and saw nothing obviously suspicious for anyone who might want to avoid gluten.  But below the list, there it was: this product contains wheat/gluten....
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 25, 2006, 12:48am; Reply: 14
corn and potato is what I ve found in gluten free substitutes, unfortunately.

you need to read the fine print! )
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