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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Beneficial dislikes?
Posted by: Don, Friday, September 15, 2006, 12:45pm
Some comments in other threads made me think about this question. What beneficial foods for your type do you not like the taste of?


Turnips: I don't care for the taste of cooked turnips by themselves. If they are cooked with other things they sometimes are OK because for some reason the taste gets much milder.

Black Walnuts: Once again I don't enjoy them by themselves, but sometimes they are OK, or even good, when cooked/baked in something.

Carob: I really haven't found a great way to enjoy carob, but I haven't really experimented with it very much.

Turmeric/Curry: They are one of the few things I haven't really tried cooking with. I occasionally take turmeric as a supplement.


I find that I really like most of the my type O secretor beneficial foods. I enjoy my BTD foods.
Posted by: lstreat, Friday, September 15, 2006, 1:24pm; Reply: 1
Good question MoDon. Has a nonnie there isn't too much on my bene list. But the foods I can do without are Kohlrabi, Okra and Turnips all in the veggie category. Although Kefir is not on my bene but neutral, I did try it before I found out I was a nonnie and I couldn't drink it. To me it tasted like sour milk and as I had never had it before I wasn't sure if that is what it was suppose to be like. So in the trash it went and I have never touched the stuff again.  ;)

Laura
Posted by: Debra+, Friday, September 15, 2006, 1:46pm; Reply: 2
About the only thing I don't care for in the beneficials is Turmeric.  Not on its own anyhow (on foods, of course).   I do love curry though. :D

Debra :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, September 15, 2006, 2:19pm; Reply: 3
Several things- but mainly fish things:
croaker, pickerel, sardine, mackerel,  sturgeon  
In the meatdepartment I wont say that I dislike, mutton, goat, lamb, rabbit or venison - but they are no my favorites !
Weird as I am I kind of like all veggies- but papaya is just too weird- smells like vomit.
Posted by: koolaid, Friday, September 15, 2006, 4:50pm; Reply: 4
I've noticed that I've developed a taste for a lot of the beneficials (like walnuts, pumpkin seeds, beneficial oils, and turnips) after eliminating a lot of the avoids. It's like I'm re-educating my taste buds! 8)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, September 15, 2006, 5:00pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from lstreat
Although Kefir is not on my bene but neutral, I did try it before I found out I was a nonnie and I couldn't drink it. To me it tasted like sour milk


Off the top of my head I cannot think of A nonnie beneficial foods that I dislike. I am more enthusiatic about some than others. Some I do not eat because I find that they create problems fo me.

On the subject of Kefir. Even eating a tablespoon or so of it mixed in other products gives me a headache. I can get away with eating yogurt.
Posted by: Ben_Lamers (Guest), Saturday, September 16, 2006, 12:10am; Reply: 6
figs..gross
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 3:56am; Reply: 7
I don't care for Soy products (tofu or roasted soybeans) and can't stand the taste of coffee...  I tried to drink some when I worked in restaurants during college, but couldn't get it down.
Posted by: girly, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:22am; Reply: 8
ABJoe good thing you don't like coffee...IT'S A BIG AVOID for us AB's!!!! ( changed in LRFYT) Trust me I'm trying to get off of it.

Personally I cannot stand the smell or taste of Lamb...smells mediciney to me, just gross. The thought of eating rabbit or goat revolts me but I think it's culture too. My Mom ate a lot of rabbit in Germany and my husband grew up on mutton. I'll stick to my Turkey thanks !
Posted by: Melissa_J, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:26am; Reply: 9
Liver...that's about it.  Though every now and then I like it, I just wish somebody else would cook it for me, handling it raw really turns me off from eating it.  Is elk beneficial?  That would be another one I can't stand.

I think I like all other beneficials, especially the convenient ones.
Posted by: Debra+, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:33am; Reply: 10
Quoted from girly
ABJoe good thing you don't like coffee...IT'S A BIG AVOID for us AB's!!!! ( changed in LRFYT) Trust me I'm trying to get off of it.

Personally I cannot stand the smell or taste of Lamb...smells mediciney to me, just gross. The thought of eating rabbit or goat revolts me but I think it's culture too. My Mom ate a lot of rabbit in Germany and my husband grew up on mutton. I'll stick to my Turkey thanks !


Isa-take note...;);) :K)

Debra :)

Posted by: girly, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:41am; Reply: 11
Yes Isa....lets have a challange. I bought instant coffee today to try to start to wean myself off. I can already feel the nausiating headache coming on but I'm determined.
Posted by: Lloyd, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 7:43am; Reply: 12
There are a few things I have not tried and one or two I'm not wild about (aduki beans would be one). Everything else is 'good to go'. On the other hand, there are several avoids that I have no problem avoiding!
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 3:54pm; Reply: 13
I really love the B beneficials, and enjoy eating them.

However....if there is any beneficial I don't like, it would have to be in the fish family.  I haven't even tried most of the beneficial fish on my list because it has taken me a long time just to come to enjoy the fish I do eat.  Now I adore wild salmon, and it's only a neutral!  I like canned sardines and I am leaning to cook cod in a way that I really like it.  
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:01pm; Reply: 14
I'm with Victoria and Henriette, I can't even try many of the beneficial fishes. The thought makes me want to gag.  I love salmon, cod, and whitefish.

I know okra is a beneficial, and I even have some canned okra in the pantry, just haven't mustered up the nerve to try them yet. I ask about fresh okra when I am in the stores, but haven't found any (I'm sure fresh is way better than canned).
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:14pm; Reply: 15
ooo..oooo it's 18.o'clock saturday evening,came back home, walked alone with my new baby-B ;)  guest for a week ;D and what do you think is gurgeling in my potty ??)....freshly made...yummiciolous c....é :D ...alone for the smell Iam going to die for :o ;)....:-/
D e b r a a a a a a :'( sooo sorry can't let it be for 100%  and yessss I took notice ;) ;D and dear girly I do feel your pain but sorry instantcafé is that castratet café??) ;):P ouch nöö thanx... and yup I know from what you are talking about headache and  cafécravings after a week of none of stimulantia, even greentea gets :P when on
cofeindetox ::) :B :X
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 4:17pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from outdoordrea
I'm with Victoria and Henriette, I can't even try many of the beneficial fishes. The thought makes me want to gag.  I love salmon, cod, and whitefish.

I know okra is a beneficial, and I even have some canned okra in the pantry, just haven't mustered up the nerve to try them yet. I ask about fresh okra when I am in the stores, but haven't found any (I'm sure fresh is way better than canned).


When I was growing up in the South, we ate fresh okra dipped in egg, shaken in a bag with seasoned flour and fried in oil.  Maybe you could adapt that to compiant products and try okra like that.  Even for a person who didn't eat grains, they could roll them in almond meal.  It really helps with the texture and the crunchy crust balances the questionable interior.   ;D
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 5:45pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from girly
ABJoe good thing you don't like coffee...IT'S A BIG AVOID for us AB's!!!! ( changed in LRFYT)


Thanks!  I guess I had never checked the Typebase for it since I can't stand it.

I haven't tried all of the compliant fish either, but every (beneficial) fish I've ever tried, I have liked.

Melissa's "handling liver" comment is justified.  I have learned that I need to "just do it" because I need a good liver & onions meal about every week or two and I need to cook it or find a restaurant that does, but I usually get into some avoids there.  Much better to do what I KNOW is good.

Posted by: Janet, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 8:02pm; Reply: 18
FISH....FISH....FISH and all fish!!!! yuck!!
Posted by: Lloyd, Saturday, September 16, 2006, 10:34pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Victoria


okra .....the questionable interior.  


The question is, why would you not like the best part?  :P

Posted by: Beouemom, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 12:15am; Reply: 20
Modon;  in reference to tumeric.   I wanted to say I was making a salad dressing the other day with walnut oil, garlic, almonds and lemon juice and decided to add some tumeric to it.  I also added salt and hot pepper. I am not sure what it did to the taste of the dressing but it made it a pretty yellow color.  That would be one way to get some tumeric to your diet.  I have also added it to my beef and onions as I was cooking it.  That did taste good!  
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 12:33am; Reply: 21
Ahh.... I see..... food is entirely texture dependant!

No wonder I don't eat yogurt. It's slimy!  ;) Heaven forbid I eat something super-slimy like flax seed!
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 12:38am; Reply: 22
There are some things that I really like that are slimy...and if that's they way that okra is, at least I'll know ahead of time. Chinese eggplant (although I don't eat it anymore :'() is slimy and I used to love that...especially when made with lots of garlic.
Posted by: marianne, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 12:44am; Reply: 23
I pretty sure that I like the way just about everything tastes.  And yes, Henrietta, I used to hold my breath while I ate papaya, but to me it tastes delicious...and each one is amazingly different tasting.

Even though I have learned to say, "I don't like coconut." or "I don't eat anchovies"...  It is not because of the way they taste!  

I do believe that the right recipe or method of preparation has a lot to do with making most foods taste good.  When I discovered that liver was ever so much better when it was NOT cooked until it resembled a dried-up leather shoe it made all the difference in the world.

I must admit here are some absolute won't eats, too, like blood.

The only things I can think of regretting having bathed my taste buds in were aloe vera juice and some hard liquors...but I'd be willing to give them another try prepared differently! lol
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 12:57am; Reply: 24
Quoted from outdoordrea
There are some things that I really like that are slimy...and if that's they way that okra is, at least I'll know ahead of time. Chinese eggplant (although I don't eat it anymore :'() is slimy and I used to love that...especially when made with lots of garlic.



To think, I only really learned to like eggplant in the last few years. Chinese eggplant is  :P . Have not had any in about a year..... it's neutral for me. Gonna have to work it into the rotation!

Thanks for the reminder! Once a month or something would be good!  :K)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 3:03am; Reply: 25
I believe we had a thread about okra once before. If you don't like it slimey the key is not to remove all of the stem, leave a little "cap" on the end. One recipe was to brush small, whole okra pods with olive oil and salt and pepper them. Then put them on skewers and over a barbeque grill for about 5 minutes a side. There was another thread on a gardening forum I am on. Give me a day or two and I'll dig it up.
Posted by: Vicki, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 3:58am; Reply: 26
I select the smaller okra (finger-sized) and wash them.  Next I steam them whole for 5 minutes.  Finally I trim both ends off each okra.  I sprinkle with a little salt and enjoy!

Carob - melt some ghee, stir in almond butter, add in some honey or molasses or whatever,  stir in carob powder.  This is good spread in celery sticks as well as eaten alone or spread on plain rice snaps.
Posted by: Drea, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 4:09am; Reply: 27
Quoted from marianne
Even though I have learned to say, "I don't like coconut." or "I don't eat anchovies"...  It is not because of the way they taste!

It's funny you should mention this because for YEARS I used to say "I don't like mayonnaise" when in fact I really love mayonnaise. It was mostly because of the fat content (back when I was eating low-fat). Unfortunately for me, lately I've rediscovered the deliciousness of mayonnaise sandwiches, only I am using non-compliant mayonnaise. I really gotta learn to make my own to taste like Best Foods. ::) :o :B :D
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 4:43am; Reply: 28
eggplant turns infrequent neutral or avoid in the healthseries books.........that made me sad.
Posted by: Serena (Guest), Sunday, September 17, 2006, 5:12am; Reply: 29
I love turmeric on chicken...

bennies I don't like? Where to begin? Fish- I don't eat any seafood yet. One day I'll really make an effort, now I only say I wish I could eat fish. HATE carob. Will NOT touch liver. Don't really care for turnip, dandelion, beet, or  mustard greens or chard. Only like Kale in little pieces in salad. I don't like any green vegetable cooked besides green peppers. Don't like lamb much, and I don't like raw onions... oh, and I don't eat any beans at all- bennie or otherwise...

I haven't tried okra or jerusalem artichokes- I think those are the only bennie veggies I haven't tried, but I still haven't tried many of the other neutral veggies...
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 6:41am; Reply: 30
Quoted from lola
eggplant turns infrequent neutral or avoid in the healthseries books.........that made me sad.


For Cardio, it's a 'Frequent Neutral'.

My notes on Fatigue and Aging don't mention eggplant! Did not concern me at the time I took them.......

Since I have no nightshade issues, I will partake from time to time.

No need to get alarmed. Arthitis is another issue.....the avoid monster!
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 6:48am; Reply: 31
Quoted from Serena

bennies I don't like? Where to begin? Fish- I don't eat any seafood yet. One day I'll really make an effort, now I only say I wish I could eat fish. HATE carob. Will NOT touch liver. Don't really care for turnip, dandelion, beet, or  mustard greens or chard. Only like Kale in little pieces in salad. I don't like any green vegetable cooked besides green peppers. Don't like lamb much, and I don't like raw onions... oh, and I don't eat any beans at all- bennie or otherwise...


PS - mustard greens are an 'O' avoid.........

At least you are easy to please.  (Insert freindly sarcasm smily here)

Tried a new 'mix' tonight. Dandelion greens with Julienned raw Turnip root, topped with a ginger/garlic dressing.  :P
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 7:26am; Reply: 32
Lol!!
you re right!
it s the menopause book I m looking at.........guess you don t have that problem!
enjoy your eggplant, whenever. )
Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 7:44am; Reply: 33
Quoted from lola
Lol!!
you're right!
it's the menopause book I m looking at.........guess you don't have that problem!
enjoy your eggplant, whenever. :)


;D

Sorry about the menopause thing, to whomever it affects.....
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, September 17, 2006, 4:22pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg


;D

Sorry about the menopause thing, to whomever it affects.....


It affects everyone who lives in the house!  LOL   ;D   :B
Posted by: Lloyd, Monday, September 18, 2006, 12:21am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Victoria


It affects everyone who lives in the house!  LOL   ;D   :B


True. Just one of many things. Nice laugh though!

Posted by: Serena (Guest), Monday, September 18, 2006, 4:18am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg

At least you are easy to please.  

I'm a woman, what did you expect? ;)
Posted by: Poly, Monday, September 18, 2006, 7:40am; Reply: 37
I love food in general, and am pretty omnivorous, but there are a few bennies I don't like or at least am a little unfamiliar with: heart, walnuts, endive, bananas, mango, guava, all kinds of sea-weed, and carbonated water. I've never tasted okra or adzukibeans that I know of, but I dislike all kinds of beans except green beans, so I can't imagine I like adzuki beans...

Quoted from outdoordrea

It's funny you should mention this because for YEARS I used to say "I don't like mayonnaise" when in fact I really love mayonnaise. It was mostly because of the fat content (back when I was eating low-fat)....


Heh, this is so funny! I have a very good friend from University, she's very slim and works hard to stay that way, BUT she LOVES mayonnaise. She use to say: "When women say they don't like mayonnaise, that's just a big fat lie! No one dislikes mayonnaise - they just say that to sound political correct...!!!" ::) ;D
HAH - I'll email her right away to let her know, she was right all along!!! ;) :D
Posted by: yaman, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 11:32am; Reply: 38
May I step in for making a request?

I know all of you have good will and don't erally want to offend anyone. But could we please settle for "dislike" or "don't like" or even "hate"? Instead of describing scenes that may be disturbing those who actually love that particular food.

Thank you for your kind understanding.

Cheers,
Yaman
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 3:27pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from ironwood55
What beneficial foods for your type do you not like the taste of?

That'd be okra.
Quoted from ironwood55
I find that I really like most of the my type O secretor beneficial foods. I enjoy my BTD foods.

Me, too.

Posted by: Melissa_J, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:09pm; Reply: 40
I love okra!  Of course my introduction to it was fried, and I've worked up to stewed with tomatoes, which are both pretty tasty, I like it in stews as well, but I'm not brave enough to eat it plain steamed or boiled...I'm afraid I'd stop liking it if I tried that.

I can't say that there's a vegetable I really dislike, I have other excuses when I don't eat enough veggies...simply lacking the time to cook them, usually.  I try to cook broccoli in bulk once a week so I at least have something green to eat when life gets crazy.
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:14pm; Reply: 41
I really like okra sauteed in ghee with chopped onion. served with some sea salt. I sometimes fix and enjoy it as sort of a after dinner dessert like treat.
Posted by: Melissa_J, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:15pm; Reply: 42
Don- do you slice it first, or saute the whole pods?

If only I could ever consider a vegetable a "dessert" ;D
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:25pm; Reply: 43
I cut the okra up in 1/4 to 1/2 inch pieces.

Don't you consider pumpkin pie as dessert?  ;D
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:47pm; Reply: 44
So I have a can of okra. Presumably it's already cooked. What suggestions do you 'okra loving folks' have for me on how to prepare it for eating? Remember, it's my first time and I really want to like it ;).
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 6:57pm; Reply: 45
Don,
You're an inspiration as one of the few true vegetable lovers!
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7:17pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from outdoordrea
So I have a can of okra. Presumably it's already cooked.

I would think you could still saute it in ghee. You could I also add the canned okra to things like soup or stew.

I make a pot of beneficial bean soup about once a month and usually add okra to it.

Posted by: Don, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7:21pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from Victoria
You're an inspiration as one of the few true vegetable lovers!

I think that onions are very sweet and when cooked and served with ghee and/or olive oil, both of with I really love, makes for a nice treat. The okra is just a beneficial bonus. ;)

Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7:36pm; Reply: 48
Last night, I steamed parsnips, carrots and red onions in a little water, and then stirred them in the skillet with ground lamb, just before taking off the heat.  Later, I drank the water from the vegetables.  It was as sweet as a glass of fruit juice.  Amazing!
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7:40pm; Reply: 49
Back to dislikes, I have had a real hard time liking greens . . collards, kale, etc.

I recently cooked a bunch of chopped collards a la Don, steaming them in a little water for about an hour and 15 minutes.  I drained them, mixed them with a little sea salt, olive oil and ghee, and OH!  I have to say, I really liked them!! Wonder of wonders.  It was that long cooking that made all the difference.
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7:47pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from Victoria
Back to dislikes, I have had a real hard time liking greens . . collards, kale, etc.

I recently cooked a bunch of chopped collards a la Don, steaming them in a little water for about an hour and 15 minutes.  I drained them, mixed them with a little sea salt, olive oil and ghee, and OH!  I have to say, I really liked them!! Wonder of wonders.  It was that long cooking that made all the difference.


I did the same thing *lol*! I cooked the whole bunch and tried it two ways: the first with a drizzle of olive oil, some ghee, and salt; the second way with olive oil, lemon juice, and wf tamari. The first version won by a mile, and what I discovered (if I didn't already know it) was that almost everything tastes better with ghee!!!! :D
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 5:06am; Reply: 51
I'm happy to say that while I don't think collards, plain, is going to work for me, mixed in with other foods, I'll take them. I made a batch last night and can't seem to eat the last of them, but will add them to some beans I'm planning on cooking tomorrow. And I may add the okra, too, for fun :).

BTW, I really like my salmon, cod, tuna, and whitefish! :D
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 5:11am; Reply: 52
The next time I make Collards, I'm going to chop them really fine, because the only thing I didn't like about this batch I made is that they ended up in big clumps.  I did some chopping with my fork.  I'm going to see how fine I can slice and chop them so that they're easier to eat.  Otherwise the experiment was a success:  good taste, good texture!
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 5:31am; Reply: 53
Quoted from Victoria
The next time I make Collards, I'm going to chop them really fine, because the only thing I didn't like about this batch I made is that they ended up in big clumps.  I did some chopping with my fork.  I'm going to see how fine I can slice and chop them so that they're easier to eat.  Otherwise the experiment was a success:  good taste, good texture!


If you lay the leaves on top of each other, you can then roll them up tightly. Slice from one end about 1/4-3/8 inch, repeat till done. If you like, then slice once the other direction ((perpendicular)) (still rolled and 'together'). This will produce a fantastic start to a fried or boiled preperation. If you are willing to go to a finer cut (1/8 or smaller) it will reduce cooking time needed. In fact, I use 1/8 inch and stir fry with onion to good result. Once you get used to it, it is fairly quick and easy to do.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 10:23pm; Reply: 54
I was just telling a friend I haven't much of a taste for SARDINES.  She's one of those people who LOVES 'em, as well as fish skin, as well as canned salmon with the bones, that sort of thing.

I've just bought skinless, boneless sardines in olive oil, at the market.  Any recommendations re: preparing them with minimum gag-reflex-stimulation?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 10:41pm; Reply: 55
how about rolled in wilted collars and smothered with compliant cheese and cream in the oven.....
very B type!! I m sure you wouldn t be able to taste those poor sardines that way! )
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 10:55pm; Reply: 56
OK, Lola.  I'm gonna take you up on it and get back to you.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 11:21pm; Reply: 57
Exj, how about shredding them with a fork, add eggs, tarragon or basil, diced red peppers and onions, salt and pepper of your choice, a little millet or barley flour, then frying them up as fish cakes. It works for canned mackerel any way.
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 11:30pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg


PS - mustard greens are an 'O' avoid.........

At least you are easy to please.  (Insert freindly sarcasm smily here)

Tried a new 'mix' tonight. Dandelion greens with Julienned raw Turnip root, topped with a ginger/garlic dressing.  :P


For secretor only.  Neutral for the nonnies.  ;)

Debra :)

Posted by: san j, Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 11:31pm; Reply: 59

Thanks to gulfcoastguy: This has  been on my mind ever since a similar recipe was posted by the Samos group, remember?  I'll give it that sort of try... Thanks much.  Whatta group.  Good to be back.  :K) :D
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, September 21, 2006, 12:02am; Reply: 60
Quoted from debra


For secretor only.  Neutral for the nonnies.  ;)

Debra :)



And still not a beneficial....  ;)  Talking about beneficial dislikes?  ;)

Point taken though.

Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, September 21, 2006, 3:10am; Reply: 61
Sorry Lloyd_O_secretor-guess I got side tracked. ;)

Debra :)
Posted by: Schluggell, Friday, September 22, 2006, 1:11pm; Reply: 62
Food is Medicine...
When does medicine ever taste good?

All my years of herbalism and gardening it astounds me every day when people complain of certain problems and the very next instant they tell me some food they don't like - They are 1 and the same.
Posted by: koahiatamadl, Saturday, September 23, 2006, 9:20am; Reply: 63
As long as I can remember I have hated spinach - the appearance of the stuff cooked - and we always had to eat it cooked when I was a child - was just revolting...

but on finding out that it is beneficial I have been forcing myself to eat it.  It looks okish folded into an omlett and it is really nice fresh actually...still prefer other greens if given a choice
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, September 23, 2006, 4:45pm; Reply: 64
Another way to eat spinach is wilted.  I find it much nicer than well-cooked.  It is such a tender green, it doesn't really need cooking.  If you cook meat in a pan, after it is done, remove the meat, pour off excess fats, and put in the clean spinach while the pan is still hot.  Stir around in the hot drippings until the leaves are wilted, and well saturated in the drippings and seasonings that were left in the pan.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 1:41am; Reply: 65
OK. I just posted a blog about my experiment, this afternoon, with SARDINES! Thanks to this Thread. :-/ ;)
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 2:37am; Reply: 66
Quoted from Victoria
Another way to eat spinach is wilted.  I find it much nicer than well-cooked.  It is such a tender green, it doesn't really need cooking.  If you cook meat in a pan, after it is done, remove the meat, pour off excess fats, and put in the clean spinach while the pan is still hot.  Stir around in the hot drippings until the leaves are wilted, and well saturated in the drippings and seasonings that were left in the pan.



Victoria-great this way with eggs (either sunny side up or over easy) also.   And...you don't have to get rid of the fat because it is ghee. ;)

Debra :)
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 3:51am; Reply: 67
Debra,
Do you cook the eggs first, or wilt the spinach and then drop the eggs into the greens?
Posted by: angel, Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 4:33am; Reply: 68
I love Smothered Liver and onions with a nice fat sweet potatoe. I have since I was a kid along with all those 'nasty' greens everyone else disliked(teaching my husband about green that are not cooked southern style and bathed in fatback, over spiced etc.. I am in heaven.

The only thing I really have trouble with is fresh fish. I can stand tuna and once upon a time fishsticks. Tuns is not a frequent item unless I am traveling along with safe canned meats.
Posted by: eh, Wednesday, September 27, 2006, 5:27am; Reply: 69
Quoted from Victoria


When I was growing up in the South, we ate fresh okra dipped in egg, shaken in a bag with seasoned flour and fried in oil.  Maybe you could adapt that to compiant products and try okra like that.  Even for a person who didn't eat grains, they could roll them in almond meal.  It really helps with the texture and the crunchy crust balances the questionable interior.   ;D



GOD, THAT SOUNDS GOOD!
eh
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 10:47pm; Reply: 70
I recently found that I like (and eat regularly now) three things that I never wanted to try, or tried and didn't like the first time: okra, collards, and swiss chard.

So now I'm eating more fish - which I don't really like except for fresh/frozen salmon and canned tuna. I bought some wild atlantic cod and cooked it up in the oven, but realize that I don't care for cod unless it's deep fried - as in fish and chips...

I cannot bring myself to even try sardines, even though they are a beneficial. Uck. I've read here that there are many folks who love sardines. I'm hoping to gear myself up to try them one day soon...just for some fish variation.
Posted by: 803 (Guest), Wednesday, March 14, 2007, 11:45pm; Reply: 71
The one beneficial I will probably never eat is onion. I mean, I can have a little bit of very well cooked finely chopped onions in stews or soups and such, but otherwise, I can't stand it. And if someone else is chopping onions, I'll get teary and puffy and red even if I'm in another room unless the doors are closed.

Everything else I am either learning to like, or realized I never hated them after all. These past two weeks I have eaten and enjoyed:
Fish (that was a tough one)
Spinach (both wilted and raw)
Lentils
Tofu
And I guess I'll add turnips, even though I never had them before. I loved them. Good potato replacement.
Posted by: accidental_chef, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 9:33am; Reply: 72
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
...but papaya is just too weird- smells like vomit.



;D ;D ;D!!!! too funny!

Can't stomach the taste of steamed/roasted/stir fried broccoli :X..however, it's nice as a soup.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 6:42pm; Reply: 73
Quoted from shape5
And I guess I'll add turnips, even though I never had them before. I loved them. Good potato replacement.



Mashed parsnips, mashed cauliflower, cooked pumpkin or various squashes, and taro root all make suitable potato replacements, as well.

With this lifestyle, one has the opportunity to experiment and venture to try new food items.

Alia
Posted by: Brighid45, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 7:20pm; Reply: 74
About the wilted spinach--I use kale or spinach and make it for breakfast. The recipe is really easy. Just heat up some ghee and olive oil (or just plain ghee if you like) in a heavy skillet. Add in the washed and dried kale or spinach. Because of the oxalic acid, I'll let the greens wilt and cook for a good 10-15 minutes. Adding in chopped onion and baby bella mushrooms is a nice touch here :) When the greens are thoroughly wilted and cooked, I add a little more ghee if necessary, then drop the eggs in and cover till soft set. I usually turn off the heat when the eggs are almost cooked. The residual heat will cook them through and also steam the contents so they come out of the skillet very easily.

As for beneficials I don't really like, right now it's turnips and parsnips. I'm slowly learning to eat them, but it's tough going. I've never been a fan of sweet root vegetables, but then I never liked greens or salad either, so there's hope :)
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Thursday, March 15, 2007, 9:54pm; Reply: 75
fish....I guess I'm not alone. I love all vegetables, luckily. don't care for papaya, would eat it in a salad.
Posted by: veggiegirl, Thursday, March 15, 2007, 11:53pm; Reply: 76
Snails & coffee !!!!!  Yuck!  :P
Posted by: vamainer (Guest), Friday, March 16, 2007, 12:42am; Reply: 77
Quoted from veggiegirl
Snails & coffee !!!!!  Yuck!  :P


Together? Yeah, yuck for sure!  (smarty)

The list of beneficial foods I DO like is much shorter than the list of ones I DON'T like! But the same could be said of neutrals and avoids...I just have an extremely limited array of foods that I like.  Unfortunately, most of the foods I like are BAAAAAD!

I guess the biggest problem for me right now is coming up with protein sources. I like chicken and turkey, but canned tuna is the only seafood I'll eat.  Good thing I like peanuts and walnuts!
Posted by: Lola, Friday, March 16, 2007, 1:15am; Reply: 78
how about compliant legumes and grains?
here are some complete protein combos, right for your type
Legumes + seeds
Legumes + nuts
Legumes + dairy
Grains + legumes
Grains + dairy
the exception is soy protein which is a complete plant protein.
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:20am; Reply: 79
I like coffee, but I don't think I'll ever get up the nerve to try snails. I'll probably try sardines before I try snails, although both sound yuckie.
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:21am; Reply: 80
Quoted from lola
how about compliant legumes and grains?
here are some complete protein combos, right for your type
Legumes + seeds
Legumes + nuts
Legumes + dairy
Grains + legumes
Grains + dairy
the exception is soy protein which is a complete plant protein.


Lola, I've also heard that quinoa is a complete protein. Can you confirm this?
Posted by: Poly, Friday, March 16, 2007, 7:37am; Reply: 81
Quoted from outdoordrea
I like coffee, but I don't think I'll ever get up the nerve to try snails. I'll probably try sardines before I try snails, although both sound yuckie.


IMO, snails are like eating an eraser - all rubbery and strange... :P No real taste, if it wasn't for the garlic and herbs they're smeared with. NOT my favourite food. ;)
Tried it a few times in Paris and at a friend's home, where they LOVED snails.

Guess, it's an acquired taste just like oysters and sushi and blue cheese and olives AND coffee. You don't nessecarily like it the first time you try it, but learn to love it and sometimes even get addicted to it.
My SIL is addicted to sushi - I can't for the life of me find anything interesting in it. I find it blah at best... ::)

Sardines... :o Eeeeeeee...!!! *runs off* Luckily it's only a neutral for me - whew!

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Friday, March 16, 2007, 8:00am; Reply: 82
Sushi I agree is rather  :-/ I like the ones that are really not sushi with avocado and smokes salmon.
I´m getting better at liking some of my beneficials.
I actually had some papaya last month that was ok
- It was marinated in limejuice- and DID not smell like vomit .

Untill now I have only been a smoked, gravad or marinated salmon person
- but 3 weeks ago I had cold fresh poached salmon- mixed with sour cream, chives and lemonpeel and it was very tasty. So maybe it is just hot salmon that I dislike. :-/

I think it is crucial to test your tastebuds- like you do with kids
- it takes several test to learn to care for several foods for a baby
- problem is that we either stop testing it on the kid or forcefeed the poor child >:(
Posted by: Poly, Friday, March 16, 2007, 8:09am; Reply: 83
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
I think it is crucial to test your tastebuds- like you do with kids
- it takes several test to learn to care for several foods for a baby
- problem is that we eaither stop testing iton the kid or forcefeed the poor child >:(


SO true! :)
Posted by: Ronagon (Guest), Friday, March 16, 2007, 9:06am; Reply: 84
I don't like eating the bamboo slivers and the bits of broken glass.  Those are no fun.  

Also, the stepping on a garden rake five times a day is something I could do without.

Oh.  Wait.  Those aren't beneficials.  They're not even on the diet.  What's going on???
Posted by: veggiegirl, Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:18pm; Reply: 85
Quoted from vamainer


Together? Yeah, yuck for sure!  (smarty)

The list of beneficial foods I DO like is much shorter than the list of ones I DON'T like! But the same could be said of neutrals and avoids...I just have an extremely limited array of foods that I like.  Unfortunately, most of the foods I like are BAAAAAD!

I guess the biggest problem for me right now is coming up with protein sources. I like chicken and turkey, but canned tuna is the only seafood I'll eat.  Good thing I like peanuts and walnuts!


Doesn't matter - their "yucky" together or separately!!  :P :P :P :P

As far as protein sources, I eat some tuna, but mostly salmon or cod since they're bennies.  Also, have you tried tofu?  It's not bad depending on what you cook with it.  I recently tried tempeh and I must admit I didn't really care for it much.  It's a strong taste.  Perhaps another thing to add to my "yuck" list!  ;D
Posted by: vamainer (Guest), Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:30pm; Reply: 86
Quoted from veggiegirl

Also, have you tried tofu?  It's not bad depending on what you cook with it.  I recently tried tempeh and I must admit I didn't really care for it much.  It's a strong taste.  Perhaps another thing to add to my "yuck" list!  ;D


No, I haven't tried it yet.  I'll have to check the recipes and see if I can find a way to cook it.  Got any suggestions?  I've got some rice pasta I haven't tried yet, not sure if I'm ready for soy yet ;)
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 16, 2007, 4:41pm; Reply: 87
Here's a great product if you can find it at your hfs: Nutrition Kitchen Soybean pasta. It cooks up and tastes just like regular spaghetti, and the only ingredients are soybeans. Very high in protein and grain free.  Yum. A great way to get your soy without eating tofu - although I am a great fan of tofu.
Posted by: Lola, Friday, March 16, 2007, 7:16pm; Reply: 88
stepping on a garden rake?
bare foot?
hope not!!!! lol
Posted by: vamainer (Guest), Friday, March 16, 2007, 8:34pm; Reply: 89
Quoted from outdoordrea
Here's a great product if you can find it at your hfs: [url=http://www.nutrikitchen.com/]


Thanks, I need to find the health food store in Roanoke, I believe it's a co-op, I've never been there. I've checked out GNC and Nature's Outlet, which both have locations that aren't quite so close to downtown, and are more convenient to get to, but I wasn't impressed with either. Guess it's time to go to Mapquest and get directions!

Posted by: veggiegirl, Friday, March 16, 2007, 9:27pm; Reply: 90
Quoted from vamainer


No, I haven't tried it yet.  I'll have to check the recipes and see if I can find a way to cook it.  Got any suggestions?  I've got some rice pasta I haven't tried yet, not sure if I'm ready for soy yet ;)


I usually have it in stirfry two ways:  cut tofu into small chunks & saute in with veggies, onions, fresh garlic and some soy sauce or I sometimes coat it with egg & corn starch and saute in olive oil, then add the veggies & other ingredients.

Also, it's very good in rice, veggies & teryaki sauce.
Posted by: Alia Vo, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 12:34am; Reply: 91
Quoted from vamainer


No, I haven't tried it yet.  I'll have to check the recipes and see if I can find a way to cook it.  Got any suggestions?  I've got some rice pasta I haven't tried yet, not sure if I'm ready for soy yet ;)


A variety of tofu and soy-based recipes are available in CR4YT and in the Recipe Index:
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=ED005
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipelister4.cgi?a


Alia
Posted by: Ronagon (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 12:59am; Reply: 92
Lola,

Yes, it's very painful.  

Posted by: vamainer (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 1:15am; Reply: 93
Quoted from Alia_Vo


A variety of tofu and soy-based recipes are available in CR4YT and in the Recipe Index:
http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=ED005
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipelister4.cgi?a


Alia


I just found one called Outrageous Sauteed Tofu, I think I'll try it next week :)

I keep reading how people's tastes have changed after they've been doing the BTD for awhile, learning to love things they never thought they'd eat. I sure hope it works that way for me!

Posted by: Drea, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 5:39am; Reply: 94
I bought a can of sardines in water at the store today. I don't know when I'll try them, but if I don't like them, perhaps the cats will. I figured I'd have a better chance of trying them if I actually bought them first!
Posted by: 803 (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:30pm; Reply: 95
I should have added to my post that that's for the beneficials I like. Or recognize. I don't actually know what tempeh is, or whether it's even available here.
Posted by: OSuzanna, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:46pm; Reply: 96
vamainer, pre-BTD I used to always get bellyaches from onions. I began to nibble red onions when I went BTD, and began to eat them more & more, especially with beef and greens. Now I can revel in something I love, so hot & sweet at the same time, and not get a tummy-ache. And they're good for me  ;D Avoids I used to like now give me pains. Oh, well, they are avoids, after all, as they remind me so efficiently! :B
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:48pm; Reply: 97
Quoted from shape5
I don't actually know what tempeh is, or whether it's even available here.


Tempeh is a fermented soy product, usually found in the same section of the grocery store as tofu. It's very good for As.
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:52pm; Reply: 98
Quoted from Victoria
Last night, I steamed parsnips, carrots and red onions in a little water, and then stirred them in the skillet with ground lamb, just before taking off the heat.  Later, I drank the water from the vegetables.  It was as sweet as a glass of fruit juice.  Amazing!


I always do that; add a litle more water to my veggies and then drink the liquid just before they're through cooking, hence I get all the benefits of the vitamins ... etc ... actually, I usually add a little ev olive oil or butter and seasalt before drinking it up ... it's so good  and a little hot liquid helps digestion ;D ;)
Posted by: 913 (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:57pm; Reply: 99
I've been lurking a while (actually several months) and finally decided to post! Y'all are some of the most helpful and informed people I have run across on the net. You are so kind to new folks and can always, always contribute something valuable to any query. I think you're grand.

As for the original post . . .

I'm not having a lot of luck cultivating a taste for soy cheese. I've tried several different brands in several different dishes and it still tastes like "green plastic." I'm not giving up though! If it's a beneficial, I'm all about learning to love it.

I'm southern so I was raised on okra, black-eyed peas, and all the greens--loved 'em them, love 'em now.
I'm not a big fan of pumpkin seeds (not sure why) but I do love peanuts! (Again, the southern thang!)

I'll eat rice cakes--even though there are strong similarities to munching on styrofoam. (Spread with a little peanut butter, it's flavored styrofoam but way better.)

Big coffee fan, glad it's a beneficial. Same thing with red wine. I do miss my sweet tea though. It's the hardest thing to order water with lemon in restaurants when everyone else is chugging the tea.
Posted by: Lisalea, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 3:59pm; Reply: 100
Quoted from Victoria
Another way to eat spinach is wilted.  I find it much nicer than well-cooked.  It is such a tender green, it doesn't really need cooking.  If you cook meat in a pan, after it is done, remove the meat, pour off excess fats, and put in the clean spinach while the pan is still hot.  Stir around in the hot drippings until the leaves are wilted, and well saturated in the drippings and seasonings that were left in the pan.


I usually eat spinach with barley, butter and seasalt .. it's simply delicious !!!  ;) ;D
Posted by: Drea, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:03pm; Reply: 101
Quoted from richgirlred

I'm not having a lot of luck cultivating a taste for soy cheese. I've tried several different brands in several different dishes and it still tastes like "green plastic." I'm not giving up though! If it's a beneficial, I'm all about learning to love it.


Welcome richgirlred!

I've yet to discover a soy cheese that didn't have an avoid or two (or three!) in it, so now I stay away from it entirely. The texture isn't so great to me that I want to waste eating it with avoids.

I tend to eat goat or sheep cheese instead. Not a lot, though, cause they can pack on the pounds and I'm trying to unpack the pounds at the moment. ;D
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:11pm; Reply: 102
Quoted from LISALEA


I usually eat spinach with barley, butter and seasalt .. it's simply delicious !!!  ;) ;D


Dear LisaLea,

Barley + type B = Avoid

;D :K)
Posted by: 913 (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:14pm; Reply: 103
Thanks Drea!

I think it's really "cheesy" (pun fully intended) when "they" (those evil food people) contaminate perfectly good beneficials with nasty avoids.

I love feta cheese but can only eat it "on" or "in" things--I can't take it straight. Sometimes I just need a piece of cheese! (for protein, to compliment my red wine, etc.) I usually eat low-fat mozzarella in those instances.

I hear you with the "unpacking the pounds" plan! I'm feeling less like a "Dixie Chick" and more like a "Dixie Chunk!"
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:18pm; Reply: 104
Quoted from richgirlred

I'll eat rice cakes--even though there are strong similarities to munching on styrofoam. (Spread with a little peanut butter, it's flavored styrofoam but way better.)


Try those rice cakes lightly toasted, and they're quite delicious.  It brings out the flavor and the crisp texture doesn't resemble styrofoam.  It's more like popcorn then.

I'm an ex-southerner, if you can ever be an ex, where the South is concerned.  I was raised on everything avoid, and those food tastes are still buried somewhere!  :-)
Posted by: 913 (Guest), Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:25pm; Reply: 105
Toasted? I never thought of that! They definitely need a little sumpin' sumpin' to spark them up a bit. My two dogs, who will eat virtually anything that hits the floor, walk away in disdain from rice cakes!

Honey, once a southerner, always a southerner! If you were born here, you never lose your birthright! I'll bet I could bake you a biscuit that would make you slap your mama! (If I were still baking biscuits, which I'm not, I promise! Really, no biscuits baked around here, no way . . .)
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:34pm; Reply: 106
Oh, you tempt me, RGR!  :-)  Even though I wouldn't touch them with a ten-foot pole, it makes me salivate just to hear the mention of southern biscuits, especially if you have some freshly churned sweet butter like my Grandmom used to make, and then smother the whole thing with some hot gravy.  

Pure avoid heaven!  (Maybe we could have a few sausage patties on the side!)
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, March 17, 2007, 4:35pm; Reply: 107
On the subject of disliking beneficials, I seem to quickly develop a taste for anything and everything that is really healthy for my body.  The only thing I have any difficulty with is fish.  I do love salmon, but it's not beneficial for me.  I have actually come to love sardines, DREA!!  :-)  It took me a while, but the key seems to be to eat them with other foods that you already like.  

Most of the fish that are beneficial for me, I've never heard of.  Common ones like Cod, I only like breaded and deep fried, which wouldn't work for me, since the whole frying process seems very unhealthy to my way of thinking.  Maybe I'll get beyond it, and experiement a little, but I don't eat flour of any kind, so that limits my options with cod.

Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds.  :-)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, March 18, 2007, 8:55am; Reply: 108
Quoted from Victoria

Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds.  :-)


Oh I´m with you for sure !
Mackerel is very common here in tins with tomatosauce - seved on ryebread with mayo- and I alwys felt like :X when my friends in school had some.....
My kid feels the same about theese fishy sandwiches...
Problem with fish is that it has to be sooo fresh that most of us do not get it anymore unless we fish ourselves.

Yesterday I wanted to cook some cod- took some up from freezer- from a high class company- and when they defrosted they smelled so horrible fishy!
I understand why a fatty fish like mackerel/herring or slamon can smell strong!-
but cod should not since it is so lean!!!
I got so angry that I wrote to their consumer center- it simply must be bad fish !
Cod has alwys been a "safe" fish for me- pure white flesh- not fishy at all.... but after this I will only buy fish in fish shops.

Posted by: Drea, Sunday, March 18, 2007, 2:22pm; Reply: 109
Quoted from richgirlred
I love feta cheese but can only eat it "on" or "in" things--I can't take it straight. Sometimes I just need a piece of cheese! (for protein, to compliment my red wine, etc.) I usually eat low-fat mozzarella in those instances.

Have you ever tried pecurino (sheeps cheese)? Really good, but a little goes a long way.

Quoted from richgirlred
I'm feeling less like a "Dixie Chick" and more like a "Dixie Chunk!"


ROTFLMAO
Posted by: 702 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 12:38am; Reply: 110
Pineapple!  I find it hideously disgusting.
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, March 19, 2007, 3:10am; Reply: 111
Okay.  After reading 5 pages of okra and turnip green complaints, I, as a born-and-raised Southerner, see the need to educate y'all.

There are several ways to make okra, the best of course being fried in a trusty ole iron skillet.  My mama always cut it up fresh and coated it in corn meal and fried it in safflower oil.  We (now all on the BTD) have experimented with spelt flour, rice flour and millet flour, and millet flour is our favorite, as it makes the okra crunchy.  If you cut it up fresh, it's not slimy at all.  If you have to buy it frozen, just thaw it out then you can rinse the slime off or just go ahead and coat it really well in whatever flour you're using.  Fry it in olive oil till it's browned or nearly black.  It will be a little gummy in the middle if you use frozen, but still very tasty.  My husband won't eat it unless it's burned to a crisp.  I like to sprinkle a little freshly ground coriander on it.  Salt it if you feel you must.

Okra is fine in a gumbo too, if you can eat any of the ingredients in gumbo, or add it to soup.  If you steam/boil it, leave the top on and use it as a handle--stab it with your fork and eat the good end.  Actually, you can eat the stem too if you've cooked it long enough to be tender.  Once you get used to it it's actually pretty good.  But if you're trying it for the first time, go for fried.  Here's something I have yet to try but have read it's good:  if you grow okra yourself (I highly recommend it if you live in zone 6 or South of), you will end up with a few pods that escaped your notice and got too big and tough to eat.  In that case, you can leave them on the stalk to dry, then shell out the seeds like peas.  You can cook them like dry beans and they're good protein.

Now, the traditional Southern way to cook greens is with a ham bone or bacon.  Obviously that's out for all of us unless we use turkey bacon (which usually contains at least one minor avoid).  If you can have apple cider vinegar, sprinkle a little on your cooked greens.  Delicious!  If vinegar is out, use a little lemon juice.  Also, some types of greens are more bitter than others.  If you find them really aweful by themselves, throw a few into soup or dry beans and they're less obvious.

Around here, when somebody complains that I've made something yucky again (usually turnips is the only thing to get that comment), I say, "Hey.  In this house we eat to feel good, not because it tastes good."
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 19, 2007, 4:36am; Reply: 112
Thank you Ribbit, for educating us LOL! I'm loving the greens and okra. I just had to get up the nerve to try okra for the first time. Now I eat it almost every week. I haven't been able to find it fresh in the stores (probably not the right season), but can find it canned and frozen. I actually kind of like the slightly gummy texture; especially the seeds. I'm glad to hear that there are substitutions for breading and frying. I'v been sautee-ing the okra in a bit of ghee and salt it at the end of the cooking. Yummmm.
Posted by: Drea, Monday, March 19, 2007, 4:36am; Reply: 113
Quoted from Lyrica
Pineapple!  I find it hideously disgusting.


More for me!  ;D
Posted by: 702 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 6:30am; Reply: 114
Quoted from outdoordrea


More for me!  ;D


Awesome!  ;D 8)
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, March 19, 2007, 2:58pm; Reply: 115
Quoted from Victoria
Mackerel is fantastic for my blood type, but it is really pretty distasteful for my tastebuds.  :-)


Victoria, you may like to try and cook fresh mackerel in lots of lemon juice (and water), and maybe bay leaves & allspice, i.e. 'marinated'.

To prepare cod (I can only buy it frozen), I cook onions and garlic in olive oil, then add the fillets, and: turmeric, sweet paprika, a little bit of hot paprika, bay leaves and: ground cardamon, ground ginger, ground coriander seeds, a dash of cinnamon and maybe tiny dash of cloves, and: little water. 20-25 min on low-medium heat. It's too delicious. How can it be that I myself cook something so tasty, I wonder.

Posted by: Victoria, Monday, March 19, 2007, 6:12pm; Reply: 116
Ribbit,
Thanks for that wonderful southern fried Okra recipe!  :-)

Yael,
When you cook your fish in water, do you cover it while cooking?  I can't visualize how you do it?  Is it in a skillet with only a little water, or in a pot with a lot of water?  Thanks for trying to help me like fishes!  :-)
Posted by: 803 (Guest), Monday, March 19, 2007, 8:31pm; Reply: 117
Yael, where around these parts do you get frozen cod?
Posted by: Lisalea, Monday, March 19, 2007, 8:51pm; Reply: 118
Quoted from Victoria


Dear LisaLea,

Barley + type B = Avoid

;D :K)


I just saw this post today !! :o

and we've since discussed the barley confusion, hence at least for now till further notice by Dr. D it's a neutral and I just ate some today for lunch with brussels sprouts, feta cheese, olive oil, onions and cayenne pepper !! ;)
Yummmmiiii  :P
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 1:16am; Reply: 119
Quoted from shape5
Yael, where around these parts do you get frozen cod?


a) In Machane Yehuda at the fish mongers': David Dagim opposite Ha'Egoz St. - my regular at the market (expensive though, NIS 65 per kilo), and Ohana Dagim both keep it.
b) although you can find it wrapped in vacuum in any supermarket (mostly by Delidag), I prefer to buy at Itliz Shoshani in Emek Refa'im, because they are trustworthy and I can rely on the way they handle the merchandise, that is, once  the fish is thawed you can trust you won't have to throw it immediately into the dustbin. I buy my fish at Shoshani's regularly, and also at David Dagim, where you can find a variety of wonderful fresh fish from the sea. Wonerful time to visit the market is of course Fridays at 6:30 AM.
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 2:34am; Reply: 120
Quoted from Victoria
Yael,
When you cook your fish in water, do you cover it while cooking?  I can't visualize how you do it?  Is it in a skillet with only a little water, or in a pot with a lot of water?  Thanks for trying to help me like fishes!  :-)


Yes, I use a pot and cover it while cooking, so as to keep the heat and not let the water evaporate. For cod, the water doesn't have to cover the fish - the less the amount of water the tastier the result. The recipe for the mackarel is a hearsay,  my best friend told my 3 days ago how she prepared it. I dared to write about it because she told me that she enjoyed it so much. When I do it myself, I'll cover the mackarel well with the lemon juice and water, and will report.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 3:28am; Reply: 121
Thanks, Yael,
I saved your fish recipe in my recipe files.  The spices you use with the cod sound very good.  Have you ever tried cooking it for a shorter period of time?
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 5:49am; Reply: 122
Quoted from Victoria
Thanks, Yael,
I saved your fish recipe in my recipe files.  The spices you use with the cod sound very good.  Have you ever tried cooking it for a shorter period of time?


Hi Victoria,
The thing is, I just wouldn't dare cooking a fish for less than 20 minutes, for fear it's not completely cooked, for fear of worms, germs etc. I never touch raw fish either... I'd rather overcook it a bit...
Love
Yael  :)
Posted by: 803 (Guest), Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 9:50am; Reply: 123
Yael, thank you for the info. I was at the shuk on Thursday (but got salmon), but Emek Rephaim is right around the corner. Sort of.
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 1:08pm; Reply: 124
Quoted from shape5
Emek Rephaim is right around the corner. Sort of.


That's very good - I come all the way from Malha!... He's really very good. Clean, professional, respectable, lots of customers. Also the price of fresh wild salmon fillet is much lower than at the shuk, and sometimes there are 'mivtza'im'. Enjoy!!  :D  8)
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 10:11pm; Reply: 125
Thank you for sharing your okra recipe with us, Ribbit.

I enjoy the taste, texture, and flavor of fresh okra.  

And thank you yael p for sharing your fish cooking tips with us.

Alia
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 11:54pm; Reply: 126
Parsnips are it for me.  I keep trying them and I HATE parsnips, or as I call them Alien carrots.

I can't believe all of you peeps who don't like turnips these are honestly one of my favorites I eat them almost everyday
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 20, 2007, 11:56pm; Reply: 127
Hey Laura,
Want to share with us some good ways to prepare turnips?  :-)  By the way, I like them.
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 3:18am; Reply: 128
Quoted from lkpetrolino
Parsnips are it for me.  I keep trying them and I HATE parsnips, or as I call them Alien carrots.


Alien carrots; that's good. I wouldn't say that I love parsnips, but they aren't bad in a carrot, ginger, apple juice combo. I made some roasted vegetable fries on Sunday, and parsnips were one of the three veggies...carrots and rutabagas being the other two. Of course the carrots were delicious, the parsnips were edible, but the rutabagas sort of tasted like cauliflower. I've only had rutabaga once before and frankly, I don't remember what it's supposed to taste like. :B

I did manage to eat them all, however, so I guess they weren't that bad. ;D
Posted by: Laura P, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 4:44am; Reply: 129
I recently tried eating a parsnip again last week and almost gagged.  I love rutabegas too, but can't eat as many of them as turnips since they are pretty starchy for me.

Expect a turnip extrodinare blog from me shortly
Posted by: Vicki, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 11:56am; Reply: 130
Try juicing parsnip for a nice surprise!
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, March 21, 2007, 4:25pm; Reply: 131
I juice parsnips all winter with beets, carrots and fennel.  Otherwise, I carefully choose only the small ones with a uniform shape, not that long, long stringy tail.  I scrub them very well, or scrape if necessary and steam them with carrots and red onions, maybe some baby kale or mustard greens.
Posted by: Ribbit, Friday, March 23, 2007, 9:14pm; Reply: 132
My husband's PhD work was in marine biology (genetics) and he and all his buddies agreed that they'd eat any kind of sushi except salmon.  That's the only one they worried about when it comes to parasites.
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