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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  Well, the results are in
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 4:20am
Saw my ND today to get the results of the adrenal function tests.  

TAP Free Cortisol Rhythm:
7-8 a.m.     13      normal       13-24 nM
11-noon       4      depressed    5-10 nM
4-5 p.m.       3      normal         3-8 nM
11-midnight  <1    depressed     1-4 nM

Cortisol burden 21  ref values 23-42

DHEA  result 2  depressed DHEA  ref value 3-10 ng/ml

cortisol-DHEA correlation:  zone 4 - maladapted phase II
This condition is usually the outcome of chronic and protracted stress exposure

ISN  Insulin
Fasting      <3                    Normal:    3-12 uIU/mL
Post prandial  8  Normal     Optimal:    5-20 uIU/mL

Fasting: This insulin value is elevated in cases of insulin resistance.

Test: P17OH Progesterone  result 56 Normal Optimal 22-100 pg/ml

Test:  MB2S  Total Salivary SIgA   <5 depressed  Normal 25-60 mg/dl
                                                                       Borderline: 20-25 mg/dl

F14  Gliadin Ab, SIgA    7  Negative  Borderline: 13-15 U/ml
                                                    Positive: >15 U/ml

The glucose tolerance test of a month ago:

Fasting: 109    One hour: 229   Two hours: 148

My ND says I have insulin resistance, but if you look above it says that the numbers are elevated in cases of insulin resistance.  I don't think those numbers are elevated, but my glucose test would indicate that it is so.  Could <3 be considered elevated?

He wants me to go on Atkin's diet to reach ketosis so my blood sugar levels will drop.  I have been following Dr. D's Diabetes book and sticking pretty close to all those super beneficials and beneficials.  Although he agrees with the BTD for healthy people, he thinks the Atkin's approach is better for diabetes control.  HELP!!!

I don't know what the SIgA or the Gliadin tests or scores mean, but they must play a part in my overall health or lack of it.

I'm pretty sure I need some more help to get back to real health.

Thanks,

Sharon
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Thursday, August 17, 2006, 9:50am; Reply: 1
The IGA-thingy & also the gliadin test was to know if you have probs. with grains containing gliadin; gliadin is everywhere to be found where gluten is too.....mostly- hope I am not wrong here- the tests are done when ther's a  form of syndrome x to be suggested and therefore allmost those tests are done here in Switzerland because this prooves also the resistance, caused by gluten-gliadin intolerances-might be even considered forms o allergic reactions and/or nutrition-intolerancews (foodintol.) If I remember well- I think up from 4-5-5 on the scala one might be called borderliner to a form of pré-diabetic ??) ::) .....any other sugs. are welcome ;) :D
Posted by: Whimsical, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 12:01pm; Reply: 2
Hi Sharon,

I can't remember exactly what you eat, but if you decide that you don't want to do Atkins, maybe try an O-non type diet instead?  Ie: no sugar, grains, or dairy.  For the stress, you also should probably increase the intensity and amount of exercise you get.  You can also integrate meditation, stretching.
Posted by: resting, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 12:54pm; Reply: 3
Hi Sharon,

Because you are way-up-north, there may be parameters in your lifestyle that is somewhat unique compared to a more 'southerly-style'.  It might help with the balancing to follow the recommends in 'Lights Out' by TS Wiley (not to worry right-now ... these will start in mid-autumn) and a magnetic mattress http://www.magneticosleep.com/

I am also very curious how you handle calcium and what your levels of vitamins D3 and K2 are ... calcium can be an important balancing mineral ...

John
Posted by: mikeo, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 1:13pm; Reply: 4
try staying away from any neutral grains, starches or sugars that have a high glycemic index which O's sometimes like to eat... speaking from experience. these foods cause a significant rise in glucose in the blood

rice cakes
cooked carrots
honey
pumpkin
watermelon
rice crispies
millet
brown rice pasta
parsnips
dates
processed fruit juice
white rice
raisins
beets
bananas...yes I know...they are a bene...try to eat when they r semi ripe and chew them a bit more
long grain rice
spelt cereal

a great sweetner is Agave syrup...very slow releasing sugar
Posted by: Vicki, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:16pm; Reply: 5
You mentioned waking up at night time rather than getting a full night's sleep.  I would investigate this further to see if you can resolve it.  Is a family member requiring your assistance at night?  Helping everyone get on a regular sleep pattern would be important to improve adrenal problems, in my experience.

Removing tv's, radios, clocks, computers and other equipment from your bedroom may be helpful.  A japanese style bedroom, with not much more than a bed.
Posted by: Don, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:27pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Vicki
Removing tv's, radios, clocks, computers and other equipment from your bedroom may be helpful.  A japanese style bedroom, with not much more than a bed.

Also check behind the wall where your bed is and unplug anything you find.

Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:43pm; Reply: 7
Thanks for the info.  Still not sure what the ISgA and Gliadin ratings mean for me.  John, my calcium levels haven't been checked, but I do take cod liver oil in the wintertime to help with the D3.

The starchy foods and grains I seldom or never eat except for the bananas, carrots, beets, parsnips and brown rice.  The root vegetables are rarely eaten during the summer.  I've used agave nectar for several months as the sweetener in my tea.  I'm still working on the same 2 pound bag of natural sugar I bought four years ago. I love blackstrap molasses, but use it a couple times a year.  Occasionally I do eat Ezekiel bread.  That's usually a couple times a month.

This whole thing is so aggravating because I do watch closely what I eat using the BTD as my guide and then emphasizing low glycemic foods.  Nonetheless, my fast blood sugar has continued to rise.

All I can say is that I'd hate to guess what shape I'd be in if I wasn't following the BTD, choosing lower glycemic foods, taking many supplements to assist with health issues, and doing much more walking.  I know stress plays a big part in this, but I thought eating right would offset the effects of the stress.
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:52pm; Reply: 8
Vicki and Don,  
Thanks for your notes.  My bedroom is very bare except for one little clock and a small air purifier.  The air purifier is used becasue of my severe allergy to my cat.  I wake during the night because my nose becomes clogged and breathing becomes difficult.  Nothing has ever worked to get my nose cleared and staying clear for more than 3 hours.  I've had my nose adjusted many times and I do those nose flushes.  Unfortunately the nose wash just increases the stuffiness.  So, I can get to sleep, but know that in about 3 hours I will be awake and needing to clear my nose agian.  This nose issue goes back for about 40 years.  Many of those years there was no cat around.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:57pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from northernstars
Vicki and Don,  
Thanks for your notes.  My bedroom is very bare except for one little clock and a small air purifier.  The air purifier is used becasue of my severe allergy to my cat.  I wake during the night because my nose becomes clogged and breathing becomes difficult.  Nothing has ever worked to get my nose cleared and staying clear for more than 3 hours.  I've had my nose adjusted many times and I do those nose flushes.  Unfortunately the nose wash just increases the stuffiness.  So, I can get to sleep, but know that in about 3 hours I will be awake and needing to clear my nose agian.  This nose issue goes back for about 40 years.  Many of those years there was no cat around.

??) I'm confused.  If there was no cat around for many of those years, why do you think the symptoms are from an allergy to cats?

Posted by: Don, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 5:59pm; Reply: 10
Do you have any metal tooth fillings?

Try to put the clock and the air filter as far away from you in your bed as possible.
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:01pm; Reply: 11
I don't think the symptoms are necessarily from the cat.  I tested at 35 on the allergy test that say 3.9 is a severe allergy and my score was 10 points above the highest level of allergy.  The point I was making is that many people assume the stuffiness is because of the cat.  But, I am stuffy whether or not there is a cat around.
Posted by: Don, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:04pm; Reply: 12
Do you have lines in your fingerprints?
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:05pm; Reply: 13
Don, I do have one tooth filling that is silver.  The dentist was going to remove the filling a couple months ago, but says the tooth will either have to be pulled or I need a cap.  The cap would cost $990 and I would have to pay $490.  That is too much money.  The tooth is the only molar I have left on the bottom on that side, so if I want to chew anything, I need to have it there.  He says there is a great possibility that the tooth would break apart if he removed the filling an replaced it with a resin one.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:09pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from northernstars
I don't think the symptoms are necessarily from the cat.  I tested at 35 on the allergy test that say 3.9 is a severe allergy and my score was 10 points above the highest level of allergy.

Oh, wow, well, if that test was specific to a cat allergy than you are right, it sure does seem definitive, result-wise!  But you are also right, it seems more is going on than just the cat allergy, if you are also symptomatic when you are sans cat.
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:09pm; Reply: 15
Don,
A couple fingers do have some lines that are off and toward the side on my fingers and not on the pad itself.
Posted by: Don, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:16pm; Reply: 16
I discovered that leaky gut was the cause of the worst of my severe sinus problems. Do you have any candida problems?

The leaky gut and blood sugar problems can be caused by mercury toxicity.
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:17pm; Reply: 17
That allegy thing has been difficult.  There were years when I had not pets.  Years when I owned a poodle or other non-allegic dog.  Years with a cat.  Years when I have had birds.  Years with no plants.  Years with many plants.  Nothing has seemed to matter as far as my nose goes.  

There may be something in Alaska that is bothersome, because when we lived in Virginia (with dogs and cats and carpets) I only had problems a couple times a year.  Then when we moved back to Alaska, my nose started giving me problems again.  Yet, on the allergy test, I showed negative to the trees, pollens, grasses, etc.  I wonder if I'm not overly sensitie to the volcanic ash that is still in the ground.
Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 6:19pm; Reply: 18
I did have candida a couple years ago, but was able to get rid of it and all the spit tests since have shown no candida.  Leaky gut, I don't know.
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 7:19pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from northernstars
Don, I do have one tooth filling that is silver.  The dentist was going to remove the filling a couple months ago, but says the tooth will either have to be pulled or I need a cap.  The cap would cost $990 and I would have to pay $490.  That is too much money.  The tooth is the only molar I have left on the bottom on that side, so if I want to chew anything, I need to have it there.  He says there is a great possibility that the tooth would break apart if he removed the filling an replaced it with a resin one.



Sharon, it sounds like the dentist is talking about putting a cap on your molar with the "silver" filling left in place.  Whatever you decide to do, please don't go that way!  You'd be spending a lot of money without getting rid of the silver-mercury amalgam.  The status quo is no better as regards the mercury, but at least it isn't costing you $490!

I know you don't want to lose the function of that tooth, but you do need to consider the possibility that some of your health problems are being caused or exacerbated by mercury from the filling.  You might want to consider having the tooth pulled and then being fitted for partial dentures.

Posted by: northernstars, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 9:27pm; Reply: 20
Carol, I may have to go that route, but right now finances just don't permit it.  He was talking about removing the silver, and then either replacing it with the resin or just the cap.  I really don't remember because the thought of coming up with nearly $500 was just cost prohibitive.  So, maybe a little later in the year I can think about having the tooth removed.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 9:38pm; Reply: 21
You also may have allergies to things in your bedroom. . . old carpet; pillows which can harbor mites; dust, etc.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, August 17, 2006, 9:52pm; Reply: 22
Once a tooth is removed, it is permanent.  
I have two large fillings left which need to be crowned.  It will be a while before I come up with the funds, but I believe that once I am committed to doing something, the money will become available somehow.  Maybe an opportunity to make some money that I'm not even aware of yet.  
Posted by: Vicki, Friday, August 18, 2006, 3:41am; Reply: 23
Waking every 3 hours when sleeping for 40 years is rather stressful!

I would do neti pot several times a day for a few weeks to see what improvement that brings.  I would use simple salt water rather than anything else (tinctures, baking soda, etc).  

For advanced neti pot use see the details at http://www.jalanetipot.com/

If you do want to avoid gluten, that would include the ezekiel bread.  I've been off ezekiel bread for many months now and it is okay....

I have a mouth full of mercury and understand the problems with it but focusing on improving sleep is something that would be incredibly helpful in the short term.  

Throw out old pillows.  Wash the bedding regularly and put vinegar in the rinse, etc.  

Carpeting is serious problem as well.  Sleeping in another part of the house may change your sleep habits!
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, August 18, 2006, 4:31am; Reply: 24
I'm having the carpet in my bedroom ripped out this weekend.  I dread the mess, but I have come to accept the fact that even though I vacuum it, the thing is old and full of xxx****~~####, and probably a lot of other stuff, too!  :-)

I had the livingroom carpet removed this past winter, and wood floor laid down.  It's a process.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Friday, August 18, 2006, 5:49pm; Reply: 25
I had this done (kind of did it myself with DH) and am glad I did. Cleaner. breathe easier.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, August 18, 2006, 6:01pm; Reply: 26
Anyone have recommendations on "clean" (as in allergy free) pillows?  The only think I'm seeing around here are pillows encased in a non-porous cover.  They seem very hot and sweaty against the head!  
Once I had a Kapok fiber pillow, but have not seen any since.  Mine are down, which I think can really breed allergens over the years.
Posted by: northernstars, Saturday, August 19, 2006, 12:40am; Reply: 27
If we don't have to pay $6,500 for a new septic system this fall/winter then I might be able to replace most of the carpeting with some kind of wood flooring.  The floors in Alaska are notorious for being very cold during the 8 months of winter, so I am a little hesitant about anything other than carpeting.  Cold floors seem to keep the surrounding area quite cold and with the price of natural gas the thought of turning up the heat to offset the cold floors is frightening.

So far the septic enzymes I bought seem to be keeping the septic system working, but it has only been a couple months.  Sure hope those enzymes work.  They say they do at 38 degrees and above.  I know that the water comes out of the ground at 34 degrees, so it may be iffy.  I'm just assuming that the decomposition that should be going on is increasing the surrounding temperature in the septic system and will therefore allow the enzymes to work efficiently.

The carpeting we have is old and even though we have a very good vacuum cleaner, I know there is still much that is left behind.  

On the other issue of neti pots; whenever I use one my nose is incredibly stuffy for at least the next couple hours.  It has not gotten better over the past year of use.  My nose can be clear when I begin to use it and when I am done, the stuffiness in very apparent.  Don't know why.  I use it as directed and only use sea salt.

Our pillows are filled with water and we bought them from our chiropractor.  They do help with neck alignment which does help with the sleep.  Bedding is thoroughly washed weekly and I'm using the Arm and Hammer brand of laundry detergent as that seems to be the least irritating.  Will try the vinegar in the rinse.
Posted by: Vicki, Saturday, August 19, 2006, 11:03am; Reply: 28
Dealing with symptoms.  Your sinuses are a lot bigger than your nose.  That's where the mucous is coming from ..when you use the neti pot, it brings that mucous out.  If you start using the neti pot more than once a day, you may find that the stuffiness starts resolving.  The site I linked has more details on advanced use which includes getting the solution deeper into the sinuses.  Huffing to send air OUT through the nose and push the mucous out without closing either nostril is important after neti pot use.  This forceful but un-obstructive huffing helps dry the sinuses.  

Getting at a possible cause.  Throw rugs can be used in place of wall to wall carpeting.  Definitely make sure they will not pose a falling hazard.  Throw rugs can be cleaned and dried easier than wall to wall.  Rental carpet cleaners leave the carpet so wet that it breads mold and other problems.  Commercial carpet cleaners do leave the carpets dryer so less problems with mold but still not problem free by any means.

Aggravation of the cause.  In winter, I'm sure you seal the house pretty tight.  So that means that any mold issues with your carpet will cause even more problems than in summer.  Light layers can help keep you warm while indoors.

I'll send some more ideas in PM.  
Posted by: 1501 (Guest), Saturday, August 19, 2006, 12:43pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from northernstars
If we don't have to pay $6,500 for a new septic system this fall/winter then I might be able to replace most of the carpeting with some kind of wood flooring.  The floors in Alaska are notorious for being very cold during the 8 months of winter, so I am a little hesitant about anything other than carpeting.  Cold floors seem to keep the surrounding area quite cold and with the price of natural gas the thought of turning up the heat to offset the cold floors is frightening.


You might think about looking into the underfloor heating that is out there now...if you are laying a new wood floor you can get it installed beforehand. I've heard really god things about it.

I have wood and never find cold floors to be an issue but my feet are really tough from going barefoot so much. ;)

Laura
Posted by: northernstars, Saturday, August 19, 2006, 8:19pm; Reply: 30
Vicki, I'll check that other web site out.  Maybe more often would be beneficial.

Semmens, Can those floor heating units be installed in an already built house?  Everything that I have seen show it being installed before construction of the flooring.
Posted by: 1501 (Guest), Saturday, August 19, 2006, 8:28pm; Reply: 31
I think if you are putting down a new wood floor (over subfloor), you can...the heating element goes between the layers. Just like if you were putting down ceramic tile you could put it between the subfloor and the tile.

Posted by: northernstars, Saturday, August 19, 2006, 9:23pm; Reply: 32
Semmens, thanks.
Posted by: resting, Sunday, August 20, 2006, 12:39pm; Reply: 33
Hi Sharon,

living in a cold climate like you .... flooring and insulating are most important - it used to be THE only option available ... wall-to-wall carpeting or hardwood flooring.  But with recent innovations (like cushion flooring) the options are very versatile ... even warm ceramics in winter.  Please, check out your options from a contractor.

We should also get cleaned (especially if old or very new) all duct work ... huge potential for mold and dust.

We should also not have a (better possibility with a newer home) a house that is too air-tight ... it accumulates deadly (radioactive) radon gas.  This gas is normal and will cause no problem with an exchange of air ...

................ just some of the facts about 'winterizing' a home ...........

John
Posted by: northernstars, Sunday, August 20, 2006, 5:41pm; Reply: 34
Thanks, John.  For heating we have a gas boiler that runs hot water through baseboard heaters, so we don't have air that is blown around.  Our house was built in 1978, so it isn't really air tight, although my husband did seal up many drafty areas around the windows last year.  I also keep the door to the solarium open all night and there is lots of fresh air that comes in through there.

I'll check with our contractor friend and see what the costs are for cushion flooring.  I am to the point of wanting to get rid of the carpeting.  
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, August 22, 2006, 9:29am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Victoria
Anyone have recommendations on "clean" (as in allergy free) pillows?  The only think I'm seeing around here are pillows encased in a non-porous cover.  They seem very hot and sweaty against the head!  
Once I had a Kapok fiber pillow, but have not seen any since.  Mine are down, which I think can really breed allergens over the years.


It is the same we get here- they are absolutely horrible to sleep with imo.
I got new goosedown/featherpillows and duvets friom Ikea when I got my daughter - I wash them at minimum 60 C/ 140 F sometimes 95 c / 203 F every 3 months- that is what the allergie organisation/ docs  recommends here.

I got rid of all carpets  except loose cotton rugs - that can be washed .
In my livingroom i´ve got a 100% wool carpet that I wash every year - but that is it - clean woodfloors are much easier to keep clean.

You can install heatingsystems under woodfloors- but a good layer of insulation under the floor can help a lot as well.
My friend on Greenland has woodfloors and they are not cold at all.
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Tuesday, August 29, 2006, 10:31pm; Reply: 36
Victoria, I love my buckwheat pillows. I've bought some at WF....don't know where else, but ....they are awesome.
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