Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  Dr D?  .....transfusions with type 0
Posted by: 828 (Guest), Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:01pm
I have a question about transfusions.

Type 0 is universal, so a Type A could get it in a blood transufusion.

I am having surgery in Nov, and wondered ---

if I get a transfusion of Type 0 -- how will this affect my blood type lectins?

thanks,
d
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:14pm; Reply: 1
all blood types A, B and AB have the fucose sugar of type O, this is why O blood is called 'universal'.

problem exists if an O gets a transfusion from an A or a B or an AB.......their antigen sugars
cause a reaccion.
hope this helps......
O- fucose
A- fucose + NAG
B- fucose + DG
AB- fucose + NAG+ DG
Posted by: KimonoKat, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:40pm; Reply: 2
Technically O- is the universal donor.  O+ can give to other + types.  They can not give to negatives.

AB is the universal receiver I believe.

Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:40pm; Reply: 3
Diana -- From what I have seen, you are highly unlikely to receive type O blood.

A friend of mine was in the hospital, and I happened to be visiting her when the blood-bank lady and the nurse came in to give her a transfusion.  They checked and double-checked her blood type (A+) against what was in the bag (A+) before starting the transfusion.

I suspect that an A+ would be given O blood only if no A blood was available.  A is a very common blood type, so this is unlikely to occur.

I'm hoping that some of our blood-bank people will either confirm or correct what I have said.

Posted by: 828 (Guest), Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:44pm; Reply: 4
My question is about what would happen to lectins if they DID give another Type some Type 0 blood in a transfusion.

I'm not worried, just curious.

thank you!
d
Posted by: KimonoKat, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:52pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from dkite
My question is about what would happen to lectins if they DID give another Type some Type 0 blood in a transfusion.

I'm not worried, just curious.

thank you!
d


Type O- blood is used in emergency rooms everywhere. All the other blood types have the Type O sugar structure.  I don't believe that you would have any notable negative effects of getting Type O blood, even if there were lectins in it. Those lectins won't kill you immediately (but not getting a much needed blood transfusion might).  The positive effect would be to save your life in an emergency, or during a surgical proceedure.

Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:53pm; Reply: 6
You have raised an interesting question.

If a type X receives a type Y blood transfusion, should they avoid the type Y avoids for a while afterward?

I have heard of cases where someone had an organ transplant, and experienced changes in their personality, preferences, etc.  One case that sticks in my mind was a vegetarian who suddenly craved Chicken McNuggets -- which turned out to have been the favorite food of the organ donor.  This sounds like an urban legend, but as I recall, I read this in a reputable publication.  Now, they would not give an O heart to and A patient -- but one wonders what other pertinent factors have not yet been identified.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:56pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Carol_the_Dabbler
You have raised an interesting question.

If a type X receives a type Y blood transfusion, should they avoid the type Y avoids for a while afterward?

I have heard of cases where someone had an organ transplant, and experienced changes in their personality, preferences, etc.  One case that sticks in my mind was a vegetarian who suddenly craved Chicken McNuggets -- which turned out to have been the favorite food of the organ donor.  This sounds like an urban legend, but as I recall, I read this in a reputable publication.  Now, they would not give an O heart to and A patient -- but one wonders what other pertinent factors have not yet been identified.


I've heard of similar stories. I even have an unread book on my shelf about a woman who got a heart transplant of a young man, and started craving drinking beer after the transplant.  She never drank beer before.

I tend to believe it's not the organ per se, but the residual auric field of the individual donating the organ, still in the tissue.

Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 6:56pm; Reply: 8
One additional point -- You can request that you not be given any transfusions.  Different hospitals probably have different rules regarding this, and different states may have different laws -- but I have heard of cases where transfusions were against the patient's religion, so they were given saline solution instead.  This seems to be a perfectly adequate substitute in many cases, because it maintains the total volume of blood.
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 7:01pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from KimonoKat
I tend to believe it's not the organ per se, but the residual auric field of the individual donating the organ, still in the tissue.



Either that, or the generally-accepted idea that one's personality and memory reside in one's brain is vastly oversimplified!

Posted by: Lola, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 8:47pm; Reply: 10
Os fucose sugar antigen is present in all other blood types........so no problem, it s that easy.
Posted by: Vicki, Friday, July 28, 2006, 4:26am; Reply: 11
Why not donate blood to the bank several times now for the purpose of having it on hand for your surgery.  That way you are protected and only get your blood back if needed?  
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, July 28, 2006, 5:59am; Reply: 12
Yup, shouldn't affect you too much.  A little extra fucose in your blood stream wouldn't make any changes to your diet necessary, and unfortunately, it won't increase your ability to digest meat...since that is a function of genetic linkage instead of the actual antigen's presence.
Posted by: Dr. D, Friday, July 28, 2006, 9:56am; Reply: 13
A blood tranfusion will also not change the antigenicity of the tissues, besides the fact that they will almost never transfuse A with O other than in an acute emergency or shortage.
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Friday, July 28, 2006, 1:45pm; Reply: 14
hmmm ;) Peter all is possible here :D ;) they even tried to go for hearttransplants from an A to an O and were wondering why I didn't worked :o :-/ ....thatswhy Zürich isn't anymore allowed to do so...only specialist of superspecialists in Bern ::) (shhh)(think)(disappointed)
Posted by: 828 (Guest), Saturday, July 29, 2006, 6:53pm; Reply: 15
thanks everyone.

Actually .....rather than being worried about any possible negative effects of getting Type 0 blood in a transfusion during surgery, I was simply wondering just out of curiosity whether or not I would then have a few Type 0 Lections and could eat meat for a while!

Frankly, I could not care less what Type they give me as long as it is OK for a Type A Pos to recieve, as long as it is disease-free!
:)
d
Posted by: KimonoKat, Saturday, July 29, 2006, 7:34pm; Reply: 16
Ah, so it was wishful thinking!  ;D
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, July 29, 2006, 8:34pm; Reply: 17
diana, after your post I called my parents and asked them if I had ever gotten a blood transfusion, in hopes of the same thing ;) after they said no I decided that perhaps an O nurse sneezed on me or something soon after I was born!
Posted by: resting, Saturday, July 29, 2006, 9:37pm; Reply: 18
Hi,

I keep wondering about our modern use of transfused blood.  A few decades ago, I underwent a series of xenotransplants of sheep fetal organ tissue.  The method had been developed in the medical school at Heidelberg, Germany.  At the time, the technique was named cell therapy.

The sheep were given abortions and the organs were fractionated and freeze-dried.  Before injection the organ tissue was re-hydrated.  

In many ways, this technique is similar to blood transfusions except organ tissue was used instead of blood.  But they found that the implanted tissue always went to the site of the diseased organ ... the match made before implant .... because each organ had its own unique sequence of amino acids in the organ's proteins.  And we were told to not eat lamb for 2 months post-implant.

If this same holds true for blood, then blood too could be freeze-dried ...it's good for a minimum 10 years that way ... and can even be used in tropical countries without refrigeration.  This also may be of use in a war zone .... or emergency situations?

But I have no idea whether blood can be processed this way.

John
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Sunday, July 30, 2006, 12:21am; Reply: 19
::) thatswhy the *Frischzellentherapie* is not anymore the hit as it was because there were some super-reactions...incl. deathe of clients ::)  :o btw. it wasn't that good against MS nor other sickness
as they tried to make us believe- not for clients and not for therapists....:P
Posted by: resting, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 2:23am; Reply: 20
Hi Isa,

you might have the name right, because I do not know what it was called in German.  Although I suspect that it was a little before its time.  There are some of its aspects that can be used in modern-type therapies ... ie. in stem cell therapies very often the cells are placed close to the site of the wound during surgery.  This is not at all necessary, because cell-proteins will migrate to any organ in the body if they are subcutaneously injected.

One of the problems with fetal tissue is that they are too young.  Colostrum 'matures' much of the intestinal tract and immune system.  Many diseases originate from the GI tract, so this needed 'maturation' is not transferred.  When I was in Auschafenberg I saw a young teenager staggering from one wall to the other down a hallway.  A friend said that he had been in a coma for almost a month and his parents had brought him to the clinic as a last resort.  What I was witnessing was the boy on the cell treatment after 2 days.

re. death ... more than 5 million injections were used ... only 1 death from a lady who used the therapy too fast .  She had a second set of injections in 2 months time, instead of the recommended 6 months.  Most of MS has to do with problems in digestion .... this is probably why cell treatments were ineffective ... they did not suit.

Like most therapies still today, the cell therapy doctors did not put very much effort in nutrition beyond not smoking.  It would be very helpful to have this blended with BTD and the Vega-tester ... to select the best cells ... The use of a 'substance circuit' in the bio-circuits may help too.

John
Posted by: leila (Guest), Sunday, July 30, 2006, 6:53am; Reply: 21
Quoted from Carol_the_Dabbler


If a type X receives a type Y blood transfusion, should they avoid the type Y avoids for a while afterward?




When I read the above question, I couldn't help but wonder whether it would make any difference at all if a type X (BTD follower) receives a suitable type blood transfusion who's also a BTD follower? If so, how?..... faster rehabilitation maybe?

Leila

Print page generated: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 8:35pm