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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  Getting water into the cell
Posted by: italybound, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 4:33pm
I hope this is not just a simple question and I've overlooked a simple answer, but............
how do we get the water we drink and get from our fruits and veggie into our cells and not just our body? i.e. blood stream
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 4:44pm; Reply: 1
::) by gap junction....btw ;) :D :K) but have an ::) on this...there's intracellular & extracellular H2O :D
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 4:45pm; Reply: 2
Somehow I recall that water from fruit and veggies get into our cells easier than from water- is that correct ?
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 4:59pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
Somehow I recall that water from fruit and veggies get into our cells easier than from water- is that correct ?

Yes, Dr. D. talks about intracellular versus extracellular hydration.  Intracellular is when the water gets to the inside of our cells, deeply hydrating us.  Extracellular is when it just sorta flushes right through us without ever penetrating into the cells.  When we drink water (which is important, don't get me wrong!!!), it is a less efficient way to get intracellularly hydrated than when we eat fruits or vegetables with a high water content, as the fruit and/or veggie in question is a better delivery system to get the water into our cells; it is more readily utilized by our cells when it arrives packaged in a fruit or veggie.

Example:  After work and several obnoxious errands yesterday, I mowed my lawn and it was extremely (well, actually, not extremely, for Florida, but anyway) hot outside.  By the time I was done, I was way past the point of being thirsty and I knew I needed immediate hydration.  I drank some Gerolsteiner (mineral water), but I also ate some very ripe, delicious watermelon.  The watermelon was way more thirst-quenching than the mineral water (maybe because the latter was sparkling, but anyway).  However, the subjective experience of which is more thirst quenching probably doesn't mean much.  The fact is, the water in that watermelon probably had a better shot of getting deep into my cells than the mineral water did, although both are usable.  It is just that the water in the fruit is more readily so.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 6:14pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Edna

When we drink water (which is important, don't get me wrong!!!), it is a less efficient way to get intracellularly hydrated than when we eat fruits or vegetables with a high water content, as the fruit and/or veggie in question is a better delivery system to get the water into our cells;


My understanding is the amount of hydration also depends on how we drink the water and not simply on the amount of water consumed.

Gulp down several glasses at once is supposed to do a good job of flushing out the kidneys but not hydrating the body.

Whereas sipping small amounts of water over a period of time is supposed to result in better cell hydration.  
Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 6:26pm; Reply: 5
Pep, I love my sparkling water with a twist of lime, when it is hot this really cools you off
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 6:30pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from C_sharp


My understanding is the amount of hydration also depends on how we drink the water and not simply on the amount of water consumed.

Gulp down several glasses at once is supposed to do a good job of flushing out the kidneys but not hydrating the body.

Whereas sipping small amounts of water over a period of time is supposed to result in better cell hydration.  

Interesting!  Makes sense, too, as when we drink water at a high rate of speed, it will be more than we can absorb/utilize at one time, so the rest would go about the business of "flushing" our systems.  Conversely, if we just sip water slooooowly, each little bit has time to absorb and be utilized.

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 6:30pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from lkpetrolino
Pep, I love my sparkling water with a twist of lime, when it is hot this really cools you off

Word up.

Posted by: Laura P, Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 7:31pm; Reply: 8
ya down with me on that homebo'
Posted by: 794 (Guest), Tuesday, July 25, 2006, 11:38pm; Reply: 9
Electrolytes.  When we transfer sodium in and out of the cells they bring water in with them and out.  There a sodium pumps that exchange potassium for sodium.  When we get this exchange we flush out the cells, thus cleansing the cells.  The problem can be that we don't have enough potassium or sodium or it can also be that the pumps don't have energy.  ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is energy for the pumps.  Magnesium is key to the production of ATP.  It's not a good idea to take magnesium without calcium.  Around 1:2 ratio.  
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 1:07am; Reply: 10
Quoted from saverain
Electrolytes.  When we transfer sodium in and out of the cells they bring water in with them and out.  There a sodium pumps that exchange potassium for sodium.  When we get this exchange we flush out the cells, thus cleansing the cells.  The problem can be that we don't have enough potassium or sodium or it can also be that the pumps don't have energy.  ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) is energy for the pumps.  Magnesium is key to the production of ATP.  It's not a good idea to take magnesium without calcium.  Around 1:2 ratio.  


thank you saverain, this is the answer for which I was looking. I already knew the thing about fruits & veggies, but I wanted to know how to get the water we drink in there. :-)
So since I just had blood work done, it'll be 'portant for me to look at my sod & pot, which I was sure to ask to be tested, as well as a bunch of other stuff.  ;)       So ATP cannot be supplemented but only produced by the body by having plenty of mag and calcium? Is this correct?
Posted by: yaeli, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 1:59am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Edna

However, the subjective experience of which is more thirst quenching probably doesn't mean much.  The fact is, the water in that watermelon probably had a better shot of getting deep into my cells than the mineral water did,...


It surely does mean a hell of a lot, not necessarily in the direction of hydration extent, the question is exactly what. Perhaps it's the available sugars and specific minerals within the fruit/veg water, that hydrates and feeds us at the same time, and the thirsty body needs more than what mineral water offers.  ??)
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 3:37am; Reply: 12
Well, I think I'm going to start putting a few grains of Himalayan Crystal Salt in my tumbler of water that I am drinking and refilling countless times a day during this heat wave.
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 8:43am; Reply: 13
Quoted from pkarmeier
how do we get the water we drink and get from our fruits and veggie into our cells and not just our body? i.e. blood stream


My experience as an A with loads of waterretention before my BTD period, I must say that adhering to my A-diet diminished the bigger part of my extracellular water immensely.

With the high temps right now here in Holland I do minimize the intake of grain.
Only 1 slice of speltbread as lunch..
My amaranth/buckwheat porridge I used to eat every morning is replaced by plain soyyoghurt, with 1 tablspoon of ground flaxseeds, blueberries and walnuts, together with 1 cup of green tea and my MFCocktail... That's it!

My experience is that my grain-intake (even to a bigger extent: wheat!!) makes me keep the water in my system..
At dinnertime just veggies with tofu and a glass of red wine..

For the rest during the day: green tea, water....

Just my 2 cents to keep the (extracellular) water away!!  ;D

Take care and stay intracellular hydrated.... ;)

Take care..

Cocky  8)
Posted by: Schluggell, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 12:55pm; Reply: 14
Juices have the minerals with the water - Besides Sodium for the taking of energy into the cell, Potassium is also used for the removal of waste products from the cell.

Plain water lacks the additional elements to drive the intracellular reactions, so the body goes to 'waste mode' to jettison the extra liquid...
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 2:52pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Schluggell
Juices have the minerals with the water -.


Schluggell, what if one is trying to stay off fruit juice for the time? Is there anything else I can do? Thanks.  ;)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 3:05pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from pkarmeier


Schluggell, what if one is trying to stay off fruit juice for the time? Is there anything else I can do? Thanks.  ;)


Heidi Merritt used to recommend water with either a pinch of salt or a little lemon juice added.
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 3:07pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from C_sharp
Heidi Merritt used to recommend water with either a pinch of salt or a little lemon juice added.


Thanks I'll start w/ the salt. Anyone know which would work better - salt or lemon? :-)
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 5:57pm; Reply: 18
Why not use both, Pat?  Remember our conversation a while back about a couple of the great brands of salt?  Try a few grains of it (not to overdo it) in every glass of water, plus a bit of added fresh lemon will supply the minerals and electrolytes that Schluggell was talking about.  Sounds like a winner to me...and no sugars!!
Posted by: geminisue, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 6:02pm; Reply: 19
It was sea salt
Posted by: Whimsical, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 7:20pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from pkarmeier


Thanks I'll start w/ the salt. Anyone know which would work better - salt or lemon? :-)


I use salt because it is more convenient, but also because over time, drinking lemon water can wear away the enamel on your teeth (acid).  

For occasional use, a mouthful of lemon juice swished around is a great way to remove tea stains from teeth!  It also works on clothes...
Posted by: girly, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 7:44pm; Reply: 21
Use a straw.... :X
Posted by: italybound, Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 8:01pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Whimsical
For occasional use, a mouthful of lemon juice swished around is a great way to remove tea stains from teeth!  It also works on clothes...


Kate, thanks for the tip on whitening the teeth. Re: lemon for clothes, I use lemon juice (cheap) and white vinegar in place of bleach for my whites. Works great except on the most stubborn stains.  :)
Posted by: 794 (Guest), Wednesday, July 26, 2006, 11:03pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from pkarmeier


thank you saverain, this is the answer for which I was looking. I already knew the thing about fruits & veggies, but I wanted to know how to get the water we drink in there. :-)
So since I just had blood work done, it'll be 'portant for me to look at my sod & pot, which I was sure to ask to be tested, as well as a bunch of other stuff.  ;)       So ATP cannot be supplemented but only produced by the body by having plenty of mag and calcium? Is this correct?
 

I'm sorry I worded it wrong,  Magnesium attaches to the ATP to produce energy.  It doesn't produce ATP.  Protein enzymes produce ATP, don't know of a supplement.  I would concentrate on the sod and pot first, getting a good balance of calcium and magnesium can be tough.      
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Thursday, July 27, 2006, 9:33am; Reply: 24
Interesting and thanks for all the explanations
Yesterday I spent a WHOLE day in The HOT CITY -( I think all the americans and japanese has invaded Copenhagen :-D)
 and I realised that watermelonsmoothie was the only thing that kept me well- tried the plain water and just peed.
The juicebar made this smotthie:
frozen watermelon, raspberries and lemonjuice put in the blender It was so good that I wnt back after lunch and had a second.
So NORMally I would ask my "dessert" child to get plain water ( no sugar)
- but during this heatwave summer she has been allowed to make thin juicedrinks ( with organic cranberry or raspberry cordials ) and she has actually been drinking- no more fights! over her "no drinks" lifestyle !
Posted by: italybound, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 5:28am; Reply: 25
Looks like calcium plays a large role in getting water, nutrients, etc in and out of the cell wall.
http://www.realtime.net/anr/minerals.html

Does anyone see anything they don't agree w/ re: what it says each mineral is good for or symptoms of same?
Posted by: resting, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 11:00am; Reply: 26
Hi Henriette,

when young, very hot weather was always handled better with 'salt tablets' (KCl ...potassium chloride) in water.  For a kid, even 1/2 a tab = relief.  

John
Posted by: resting, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 11:20am; Reply: 27
Hi italybound,

it's really difficult to answer you re. minerals because their involvement is so diverse .... for instance zinc is in many more than 140 different enzymes and the count for calcium is more than 300.  These are only two of the major minerals ... other minerals are not as involved as these two.

Calcium in the GI tract is moderated by PgE1 (prostaglandin E1).  This is very important and even a drug company (Searle ???????????) has made a synthetic PgE1 for this purpose (C. Bates).

John
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Sunday, July 30, 2006, 12:14pm; Reply: 28
::) coenzyme A = Enada NADH, @ severain ;) :D
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 2:40pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from John_McDonell_O+
Hi Henriette,

when young, very hot weather was always handled better with 'salt tablets' (KCl ...potassium chloride) in water.  For a kid, even 1/2 a tab = relief.  

John


Thanks John- never concidered salt tablets- will IF this heat contiues.
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 6:18pm; Reply: 30
I'm pretty sure I remember celery and celery juice being very good for the body during hot weather.  Isn't it high in both potassium and naturally occuring sodium?  I know I crave celery juice during heat waves.
Posted by: KimonoKat, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 6:59pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Victoria
I'm pretty sure I remember celery and celery juice being very good for the body during hot weather.  Isn't it high in both potassium and naturally occuring sodium?  I know I crave celery juice during heat waves.



According to the spiral bound book Composition and Facts about Foods by Ford Heritage,

Potassium:
Celery has 341mg of potassium per 100 grams edible portion.

There are quite a few foods that are much higher.  Of about 215 foods listed for potassium, celery is right in the middle.  (High foods would be Dulse=8060, Kelp=5273, Irish Moss=2844, Dried soybeans=1677, Dried Lima beans=1529, Rice bran=1485, Dried Banana=1477.)

Sodium:
Celery is listed as #12, out of about 180 foods listed, with 126mg per 100 grams edible portion.  (Other higher sodium foods would be, Kelp=3007, Irishmoss=2872, Green Pickled Olives=2400, Dulse=2085, Sevillano Olive (ripe)=828.)

Celery is easy to pack as a snack and sounds like a good choice.  :D
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 7:12pm; Reply: 32
celery for sodium
bananas for potassium

YUM

p.s.  Of course, there's always seaweed.  Top notch foods.  Taste . . . mmmmm. . . ?  ?  It's an individual matter.  :-)
Posted by: KimonoKat, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 7:26pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from Victoria
celery for sodium
bananas for potassium

YUM

p.s.  Of course, there's always seaweed.  Top notch foods.  Taste . . . mmmmm. . . ?  ?  It's an individual matter.  :-)


I have two bags of dried seaweed in my cupboard.  Still trying to decide when to eat them lol!
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, July 30, 2006, 7:34pm; Reply: 34
Toasted, crumbled Nori is delicious tossed with chinook salmon and a bit of salt-pickled ginger!  
And dulse flakes are good in bland baked vegetables like parsnips, kohlrabi and turnips.
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