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BTD Forums  /  Testimonials  /  Organic Pastures Raw Cream: Update
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 12, 2006, 9:25pm
About a month or two ago, Whole Foods, near me, began carrying Organic Pastures Raw Milk and Raw Cream.  I really balked at the prices (1 pint of cream: $12!!)

Some folks here on the Forum said that the company is fantastic and produces a truly superior product.

Yesterday I met a guy who actually buys the cream...he's hooked. He says it's "Fantastic" and worth the price.  It's definitely a "company is coming for high tea" sort of purchase at that price.

So I asked the guy about other creams and how they compare.  He doesn't like the Devon Cream that the store carries, as he's from Those Parts and "there's just no comparison".  He only really likes the Organic Pastures stuff, which he enjoys on special occasions over berries but sneaks right out of the bottle with the fridge door open!

I'm still...not ready.  I wish it came in smaller containers.  Too much of a good thing...

Oh how I love cream...
I occasionally eat puffed rice cereal, with banana discs and ... Half 'n Half.  It's more filling than with milk, when I'm really hungry off-time...
Posted by: mikendomsmum, Friday, May 12, 2006, 9:40pm; Reply: 1
mmmmmmm  cream    I remember the stuff.  Creme brulee.  Whipped cream with lots of vanilla.  Coffee, regular.  Anything from Julia Child's book but especially the cauliflower au gratin.  I'm driving myself crazy.  
If I were a B, and I wish I were, I'd go ahead and get it.   :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, May 13, 2006, 1:01pm; Reply: 2
I love cream too ;D
- Summer is here and I can´t wait to eat strawberries with cream or raspberries with cream.

I have wondered why is cream NOT listed in typebase ? I know that B´s would likely be the only one to benefit for its testing...........
They have creamcheese, sour cream, butter and whole milk.

I wonder as well if there is any difference between the different creams like :
our cream: is 38 % with no additives, we can get coffee cream as well it is 18 % No additives
and cooking cream 18 % with wheat flour   >:( really silly product.

Sadly :'( we cant get double cream( 48%) - I used it a lot when  I lived in Ireland-
but it is easy to make with the high quality organic cream we get get ( non homogenized jersey cream- no additives) yummi
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Saturday, May 13, 2006, 1:53pm; Reply: 3
Now that you mentioned Julia Child, does anyone know what her blood type was?
I bet it was O or B!!  Maybe it was B if she could eat all that variety.
S S & L,
Mrs "T"     O+
Posted by: daisymay, Saturday, May 13, 2006, 4:22pm; Reply: 4
As a kid, I sometimes used my allowance to buy a pint of cream from our local dairy, and drank it straight out of the bottle!  Bet it at least didn't have the additives that store bought cream has these days.   If I could have any other dairy product, I'd want it to be cream!
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, May 13, 2006, 11:24pm; Reply: 5
When I was pregnant I drank Half and Half.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 16, 2006, 12:12am; Reply: 6
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
I love cream too ;D
- Summer is here and I can´t wait to eat strawberries with cream or raspberries with cream.

I have wondered why is cream NOT listed in typebase ? I know that B´s would likely be the only one to benefit for its testing...........
They have creamcheese, sour cream, butter and whole milk.

I wonder as well if there is any difference between the different creams like :
our cream: is 38 % with no additives, we can get coffee cream as well it is 18 % No additives
and cooking cream 18 % with wheat flour   >:( really silly product.

Sadly :'( we cant get double cream( 48%) - I used it a lot when  I lived in Ireland-
but it is easy to make with the high quality organic cream we get get ( non homogenized jersey cream- no additives) yummi


You're giving me the idea to BBlog on the subject!  ;) :D

Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Sunday, May 21, 2006, 9:32am; Reply: 7
::) hey gals, isn't that crazy...we think that the *organic* stuffies today is something exceptionelles, where I grew up, on our farm it was completely natural.....and you could have your creamy day without such thefty costs' every day.......at you ease as much you can.......eat.....:o

12 $...hey ::) (hand)(naughty)(hand)(think)(whistle)(whistle)(disappointed)(disappointed)(disappointed)(whistle)
Posted by: mikendomsmum, Sunday, May 21, 2006, 2:28pm; Reply: 8
In AZ selling raw milk products is illegal.  There can be a cow/goat share program but it's so difficult and is very closely regulated by the state, that it's not viable for most farmers.  It's usually a $50-$100 buy-in per person, for the cow/goat herd, then $10-15 per gallon of milk.  Cream is more expensive.  I had a cow share quite a while ago, before BTD and traveled hours to the farm to pick it up for my region (we took turns).  Then I had to deliver the milk to a central pick-up location.  What a pain in my rear.  
There are no raw milk products commerciallly available in AZ.  
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, May 21, 2006, 4:25pm; Reply: 9
sad isn´t it - the most natural product has become illegal,difficult or expensive to get :-(
Posted by: mikendomsmum, Sunday, May 21, 2006, 4:50pm; Reply: 10
It is sad and ridiculous.  Tobacco is legal but milk isn't.  Hydrogenated fat is AOK but not real cream.  Will human breast milk have to be homogenized and pasteurized before babies are fed in the future or will things change in the opposite direction regarding food?  
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Sunday, May 21, 2006, 4:57pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from mikendomsmum
It is sad and ridiculous.  Tobacco is legal but milk isn't.  Hydrogenated fat is AOK but not real cream.  Will human breast milk have to be homogenized and pasteurized before babies are fed in the future or will things change in the opposite direction regarding food?  


:-/ I hope things will swing back towards natural food- at least people are starting to get fed up here in Denmark asking for REAL food... so one can only hope and pray...
Posted by: Poly, Monday, May 22, 2006, 4:41pm; Reply: 12
I still dream about the raw milk we had at the agricultural college I taught at a few years back (pre-BTD of course). Straight from the cow, only skimmed and cooled down. It was heaven! The whipped cream made from the cream was to die for!

If there is anything I miss with my O diet, it is a nice cold glass of said milk! YUM! (And I know if anyone offered me a glass today, I would say YES and enjoy it (And ignore the gassy cramps afterwards! ;D))

Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
cooking cream 18 % with wheat flour >:(  really silly product.


Amen! What do those Arla-guys think of?? :o Oh yeah - MONEY!!! ::)

I still use cream - heavy cream. It's not listed - ergo it's neutral in my book. I know people say - "yes, but cheese is bla bla and milk is so and so, and there for bla bla"  (naughty) I say - it's not listed, it's neutral. There's no way of knowing, when it's not tested. (And IF it were tested to be an Avoid for O's, I would say: "Yes, but that's probably American cream - they add all sorts of strange things to their stuff, I'm sure Danish cream is OK!" ;)) I have to draw the line somewhere (hand), or I go crazy! ;D  
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Monday, May 22, 2006, 5:43pm; Reply: 13
try once our swich..cream ;) ;D :D (dance)(clap)(smarty)(whistle) 8)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Monday, May 22, 2006, 7:10pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Poly
)


I still use cream - heavy cream. It's not listed - ergo it's neutral in my book. I know people say - "yes, but cheese is bla bla and milk is so and so, and there for bla bla"  (naughty) I say - it's not listed, it's neutral. There's no way of knowing, when it's not tested. (And IF it were tested to be an Avoid for O's, I would say: "Yes, but that's probably American cream - they add all sorts of strange things to their stuff, I'm sure Danish cream is OK!" ;)) I have to draw the line somewhere (hand), or I go crazy! ;D  


Emma is the same...
She is pretty sensitive to regular milk- but the organic cream from Thise ( or Arla :-/) is fine with her- no reactions- so I let her eat it in the weekends... it makes life SO much easier for this B.. or more fun for her
She is btw made of raspberries and raw jesey milk ;D 12 years ago during a very hot summer

I had really GREAT cream in Austria once... never tasted so sweet dairy before.


Posted by: Poly, Monday, May 22, 2006, 8:42pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from ISA-MANUELA
try once our swich..cream ;) ;D :D (dance)(clap)(smarty)(whistle) 8)


I'm sure it must be heavenly! The grass those cows eat is like nothing else.

I remember once visiting a big fancy stable where they breed extremely expensive dressage horses. They had their hay especially brought in from Austria and Swizerland. I've never ever smelled hay as wonderfull smelling as this. It was intoxicating! :D

Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Monday, May 22, 2006, 9:09pm; Reply: 16
::) ;) :D ;D .....mountain-hay....with a lotds of dried herbs in ......
Posted by: EquiPro, Monday, May 22, 2006, 9:12pm; Reply: 17
I hate to keep being the naysayer here, but, as I have posted before, I would never - EVER - consume any raw dairy after working as a dairy milker.

I know, I know, the "Organic Pastures" and the like tout their "clean" dairy, but you'd have to go a LONG way to convince me that it was anything that I'd want to consume without pasturizing it first!

Then again, that's just me!   ;D ;)

A like to my post and experience with dairy:

http://forum.t-tapp.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=42487
Posted by: Poly, Monday, May 22, 2006, 9:13pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from ISA-MANUELA
::) ;) :D ;D .....mountain-hay....with a lotds of dried herbs in ......


Exactly! :)
Posted by: san j, Monday, May 22, 2006, 10:26pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Poly
I still use cream - heavy cream. It's not listed - ergo it's neutral in my book. I know people say - "yes, but cheese is bla bla and milk is so and so, and there for bla bla"  (naughty) I say - it's not listed, it's neutral. There's no way of knowing, when it's not tested. (And IF it were tested to be an Avoid for O's, I would say: "Yes, but that's probably American cream - they add all sorts of strange things to their stuff, I'm sure Danish cream is OK!" ;)) I have to draw the line somewhere (hand), or I go crazy! ;D  



Poly: Great attitude.  We are not AFRAID of food. ;)
Posted by: ISA-MANUELA (Guest), Tuesday, May 23, 2006, 3:48pm; Reply: 20
::) never- ever ::) ;) (dance)(clap)(smarty)(dance)(whistle)(sunny)(sunny)
Posted by: Poly, Tuesday, May 23, 2006, 9:30pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from exj_j



Poly: Great attitude.  We are not AFRAID of food. ;)


Especially not food I love! ;D

EquiPro, I know you're not a fan of raw milk, and that you've tested bacterial growth in raw milk (if I remember correctly) so I know you know what you're talking about.
All i know is, that I visited the cows' stable at the agricultural college several times every week with my students, and we visited the milking facility (ack - don't know the proper English word for it :-/) and sometimes helped with the milking, and it really didn't ruin my appetite for the milk at all. I know there are bacterias everywhere, and the cows were not exactly sterilized before the milking process began. But we drank the milk the same day and it was cooled down imediately, so the bacterias didn't have much chance of growing before consumption. I never thought of it as icky or harmfull in any way. :)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Wednesday, May 24, 2006, 6:07am; Reply: 22
The farm I got raw milk from ( just next to my parents house was very clean.
But I think it is bc he only had 40-50 jersey cows to care for.

Untill mid 197o there was farms here in Denmark that was specially chosesn to deliever a special clean infant milk.
It was looked after very careful, cows udders cleaned, milk tested, cows tested etc. It was raw because they knew that a lot/most of nutrision disappear when pasturized. This was before formulas was very common in Denmark. My cousins was brought up on it - never a problem.

My parents have a friend who used to work as a professor at the KVL ( University/college for all the green stuf:vets,landscapearchitects, farming etc) ( BTW Poly maybe you know him....)
and he told me that there was good bacteria in raw milk that would kill most of the bad bacteria if milk was polluted- HOWEVER pasturized does not contain theese good bacteria and enzymes so if it was polluted after it was pasturized( not that unlikely) it was much more risky to drink!

BUT he did add that the way milk is transported long distances and the fact that farms are so BIG today it is not possible to produce good quality raw milk that are safe for consumers.

However if BTD really spread: It would just be us rare B´s that needed the milk and the A and AB  to have a bit of yoghurt... so it would be possible having fewer cows- better quality ;-)

I have always felt fine with milk we got from the farm when Emma was little.
The reason I stopped was because it was not organic.
He treats his animals very good: They are in a large barn in the winter were they can move around as the like and from April to October they are on grass- a much better life than most konventional cows have here - but he still feed them non organic food so...
Posted by: Poly, Thursday, May 25, 2006, 10:52am; Reply: 23
Maybe I've run into that KVL-proffessor (KVL = The Royal Danish Veterinary And Agricultural University (official name ;))) of yours, Henriette. Depends on what department he belongs to. I mostly wandered about at the Section for Ethology (animal behaviour) under the Department of Husbandry and Animal Health. That Department has recently been split up, so now Ethology is under the Section of Population Biology under the Department of Large Animal Sciences.

Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
They are in a large barn in the winter were they can move around as the like and from April to October they are on grass- a much better life than most konventional cows have here - but he still feed them non organic food so...


Luckily most dairy cows live like this nowadays - organic and conventional alike! The cows at the agricultural college were the same. They had 80 cows there, btw - the average size of a dairy herd here in DK, I was told.

As far as I know (and I could certainly be wrong) the only difference between the way they treat organic and conventional dairy cows here in DK is in the feed, the medication, and in the way they treat the new-born calfs (conventional calfs stand in seperate calf-boxes and are taught to drink milk from a bucket from day 1 - organic calfs go together in groups with a nursing cow. I find the latter to be so much more "humane")
My father in law - who's a conventional pigs-farmer (:'() today- used to have dairy cows - also conventional. Even he, who's so conservative, only drinks organic milk, because it tastes much better. He tells me, it's because organic cows aren't fed corn - and corn gives the milk a bad after-taste. Hah! ;D
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 26, 2006, 11:59pm; Reply: 24
YAY: Henriette!!! I posted a blog JUST FOR YOU.  Go take a peek. Calling all B's and cream-lovers, see Santé_j's blog on the subject....

mmmmmmmmmmmmm.... ;) :D
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 12:02am; Reply: 25
sounds real creamy!!! )
Posted by: san j, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 12:03am; Reply: 26
Quoted from exj_j


You're giving me the idea to BBlog on the subject!  ;) :D



Here it is: I just posted it, and addressed it to you, Henriette! :D :K)

Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 4:14pm; Reply: 27
Thanks Sante  :K) looks great
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 4:18pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from Poly


As far as I know (and I could certainly be wrong) the only difference between the way they treat organic and conventional dairy cows here in DK is in the feed, the medication, and in the way they treat the new-born calfs (conventional calfs stand in seperate calf-boxes and are taught to drink milk from a bucket from day 1 - organic calfs go together in groups with a nursing cow. I find the latter to be so much more "humane")
My father in law - who's a conventional pigs-farmer (:'() today- used to have dairy cows - also conventional. Even he, who's so conservative, only drinks organic milk, because it tastes much better. He tells me, it's because organic cows aren't fed corn - and corn gives the milk a bad after-taste. Hah! ;D


Well another difference is that conventional cows do not HAVE to get on grass!

The farmer next to the school has about 40 cows -they never see the blue sky or the green grass :-(
Posted by: Poly, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 5:51pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from Henriette_Bsec
The farmer next to the school has about 40 cows -they never see the blue sky or the green grass :-(


Argh - grrrr...! Something like that just angers me to no end! >:(

exj_j - that mascapone-recipe made me drool! :P *slurp*

Posted by: san j, Saturday, May 27, 2006, 9:13pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Poly


Argh - grrrr...! Something like that just angers me to no end! >:(

exj_j - that mascapone-recipe made me drool! :P *slurp*



Poly, luv:  Can you go for it?  I mean, Mascarpone is not "rated" by Dr. D. yet.  And there are those who say, If O's can eat butter, why not Mascarpone (90+ percent butterfat)??

Anyway, save up your Avoid points for a Holiday Mascarpone Mousse, if so inclined and you're well? :-/ :K)

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