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BTD Forums  /  Supp Right For Your Type  /  Lips, Skin and Hair
Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, November 7, 2005, 8:54am
The cold weather will be making some of us dry!  Got any remedies for dry lips, dry skin and dry, frizzy hair?

For me, hair is the worst, followed by lips on some days!  I thru in dry skin for others reading this thread.

Thanks!  
Posted by: mikeo, Monday, November 7, 2005, 1:05pm; Reply: 1
98% aloe vera gel for skin, drink room temperature water throughout the day and find some bee's wax for your lips. Buy a small humidifier for your house or apartment. Hair...need a good salon conditioner
Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, November 7, 2005, 1:18pm; Reply: 2
Thanks Mike.  But only A's can have aloe unless skin is a different story.?.?  I've never heard of eating it, but it's listed as a vegetable!  

Good Salon Conditioner.....they either make my hair even dryer, really frizzy or leave a residue in my scalp!  Hair conditioners.....what a pain!

Room temperature water is all ready a go!  I'll have to look for some bee's wax!
Posted by: Debra+, Monday, November 7, 2005, 1:35pm; Reply: 3
Silicea powder for the skin, nails and hair.   Getting enough of your essential oils too.    AND...body brushing and using grapeseed oil afterwards.  :)

Debra
Posted by: italybound, Monday, November 7, 2005, 2:41pm; Reply: 4
slyparrot, how compliant are you? I find the more compliant I am, the less I am bothered by these things. If I cheat, ick....... :-(
Posted by: Don, Monday, November 7, 2005, 2:41pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from slyparrot
...only A's can have aloe unless skin is a different story.?


Yes, topical use of item is different than eating an item. The food list values only apply to eating an item.

Posted by: Laura P, Monday, November 7, 2005, 4:13pm; Reply: 6
I use coconut oil as lotion, works wonderfully
Posted by: Gee Whiz, Monday, November 7, 2005, 5:35pm; Reply: 7
Many shampoos and soaps are far too drying.  Wash your hair less often, though scrub and rinse it well in the shower with just water or conditioner, don't blow it dry, and look for the gentlest shampoo you can find.  Try something without sodium laurel sulphate or sodium laureth sulphate.  Some health food store brands are good. Sometimes it's a fine line beween clean, stripped of all healthy oils, and too oily.  It may take a bit of experimentation.

Try to find a good lotion with lanolin or goat's milk in it.

Hope this helps.

Oh, and drink lots of water and use a humidifier if needed.
Posted by: Joy, Monday, November 7, 2005, 8:18pm; Reply: 8
I just started using a soap called Superior Alep Soap handmade in France.  It's ingredients are 60% olive oil and 35% bay tree oil.  It's recommended by French dermatologists for eczema, sporiasis.  But also for skin types that are fragile, easily irritated, etc.  That's my skin.  It's made from an ancient method and is supposed to last a long time.  I've also purchased some clay mask products from them.
If anybody wants to check it out its http://www.Sunclaytherapy.com.


Joy
Posted by: Alia Vo, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 1:46am; Reply: 9
Joy,

Thank you for the website.  I perused the site quickly; the soaps sound terrific and they appear so gentle and pure.  Have you used any other varieties other than the Superior Alep Soap?

Alia
Posted by: slyparrot, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 8:12am; Reply: 10
Italy, as far as the avoids go I have been 100% compliant.  Although, I need to ask about pepper and peppercorns.  If peppercorns are ok, then grinding them into pepper is ok, right?  How is that different than black pepper?  

Some of my hair products do make my hair more dry.  Even some Shikai products.  There is one good one that I ran out of.  Don't forget I live in the desert making it very very very dry.  My body feels normal when I'm out of town anywhere else in the country!  Maybe getting a humidifier is a good idea but I don't wanna get any germs from it.  Yuk!

I don't think I could not wash my hair.  It may be better to skip every once in a while but I just gotta wash!  Silicea?  Grapeseed oil?  Coconut oil?  Superior Alep Soap?  I knew all kinds of ideas would pop up for this!  Thanks!
Posted by: Debra+, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 12:55pm; Reply: 11
slyparrot-Silicea powder can be bought at your HFS.    The one I go to has it in capsule form with biotin.  Grapeseed oil I can buy at my grocery store or through Watkins.  Every so often I do an oil treatment on my head with the grapeseed oil too.   Black pepper is different from peppercorns as it can have mold in it.   When you grind peppercorns yourself you are using it right away and the mold doesn't have a chance to form.  :)

Debra
Posted by: Alek, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 2:25pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from ironwood55


Yes, topical use of item is different than eating an item. The food list values only apply to eating an item.



I find it confusing that we are avoiding cemicals in shampoos and body washes, but can use topically avoid items, since they are all going in through the skin anyway. Any explanation? alek
Posted by: Don, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 2:40pm; Reply: 13
You just explained yourself.  The food item is going through the skin, not the digestive system.  It is not that the avoid foods are chemically bad the way somethings are in commercial body care products.  It is because the foods react negatively in the digestive system.
Posted by: Joy, Tuesday, November 8, 2005, 4:22pm; Reply: 14
Alia,

No, this is the first time I tried the soaps.  I've used the prepared clay mask as a facial and they are very good.  I bought the soap with the highest bay tree oil content because I was always putting lotion on my hands for dryness.  Since using the Superior Alep Soap I've noticed the difference.


Joy
Posted by: Alia Vo, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 2:19am; Reply: 15
Thanks, Joy.

Much appreciated!


Alia
Posted by: slyparrot, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 8:11am; Reply: 16
Debra,

Does grapeseed oil leave a residue on your head/hair?  Does it wash out easy?  Do you use shampoo right afterwards?  How about the bathtub?  Sounds messy.
Posted by: Debra+, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 6:04pm; Reply: 17
slyparrot-I just leave it on for an hour or so (depending on what I am doing) with a towel wrapped around my head and then jump in the shower and shampoo normally.  And, yes, you do have to wash the tub afterwards or the next person can slip and fall.  Mostly gets on the bottom of the tub.  Not really that messy.    :)

Debra
Posted by: Michelle (Guest), Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 8:12pm; Reply: 18
slyparrot ~ you know the love affair you are having with olive oil? :D  Well, I just moved to a higher elevation and have been battling dry skin, dry hair (due to hard water), dry eyes and dry lips.  :'(  I use olive oil. And to feel special and girlie I've added lavendar oils or geranium oils (more for summertime).  And literally it's changed my skin.  :o  Just a thought. But now I love it!! And, just yesterday a cashier told me I smelled wonderful ~ go figure. ;)   It's gotta be the olive oil. ;D  You might want to try it, since you probably have a bottle or 2 of it in the house!
~michelle
Posted by: Cheryl_O_Blogger, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 9:00pm; Reply: 19
I use a spray in leave in conditioner to tame the frizz. You can use it between shampoos to freshen up hair too.  Just buy the varieties in the health food stores to avoid extra chemicals.

Besides personal care products, don't forget to max out on the beneficial oils in your diet as well as vitamin C containing foods that also support healthy skin and hair.
Posted by: Mickey, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 9:19pm; Reply: 20
I recommend a Chlorine filtering shower head.  This time last year i was having a problem with irritated facial skin.  I especially noticed it after taking a shower.  I then read somewhere that the chlorine in the water might be causing the itchy skin.  Soo i went to WF's and bought a shower filtering head.  The shower head was $40.00 and the replacement filter is about $20.00, you need to replace the filter once a year.  Since then i have not had any dryness problems with my skin, in fact it has even gotten better than before i got the irritation problem.  It also helps with hair and all over body skin.  My hair is much softer and shinier.  Like Cheryl said make sure your getting all the goodies on the inside.  I believe in getting down to the source instead of putting a bandaid on the problem.  In my case the source was the chlorine in the water.  The filter also helps with colored hair (like mine), it helps to preserve the color longer.  Chlorine just bleaches it out over time.

Good luck and let me know if you decide to go with the shower filter and how it works for you.

Mickey
Posted by: Mickey, Wednesday, November 9, 2005, 9:21pm; Reply: 21
Cheryl,

Can you recommend any brands of leave in conditioners.  I always have a problem with product buildup on the days i don't wash my hair, anything i try just seems to dull my hair and look coated.

Thanks!
Mickey
Posted by: 1427 (Guest), Thursday, November 10, 2005, 4:27am; Reply: 22
CHLORINE - If you can't use a shower filter drink water with lemon in it after bathing (or swimming in a pool for that matter) or rub lemon oil on the bottoms of your feet.

JING JANG Creme and Lip Balm are my all time favorite and quite simply the best quality out there!!! They are all natural and organic. It is the best. Make up artists use it devotedly.
Posted by: Vicki, Saturday, November 12, 2005, 2:47am; Reply: 23
I wash only the parts of my body that "need it" on a daily basis.  Then once a week or so I shower or take a bath.  

It takes a week or so to adjust to not shampooing daily but most people can transition.  Daily shampooing causes stripping of natural oils and your body will over produce oil to compensate.  Here is more information:  http://motowngirl.com/no_shampoo.htm  For lips, Burt's Bees is nice but staying away from sweets and drinking water are great preventatives.

Turning down the heat in the home is also helpful for preserving humidity.  Use clothes/blankets to warm up.  If you get a small room humidifier, the old style one that heats the water is more sanitary than the new cool air ones.  Leeping Greenly will disagree with me on that point, but check out Dr. Sears recommendation for children.  A humidifier will make the room feel cooler.  You must clean the humidifier regularly as per the manufacturer's directions.
Posted by: Laura P, Saturday, November 12, 2005, 3:12am; Reply: 24
I do the same thing with the shower, works very well
Posted by: san j, Saturday, November 12, 2005, 8:32pm; Reply: 25
Dry, frizzy hair needs a very, very light touch of oil, if you're just getting ready to go out and face the world, i.e., applied to the hair when dry.  Get yourself some Rosa Rubaginosa (also called "rosa mosqueta") oil.  Aubrey Organics has one, as does Oshadhi.  Another great hair oil is Camellia.  Either one of these can be applied to your hand - just a drop or two.  Then rub it into both palms/fingers and run your hands through your hair, the under-hair first, ending with the top layer. (Add more if needed).

If you have Dr. Hauschka products in your area, there's a Neem Hair Oil that is very nice, too.

After I've washed my hair, I apply the oil, as above, to the damp hair.  It's a great "leave-in conditioner".  And completely natural.  One ingredient.  Hard to beat that. Then your hair self-dries with less frizz.
Posted by: geminisue, Saturday, November 12, 2005, 11:17pm; Reply: 26
[face=Arial][/face][b][/b]if my hair is frizzy I put two tablespoons olive oils on my hair and rub it in with the warm water running on it, wash  my body than go back to my hair and shampoo and rinse with water.  Manages it quite well
Posted by: awmcc77 (Guest), Thursday, November 17, 2005, 12:22am; Reply: 27
One thing for INTERNAL consumption that I have found helpful for keeping my skin and hair healthy and less dry during the cold weather is one tablespoon of flax oil everyday.  It's a little gnarly at first to simply swallow a tablespoon of oil straight, but it tastes fine.  I buy the super loaded flax oil (I think it has primrose oil and some other nutritious stuff).  Hope it helps--
Posted by: 1319 (Guest), Thursday, November 17, 2005, 6:28am; Reply: 28
Yes, I take Omega 3 and I'm sure it has helped me along with the BTD.
Posted by: ion, Thursday, November 17, 2005, 1:34pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from exj_j
Dry, frizzy hair needs a very, very light touch of oil, if you're just getting ready to go out and face the world, i.e., applied to the hair when dry.  Get yourself some Rosa Rubaginosa (also called "rosa mosqueta") oil.  Aubrey Organics has one, as does Oshadhi.  Another great hair oil is Camellia.  Either one of these can be applied to your hand - just a drop or two.  Then rub it into both palms/fingers and run your hands through your hair, the under-hair first, ending with the top layer. (Add more if needed).

If you have Dr. Hauschka products in your area, there's a Neem Hair Oil that is very nice, too.

After I've washed my hair, I apply the oil, as above, to the damp hair.  It's a great "leave-in conditioner".  And completely natural.  One ingredient.  Hard to beat that. Then your hair self-dries with less frizz.


Hallo Exj j
Is there any of the wonderful staff you know good for oily but dry hair?
I don't mind a bit of volume as my hairs are straight (not curly) and thin.
I feel the hairs near the roots are ok, but the end bits are so dry.
Also I am thinking to make a light perm. I this case I would need something to add moisture to them. I am not in good relations with commercial conditioners and masks. I have great faith in natural oils. I don't mind either to prepare water with herbs to use as rinse water. Any idea?
Thanks
Ion


Posted by: curious1 (Guest), Sunday, November 20, 2005, 3:13am; Reply: 30
Hi,
Am wondering whether anyone has a comprehensive EFA to recommend that is blood o non-secretor friendly? The closest I have found is Ultimate Oil by Nature's Secret but it has safflower oil which is an avoid for most blood groups.
Am wondering what would be the effect from taking a oil supplement with just one avoid?
Also, anyone knows what Dr Dadamo means when he says,
1) flocculates serum proteins?
2) increases polyamine and indican levels?
Quite confused by his descriptions frankly.


And if I am using Organic Olive oil for dry skin, what products do you recommend? (sunclay therapy looks good but seems very costly).
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, November 20, 2005, 3:44am; Reply: 31
Ion,
Are you able to purchase Aubrey Organics shampoos where you live?  If you can get them, I'll tell you the varieties I like.  They are totally natural and have none of the chemicals that even the regular natural foods store shampoos have.
Posted by: ion, Sunday, November 20, 2005, 9:46am; Reply: 32

Hi Victoria.
I am not so sure if I can find here the Aubrey products.
I must go out hunting.
Most of times I surprise my self with the products I find
and I had no idea that are available.
It will be handy if there is a site with those products so at least I know how do they look like, so I can have a eye open when searching.
But what I really seek are little tips from aromatherapy and herbal world for hair beauty/health care.
Posted by: Alek, Sunday, November 20, 2005, 12:59pm; Reply: 33
yassou Ion, here are some tips from aromatherapy, for your dark hair.
Conditioner for normal hair: To impart an incredible shine use jojoba oil and some essential oils, paying particular attention to the ends, on long hair. Rosmary is traditionally recommended to bring lustre and depth to dark hair. A once-weekly treatment will condition hair beautifully and add lustre that ordinary conditionars don't quite manage.
In 2-3 teaspoons of jojoba oil, add 2 drops of rosmary, 2 drops of lavender, 1 drop of clary sage. Put it on your hair for 1 hour and wash as usual with neutral shampoo.
there is also hair rinse for dark hair, that gives shine and protect the hair: 2 drops of rosmary, 1 drop rosewood, 1 drop geranium in 1 litre mineral water. Shake well and pour over your head. All the best alek
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, November 20, 2005, 6:39pm; Reply: 34
Hi Ion,
Good to see you!!

I agree that nothing takes care of our skin and hair like all natural ingredients.  For my skin, my habit is this...Thanks to Equipro:
I dry brush before my shower to remove dead skin and improve circulation.  Then after the shower, while still wet, I massage entire body with my oil mixture of
1/2 extra virgin olive oil
1/2 grapeseed oil
a dash of vit. E oil
a few drops of essential oil.  I am presently using lavander oil.

You could get creative with this body oil and add things like Rosa Mosqueta Oil or Jojoba Oil.

I love Alek's suggestions for oil treatment for the hair and scalp.  Unfortunately, oil treatments don't work for me because my hair is very baby fine and silky and any oil weights it down.  I have been forced to find extremely non-damaging shampoos and hair care products.  That's why I mentioned Aubrey to you.  For best results, I alternate between their Neutral Henna Shampoo, Chamomile Shampoo and Blue Chamomile Shampoo.  The Henna one adds shine; the Chamomile variety adds body and the Blue Chamomile one is conditioning.   I use neutral henna on my hair also.  Some people consider henna to be drying, but just don't overdo it.  It makes my hair glossy shiny, and my daughter with waist length beautiful hair uses it also.  It adds body and coats the hair with a shiny cellophane-like natural material.  It protects and glosses the hair.....just beautiful!!

No matter how much natural oils and stuff we use, if we continue to wash with harsh shampoos, it won't work, so be careful.

For completely pure shampoos, here is the Aubrey website:

http://www.aubrey-organics.com/spec_prods/normal_hair_cat.cfm

Also for a couple of great skin care products, check out this site.  They have a GREAT face cream called Mimosa Blossom.  Also their body lotion, Jasmine Nourishing, is fantastic!

http://www.supersalve.com/
Posted by: halpics (Guest), Monday, November 21, 2005, 1:45am; Reply: 35
Has anyone used the bar shampoo from J.R. Liggett's.. just started and I can tell a positive difference but have just started... I am going to try the chlorine shower filter..it makes good sense. Thanks!
Posted by: Alek, Monday, November 21, 2005, 3:10pm; Reply: 36


Hi Victoria,
Having fine hair myself i agree oils weight hair down, but jojoba is different. It gives the body, since it is different from other oils. The best test is by putting it in the fridge. It turns into wax. It also rinses from the hair with hot water.
As for chamomille shampoos, they are only for blond hair.
I have contacted Aubray-Organicks and they are not as yet in Greece, but we will wait for Ion to comb the market, she is good at it, and in Athens. Regards alek
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, November 21, 2005, 4:58pm; Reply: 37
Hello Alek,
I certainly like Jojoba oil.  It has a very similiar composition to human body oils.  I've never tried it on hair, though.
Why do you say that Chamomile is only for blonde hair?  Is it because it is a golden colored flower?  It does seem to have a golden effect on my dark blonde hair, but my daughter also uses it.  Her hair reflects her southern Italian genes and her color is brown, and getting darker by the year.   She loves the shampoo.  Aubrey also has the Blue Chamomile Shampoo which is not at all gold color.

I used to use the Rosemary oil on my hair when I was younger and my hair was thicker and lighter colored.  It is supposed to be for brunettes, but I liked it also.
Posted by: tjwisc (Guest), Monday, November 21, 2005, 10:23pm; Reply: 38
A few people have commented that I looked younger, especially my skin.  I think this is due to adding olive oil to my veggies and smoothies (I think uncooked helps more).  I make sure I get at leat 2t of O.O. a day (this is per Weight Watchers) and see/feel softer skin almost immediately after a meal in which I've added it.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 12:18am; Reply: 39
Jojoba oil isn't really an oil.  Technically it IS a wax.
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 4:11am; Reply: 40
Halpics,  I've never tried the bar shampoo from J.R. Liggett's.  However, I have purchased one by a company called Camamu.  It says Laranja Solid Shampoo.  Here's the ingredient list:
olive, castor, coconut, jojoba, sweet almond oil, avocado oil, apricot kernel oil and shea butter.  Scented with essential oils of lemongrass, tangerine and clove.  

I'ts different than anything I have ever shampooed with before.  I find I don't need a conditioner after I use it.  And I have to alternate it with other shampoos because all the waxes and oils seem to coat my hair just a little (not severe).  It feels very healthy though, and makes a great shaving bar!!

exj_j......How would you compare putting Rosa Mosqueda or Jojoba on the hair as a Leave On conditioner?
Posted by: ion, Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 11:37am; Reply: 41
Hallo Girls!!!
You are fantastic.
So many beatyfull advices.
I have to save this mesages and study them carefully.
I have never try Jojoba oil and is worth giving a try.
Other oils, yes I have done and it is true, they weight hair down.
Victoria the camomile traditionaly is used by  blonde.
Summertime if you rince your hair with camomile tea they get lovely colour when under the summers sun.
Me as I am brunnet with thin hair I 'll go for the rosemary,I think.
I am looking for Aubreys products. I let you know if I have any  results.
Alek thanks a lot for the essential oils info. Found your toothpaste though. ;)
My love to all
Ion


Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 4:35pm; Reply: 42
I have tried a lot of the natural lipbalms (I hope no one is still using those petroleum based ones!!) and so far my favorites are the ones that use hemp seed oil as the primary ingredient.  It is such a perfect substance for the lips..not too waxy, not too oily, and doesn't wear off too fast.
Posted by: slyparrot, Saturday, December 31, 2005, 7:42am; Reply: 43
What do you think camomile will do to med/light brown hair?  Does it leave hair soft?

Eating olive oil does leave my skin soft.  But doesn't eating it everyday exceed the weekly allowance?
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Saturday, December 31, 2005, 8:23am; Reply: 44
I don't think anyone has mentioned vegetable glycerin yet.  This is the same stuff that several of you use as a sweetener, but it also works very well to keep skin moist.  I use it in two fairly-interchangeable ways:

1.  Transfer about half an ounce into a one-ounce dropper bottle (available at most health-food stores if you don't have any clean used ones around the house) -- don't fill the bottle any fuller than that, or it will be hard to control the drops.  Rub a few drops onto toweled-dry skin immediately after a bath or shower.  I do this to keep my heels from cracking and peeling in the winter -- just one drop per heel, rub in well, then wipe off any excess with a Kleenex or toilet paper.

2.  Mix one part vegetable glycerine with three parts aloe vera gel (I use Lily of the Desert Aloe Vera Gelly, which is made with organic aloe).  Keep in a jar and use like hand/body lotion.  This is the only hand lotion I ever use, and it really works wonders for my dry skin.  It also soothes that itchy spot between my shoulder blades, as well as random patches of dry-skin rash.

Like Vicki back on page one, I have really dry skin, so I bathe only every-other day in winter, with "touch-ups" as needed (and I shampoo my hair only every-other week).  I inherited this schedule from my mother, who also has very dry skin.  After each bath, I apply natural progesterone cream to my face and neck.  This product (available at health-food stores) is primarily used to alleviate pre/post-menopause symptoms, but it's also a terrific moisturizer.  I am constantly being told that I don't look my age (whereas before I started using the cream, I looked about my mother's age).
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, December 31, 2005, 10:18pm; Reply: 45
great tips Carol! thanks )

that progesterone cream you mention, on the face
would keep my hub out of business!!! )
not to mention, I won t be nagging him so much anymore!!! LOL
Posted by: Carol the Dabbler, Monday, January 2, 2006, 5:04am; Reply: 46
You're welcome, Lola!  (And my regards to your hub!)

********

If you get painful cracks at the very corners of your mouth (as though you've gotten a paper cut by licking an envelope flap, except that you haven't), a Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) supplement may help.  And, though the books don't mention this, I find that B2 also takes care of the cracks that I'd otherwise get at the corners of my fingernails every winter.

I'm finding that vitamin B supplements are not all equally effective for me.  One brand that I've had very good luck with recently is Solgar.  They have a line of individual B vitamins (as well as B complex) in vegetarian capsules -- quick, complete availability without the gelatin!
Posted by: Patty Lee, Monday, January 9, 2006, 8:15pm; Reply: 47
I highly recommend George's Active Aloe
http://www.warrenlabsaloe.com/
I have seborrheic dermatitis that seems to be resistant to the BTD's magic.  The aloe spray and gel have kept my winter flaky woes down to a minimum.  It is the only thing that's worked (including the steroids and anti-fungals my doctor threw at the problem).

Their aloe lotion is nice for plain ol' dry skin, although I think the scent is too reminiscent of baby powder.  
Posted by: Red Meat Eater, Monday, January 9, 2006, 8:20pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from Vicki
I wash only the parts of my body that "need it" on a daily basis.  Then once a week or so I shower or take a bath.  




Oh my goodness.

Posted by: Cheryl_O_Blogger, Monday, January 9, 2006, 10:53pm; Reply: 49
How could I not mention the skin health protocol, so glad those are back online.  There's also a skin health protocol in the new Menopause book, but I haven't crosschecked to see if it's different from the general protocol for skin health.
Posted by: Cheryl_O_Blogger, Monday, January 9, 2006, 10:56pm; Reply: 50
Quoted from Mickey
Cheryl,

Can you recommend any brands of leave in conditioners.  I always have a problem with product buildup on the days i don't wash my hair, anything i try just seems to dull my hair and look coated.

Thanks!
Mickey


Oops, didn't see this.  I tend to use Giovanni products.  I also used another for color treated hair, but can't recall the name of it.  I've grown off the color now, so using the Giovanni.  The leave-in conditioners I use are spray in, so very light.

Posted by: slyparrot, Saturday, January 21, 2006, 12:34pm; Reply: 51
I just purchased 4 bottles of Aubrey Organics.  My head and skin was VERY itchy!  I'm thinking it might be the coconut oil because eating it will break my skin out in itchy red bumps.  Topically is supposed to be different, time and trial will tell!  

Any ideas on hair color?  I'm getting my first grays.  Henna?  Any experiences?
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, January 21, 2006, 9:08pm; Reply: 52
Henna works very well, if you don't have too much gray.  It makes your hair very glossy and seals the hair shaft to prevent tangling.  Some people say that henna is drying, but that has not been my experience.
If you choose a color that is close to or the same as your own, it should work beautifully.  Also, depending on your color, there are natural substances that enhance the color.  Substitute these brews for the water.  All teas should be brewed 20 to 30 minutes before using.

Chamomile enhances blonde and gold tones in Neutral, Blonde or Marigold Blonde Henna.

Coffee tones down red tones, deepens brown-red tones and covers gray.  Use brewed, not instant coffee.  After brewing, bring to a boil and then cool down and mix as directed.

Ceylon or Black Tea adds gold highlights to light brown henna.

Red Zinger Tea enriches red tines in Burgunday, Sherry, Mahogany and red Henna.

Apple Cider Vinegar helps to hold color on grey hair.  Add 2 Tb to henna mixture

Lemon Juice lightens blonde shades.  Add 2 Tb. to mixture

Different shades of Henna can be blended together.  For example:  3/4C Mahogany + 1/4 dark Brown = Dark Auburn

For excessively dry hair, add 1 beaten egg, 2 to 4 Tb. olive oil, or 2 to 4 Tb. plain yogurt to the Henna mixture.
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, January 22, 2006, 2:47am; Reply: 53
Quoted from Victoria
Henna works very well, if you don't have too much gray.  It makes your hair very glossy and seals the hair shaft to prevent tangling.  Some people say that henna is drying, but that has not been my experience.
If you choose a color that is close to or the same as your own, it should work beautifully.  Also, depending on your color, there are natural substances that enhance the color.  Substitute these brews for the water.  All teas should be brewed 20 to 30 minutes before using.

Chamomile enhances blonde and gold tones in Neutral, Blonde or Marigold Blonde Henna.

Coffee tones down red tones, deepens brown-red tones and covers gray.  Use brewed, not instant coffee.  After brewing, bring to a boil and then cool down and mix as directed.

Ceylon or Black Tea adds gold highlights to light brown henna.

Red Zinger Tea enriches red tines in Burgunday, Sherry, Mahogany and red Henna.

Apple Cider Vinegar helps to hold color on grey hair.  Add 2 Tb to henna mixture

Lemon Juice lightens blonde shades.  Add 2 Tb. to mixture

Different shades of Henna can be blended together.  For example:  3/4C Mahogany + 1/4 dark Brown = Dark Auburn

For excessively dry hair, add 1 beaten egg, 2 to 4 Tb. olive oil, or 2 to 4 Tb. plain yogurt to the Henna mixture.


Thanks Victoria

I went into my hairdresser today and told him I’d like to switch to natural products.  He told me that he’d help me with the color mixture when I picked one out.  I’ve only dyed my hair twice.  I was streaking it before.  But what if I start going gray faster?  Should I start with henna and switch to something else later?  What would that something else be?   ??) I need a touch-up soon, so I need to start investigating my options now.

Thanks

Arlene
(think)
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, January 22, 2006, 3:15am; Reply: 54
If you decide to go with an actual dye instead of henna, those are available in good natural foods stores.  I am sure that those cover grey.  But why don't you start with henna as long as you don't have much grey.  

Henna is not considered a dye.  It is a cellophane type of plant material that coats each hair shaft with either a neutral or a colored layer.  It takes a few weeks to gradually wear off.  It does not penetrate the hair like dye does.  It is not damaging to hair like repeated dying is.

My daughter and I do our own henna.  Several of our natural foods stores sell it in bulk, so we can scoop out as much as we want.  It is cheaper than the pre-packaged.  Although you can buy boxes of henna if you'd rather.  It's not hard to do, just a little messy.  If you decide to do it yourself, let me know and I'll walk you through it.  :-)

How long is your hair, and what color is it?
Posted by: slyparrot, Sunday, January 22, 2006, 9:11am; Reply: 55
My hairdresser refuses to use henna and says it's horrible.  She said one of her client's hair melted off with the rollers after a perm because there was henna in the hair.  Henna is tricky with chemicals.  

I have called a few places in the yellow pages and no one does henna!  I wanted to get henna highlights with the foil thing.  My hair is med brown in the winter and light brown in the summer.  I just purchased light brown by Light Mountain.  Ever use it?  Maybe I'll be brave and try to do this in a couple of days.  One of the web sites had people saying their hair turned bright orangy red after the 1st application but corrected after the 2nd application.  Yikes!

So what happens if I brighten the henna with chamomile tea?  Will it make me orange?  I read somewhere on the net to use green tea for light brown/blonde and coffee for dark hair.???
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, January 22, 2006, 3:51pm; Reply: 56
Quoted from Victoria
If you decide to go with an actual dye instead of henna, those are available in good natural foods stores.  I am sure that those cover grey.  But why don't you start with henna as long as you don't have much grey.  

Henna is not considered a dye.  It is a cellophane type of plant material that coats each hair shaft with either a neutral or a colored layer.  It takes a few weeks to gradually wear off.  It does not penetrate the hair like dye does.  It is not damaging to hair like repeated dying is.

My daughter and I do our own henna.  Several of our natural foods stores sell it in bulk, so we can scoop out as much as we want.  It is cheaper than the pre-packaged.  Although you can buy boxes of henna if you'd rather.  It's not hard to do, just a little messy.  If you decide to do it yourself, let me know and I'll walk you through it.  :-)

How long is your hair, and what color is it?


My hair is shoulder length, but getting thin.  The agony of getting old.   :-/  It is medium brown with reddish highlights.  By the end of summer, it is light brown.  I didn't ask my hairdresser about henna.  I don't do perms.  My hair is straight, which is fine with me.  :)
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, January 22, 2006, 5:23pm; Reply: 57
Quoted from slyparrot
My hairdresser refuses to use henna and says it's horrible.  She said one of her client's hair melted off with the rollers after a perm because there was henna in the hair.  Henna is tricky with chemicals.  

I have called a few places in the yellow pages and no one does henna!  I wanted to get henna highlights with the foil thing.  My hair is med brown in the winter and light brown in the summer.  I just purchased light brown by Light Mountain.  Ever use it?  Maybe I'll be brave and try to do this in a couple of days.  One of the web sites had people saying their hair turned bright orangy red after the 1st application but corrected after the 2nd application.  Yikes!

So what happens if I brighten the henna with chamomile tea?  Will it make me orange?  I read somewhere on the net to use green tea for light brown/blonde and coffee for dark hair.???


I haven't used Light Mountain.  Is it Henna, or natural dye?

Those are really some horror stories, and I can't blame you for being cautious.  Most of us have messed up our hair in one way or another during our lives, and are not eager to do it again!  My experience with henna has been nothing but great.  But I don't have color treated, bleached or permed hair.  
I agree that mixing henna with chemically treated hair is a risk.  For example, if henna is used over bleached hair, some strange color could result.  Henna is like a natural cellophane.  It plates the hair and the henna color stays on the surface of the hair shaft, much like a tinted lip gloss.  It does not penetrate the hair.

One thing to keep in mind is that you can start with neutral henna, or match the color to your own hair to minimize the uncertainty.  There are some wild colors available, and some folks use copper henna, which is like a new penny.  There are colors like burgundy.  These are not for the faint of heart!  :-)  But fun 8)

I think light brown henna would look good, and chamomile tea would only be a subtle golden highlight, not orange.
Check out these two companies.  These are the ones I use:
http://www.rainbowresearch.com/html/henna.htm

http://www.uncleharrys.com/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=UHNP&Category_Code=HI-53
Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, January 23, 2006, 7:54am; Reply: 58
Good websites!  It looks like the same thing in a different package.  Does henna stink?  I was surprised to see henna incense after reading about how it stinks.

My hair is natural.....no color or perms.  I also read that adding heat to henna will bring out red tones.  What do you use to apply it with?  A paintbrush?

Back in college, I wanted to darken my hair from standard blonde to dirty blonde.  The change made my hair green!  The hairdressers had to bleach it vixon blonde to get the green out and even then the ends would start to turn green as it grew out which demanded frequent haircuts.  That was my only mess up and it was a good one.  Like you said, we are not eager to mess it up again!
Posted by: Patty Lee, Monday, January 23, 2006, 3:06pm; Reply: 59
I've used Naturtint.  It isn't a henna.  Henna is healthy, but messy and it does interact with other chemicals and can go just a little green.  

Naturtint works just like a regular OTC hair color.  I've used the dark brown (chestnut, maybe?):  the dark brown is really dark at first, but it's great and natural looking, and it fades so nicely and naturally that I didn't even realize it until 3 months later when I thought "wow, no roots.  When did I do my hair last?"   It is available at my HFS and online.  Green box.  
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, January 23, 2006, 5:04pm; Reply: 60
Quoted from slyparrot
Good websites!  It looks like the same thing in a different package.  Does henna stink?  I was surprised to see henna incense after reading about how it stinks.

My hair is natural.....no color or perms.  I also read that adding heat to henna will bring out red tones.  What do you use to apply it with?  A paintbrush?

Back in college, I wanted to darken my hair from standard blonde to dirty blonde.  The change made my hair green!  The hairdressers had to bleach it vixon blonde to get the green out and even then the ends would start to turn green as it grew out which demanded frequent haircuts.  That was my only mess up and it was a good one.  Like you said, we are not eager to mess it up again!


Henna incense!    :-/  :o   I agree with you!  It's kinda stinky, but in a natural herby sort of way.  It doesn't offend me the way chemical hair treatments do, but I wouldn't want to wear it as a perfume.

I don't know about the heat bringing out red tones.  I've read that heat will make it work faster.  I just cover with an old shower cap and a heavy towel and leave it for an hour or so.

I use those cheap, clear plastic gloves and do all the application with my hands.  Just scoop it up and glob it on.  It's very sensual!   ;D

Posted by: Victoria, Monday, January 23, 2006, 5:07pm; Reply: 61
Quoted from plhartless
I've used Naturtint.  It isn't a henna.  Henna is healthy, but messy and it does interact with other chemicals and can go just a little green.  

Naturtint works just like a regular OTC hair color.  I've used the dark brown (chestnut, maybe?):  the dark brown is really dark at first, but it's great and natural looking, and it fades so nicely and naturally that I didn't even realize it until 3 months later when I thought "wow, no roots.  When did I do my hair last?"   It is available at my HFS and online.  Green box.  


Sounds like a good choice.  We're fortunate to have other, less toxic options, if we want to tweak our hair color.  It's fun, and one of the few things we can change instantly!  Everything else takes time.   ;)
Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, January 23, 2006, 9:21pm; Reply: 62
While shopping at WF for bees wax for my lips, I found Egyptian Magic.  It is an all purpose skin and hair cream.  Use it everywhere.  Good stuff!  The ingredients are:  Olive oil, bees wax, honey bee pollen, royal jelly and bee propolis.

Gonna try those french soaps soon!  

Henna bound.....later!
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, January 24, 2006, 4:13am; Reply: 63
Sounds yummy!  That's the kind of stuff that can't do anybody any harm.
Posted by: Patty Lee, Tuesday, January 24, 2006, 11:26pm; Reply: 64
Wow:  looks like we should be eating your hair cream, slyparrot!  Fantastic!
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, January 25, 2006, 12:01am; Reply: 65
I think that's the idea, when choosing skin care products.  
Not that we have to eat it, but if we Would Not Put It Into Our Stomachs, it probably has no business on our skin!
Posted by: jillthepilllady, Wednesday, January 25, 2006, 1:18am; Reply: 66
What a wonderful post.  I had my hair highlighted with a cap last November.  They didn't get real close to the roots then so by now it has really grown out.  Not to mention, they went way lighter with way more hair than I wanted.  So now I'm thinking no matter what I do is only going to make the already highlighted parts look even lighter unless someone paints in just the roots.  But after reading this, I think I should let it grow out and try some henna.  Does it all have to be grown out or cut off?  my hair is almost shoulder length and is a light-medium brown with a little auburn cast to it and some lighter brown highlights.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, January 25, 2006, 2:01am; Reply: 67
My answer is a cautious NO.  Cautious, because I don't want to mis-guide you and have another unhappy head of hair.  But I'll just tell you a bit about my 21 year old daughter.  She has waist-length dark blonde/rich brown with slight auburn highlights in the sun.

In 6th grade, she bleached her hair repeatedly with peroxide, out of the bottle, and hung out in the sun until her hair was blonde straw!  :-)

Then a few months after that process lost it's appeal to her, we went to a good salon, and had her hair trimmed several inches, deeply conditioned and dyed to her natural color with a good quality professional dye.  That worked just fine, and her hair looked a lot better.

THEN, a few months later, the roots were growing out, and the dye was fading and the result was a rather strange mixture of dark and light.  We couldn't afford the salon again, so we bought auburn dye at the super-market.  It looked fairly decent................the first time.

After several months and several more applications, the result was almost waist length, brassy fake auburn with brassy undertones and a distinct return to the straw texture once again.

She stopped the entire process finally, had her hair trimmed several inches once again, and we just let it sit for a few months.  From the back, you could see bands of color, bleach and natural, in that order, with varying degrees of straw to healthy gloss.  

Then, we dived in with the Henna in a mixture of brown/black/auburn.  It was stunning!  It calmed down the frizz, gave even the damaged part somewhat of a shine and evened out the color without really dying it.

I think the key was that we waited several months before putting the Henna over the treated hair.  Now, we are a couple of more years down the road, with regular trims, Aubrey shampoo and conditioners and (now) Natural uncolored Henna.  Her hair is beginning to shine with a uniform natural color again.  The henna definately made it possible for her to survive the long period of growing out all those experiments.  
Posted by: slyparrot, Thursday, January 26, 2006, 12:13pm; Reply: 68
Be careful Jil!

I just had my first henna experience!  The smell was not bad at all.  Kind of messy.  The color isn't that noticable.  I'm guessing it's because the light brown henna is close to my light brown hair!  There are some slight red tones and the texture is silky.  And I did not leave it on for an hour either.  About 20-30 minutes.  My tea kettle is metal so I just used hot shower water.

Has anyone tried hennalucent?  I purchased 4 boxes and looked it up when I got home.  They have some chemicals mixed in like the lauryl sulfate stuff but it's still powder and fades after 6 weeks.??  Should I trash it?

Has anyone heard of henna turning the hair green?
Posted by: slyparrot, Thursday, January 26, 2006, 2:32pm; Reply: 69
Check out the henna color mixes!

http://www.hennaforhair.com/mixes/index.html
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, January 26, 2006, 4:22pm; Reply: 70
Quoted from slyparrot


Has anyone heard of henna turning the hair green?



It seems like I remember a few people having problems if the henna is applied to hair that has been very recently bleached or chemically dyed.  I believe the weird color comes from the interaction with chemicals that are still on the hair, and not from the color of the hair itself.
Posted by: slyparrot, Friday, January 27, 2006, 12:12am; Reply: 71
That's a relief.  Why does metal effect henna?  I don't have a coffee maker and all my cookware is stainless steel.  


Back to aubrey organics, coconut oil is in my soap and does not bother me so it must be another ingredient.  It definately makes me itch really bad anywhere it touches me.


No reactions to henna!  Hip Hip Hurray!
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, January 27, 2006, 12:50am; Reply: 72
Regarding metal and henna, I really have a feeling they are talking about metals like aluminum, copper, or some other reactive metal.  I always use the hot water from my tap and mix it in a stainless steel mixing bowl, and I've had no bad surprises at all.

Sometimes I'll make a strong chamomile tea since I like the golden highlights.  I heat that water in my stainless steel teapot, make the tea in a pyrex measuring cup, and then strain that into the stainless steel mixing bowl as part of the liquid to mix the henna.

By the way, which aubrey shampoo are you using?
Posted by: slyparrot, Friday, March 24, 2006, 9:41am; Reply: 73
Okay!  Most of us know how consuming olive oil makes your skin soft...........I found out that eating avacados (homemade guacamole) makes my skin even softer, like silky feathers!  Avacados are not ben/neu for everyone, but if you can eat them give it a try!  I dipped raw carrots, broccoli and celery in it.
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Friday, March 24, 2006, 12:14pm; Reply: 74
Great thread with loads of advices.. thanks!!

What I must do to keep my skin soft, and smooth is taking my Flaxseedoil in my MFC every day... If not, for 1 week, my skin gets dry and itchy..

Veggly is also awesome!! I add 1 drop to my bodylotion and foot and handcreme..
Never had such great results!

For my hair I use a dark/red hair shampoo and conditioner and some Gliss HairRepair,  and then... don't be shocked :o :o I have shaving foam (Vergulde Hand, a dutch brand) and dip it on my hair... Okay then I dry my hair. Next step is
I spray some HairShine on it. Then I apply only some Woolgrease of Dr. Vogel on my hair.. This gives the hair the shine you need!!! ;D ;D
Only wash my hair 2x a week..

Before I wash my hair I lotion my hair with some alcohol with herbs and brush (in fact rub my scalp firmly!!) until it starts 'hurting', and my scalp is rosyred glowing .. Then I stop..  ::) After that I follow the above procedure..

Maybe a Spartan hairtreatment, the rubbing and brushing, but it works for me very well.. The skin gets clean of deadcells and bloodflow in my scalpskin is increased..
It feels awesome afterwards..

I will print these great advices in this thread!! ;D

See'ya

Cocky 8)


Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 24, 2006, 6:05pm; Reply: 75
I'm glad this thread popped back up again.

Slyparrot, Too bad I can't eat avocados, although I used to love them will all the other avoids I used to eat!  I used to also make a facial out of mashed avocado, honey and yogurt.  
After cleaning face, hold a hot, wet washcloth on the face for a little while, and then spread avo mixture on face.  Leave for as long as you can stand it, and then wash off.  It was pretty good, if I remember correctly.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 24, 2006, 6:11pm; Reply: 76
Great system, Cocky.  I don't know any of those products you mentioned, so it's kind of hard for me to translate into how I could do it, but I did understand the SHAVING CREAM :-) !  I'll bet you have beautiful hair.  The alcohol is confusing.  Isn't it drying?  I think it would be nice to have something to massage into scalp before shampooing that would kill yeasts; does the alcohol do that?

Here's something I have to share.  I have starting cleaning my face with Jojoba Oil.  I remember back in the 70's when it came into the natural foods stores, it was advertised to remove eye make up.  So I thought, why not try it as a full face cleaner.  So what I do is gently massage it into my face morning and night.  Then apply a hot, wet face cloth to my face for a minute, and then I use the same cloth to gently wash off the jojoba oil.  It's the only thing I've used to clean my face with for the past month, and my skin has never felt softer and cleaner.  
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Friday, March 24, 2006, 7:00pm; Reply: 77
Hey Victoria!

Well the lotion is ready available in the drugstore! I use it to brush my hair easily. Without the lotion the brush won't go through my hair.. :'(
Besides I wash it right after this treatment.
Yes, this shaving foam is the ONLY shaving foam that won't get sticky when applied.. And.. it is soo much cheaper than the other stylers..  ;D

You say jojoba-oil? You make it yourself, or buy it?  I will give it a try..
But the veggly is THE invention of the century to keep the skin moist and smooth ;D

Cocky 8)
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 24, 2006, 7:10pm; Reply: 78
Cocky,
I buy Jojoba in bottle form in the health foods stores.  
Veggly is an interesting substance.  What I've heard about it is that it holds moisture, so from that perspective, it would be good to use right after washing the skin, while there is still moisture on the skin.  

Your hair sounds like the exact opposite of mine!!  My hair is so baby fine and silky that if I hold up one of my hairs, it is complely invisible.  It takes about 5 of my hairs to look like one of my daughters' (who is 1/2 southern Italian).  My hair is straight and I use Henna containing shampoos and conditioners to give my hair some weight and give it lots of shine.  
Posted by: jayney-O (Guest), Friday, March 24, 2006, 7:25pm; Reply: 79
hmmmmm, Victoria, you have hair like mine....I was wondering what to do with mine as it short and I fear the henna would tend toward flattening it. If it were long, it might be nicer....I am about to try something natural, don't know what as I have had it (what do they call it now...not frosted, not tipped, but....whatever)...I like to go lighter, but can't really do naturally.....
so still pondering and thankful forr your ideas....tho I just popped into this thread....
Posted by: Drea, Friday, March 24, 2006, 7:51pm; Reply: 80
Quoted from jayney-O
hmmmmm, Victoria, you have hair like mine....I was wondering what to do with mine as it short and I fear the henna would tend toward flattening it. If it were long, it might be nicer....I am about to try something natural, don't know what as I have had it (what do they call it now...not frosted, not tipped, but....whatever)...I like to go lighter, but can't really do naturally.....
so still pondering and thankful forr your ideas....tho I just popped into this thread....

My hair is fine, but I have a lot of it. After shampooing, I've been rinsing my hair with a mix of apple cider vinegar to water (ratio of 1:5), and it really brings out the body and shine! I do it once per week. Make sure to rinse it out really well, though.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 24, 2006, 9:18pm; Reply: 81
JayneyO,
do you have any experience with henna?  I don't think it would flatten your hair.  To the contrary, it has been the best thing that I've ever found for my hair.  It gives it body and keeps it from being fly-away, without being too extreme in any direction.  I have used actual Henna for at least a decade, but for the last couple of years, I have been contented with the shampoo/conditioners I use.  I did a LOT of experimenting, and have found three shampoos that I kind of mix and alternate.  Also, with the conditioners, I mix two.  If you want the names, let me know.

Drea,
I love Apple Cider Vinegar rinses.  Thanks for that reminder.  I used to use it in the 70's, and I remember it was very good for the scalp!
Posted by: RedLilac, Friday, March 24, 2006, 11:38pm; Reply: 82
Quoted from Victoria

Here's something I have to share.  I have starting cleaning my face with Jojoba Oil.  I remember back in the 70's when it came into the natural foods stores, it was advertised to remove eye make up.  So I thought, why not try it as a full face cleaner.  So what I do is gently massage it into my face morning and night.  Then apply a hot, wet face cloth to my face for a minute, and then I use the same cloth to gently wash off the jojoba oil.  It's the only thing I've used to clean my face with for the past month, and my skin has never felt softer and cleaner.  


Winter this year has really dried out my skin.  I rub Jojoba Oil in my hair, on my face, hands, and feet then go to sleep.

Posted by: Colleen, Saturday, March 25, 2006, 2:45am; Reply: 83
WOW !!  What a lot of great ideas !!

I have crepe-y skin on my inner arms and I thought it was due to ageing and no hope of improvements but now I'm wondering if some of what y'all suggested might help.  I used to make soap and will do so again one day when I have the time but meanwhile I have all these supplies that I'm tossing as they will be or are too old to be useful.  I just dug into one trash box and pulled out a bottle of veggie glycerine to start mixing with other ingredients to moisturize my arms.  Maybe I'll come up with a super duper wrinkle defence cream!

I'm also going to add EVOO to my morning smoothie !!  Heck !  I could look like a teenager if all these ideas work !!

Seriously, this has been such interesting reading and I really did dig into a box of stuff I was trashing to find the glycerine.

I used henna years ago and so did my roommate who was then in her late 50's and going grey.  It gave her highlights, covered up the grey in a lighter shade than her natural hair colour.  I liked how it made my hair shine!
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Saturday, March 25, 2006, 12:23pm; Reply: 84
Quoted from outdoordrea

My hair is fine, but I have a lot of it. After shampooing, I've been rinsing my hair with a mix of apple cider vinegar to water (ratio of 1:5), and it really brings out the body and shine! I do it once per week. Make sure to rinse it out really well, though.


Hey Drea, great idea!!  ;D  Well, as long as I don't drink the vinegar, there is nothing wrong with vinegar!!  ;D

The creme I put in my hair (as much as a pea big!) is calle Bioforce of Dr. Vogel.
It is made of the grease that sheep have in their furs.) Awesome stuff!!

I also used this cream on my breasts and nipples when nursing my kids.. (long time ago ::), No problem for the baby when 'eating' this cream.. ;)
Kept my skin there smooth and whole and not red and irritated when those hungry babies came along ;)
This creme is always in my bathroom...

To keep my skin smooth winter and summer is FLAXSEEDOIL every day 1 tablespoon!
That is vital for me to keep my skin from getting flaky and dry and itchy, and besides Flaxoil has the ultimate balanced contents of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids!!

Adhering to the diet back in 1999, after 3 months, the goosy-bump skin on my upperarms just vanished!!! I did not even notice it, until someone on the Message board then, told us what happened to her upperarms.. Then.. I realized same had happened to me..  ;D That was awesome!!
And all of my dry skinproblems, cellulite diminished and/or disappeared. Even the fat on thighs and backpart :o changed.. sounds weird, but it sort of melted, felt softer somehow since on the diet..
Especially in the beginning of the diet I had huge changes in and on my body..

Anyway, I just loooove this BTD!!!! No other diet, no other Dr. , not even a million dollars can change my way of life!!! No way!!!  I am a BTD-addict for life!! :K)

Cocky 8)


Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 1:33am; Reply: 85
Beautiful post, Cocky!  :-)
Posted by: slyparrot, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 8:51am; Reply: 86
----quote from cocky----
Adhering to the diet back in 1999, after 3 months, the goosy-bump skin on my upperarms just vanished!!! I did not even notice it, until someone on the Message board then, told us what happened to her upperarms.. Then.. I realized same had happened to me..  ;D That was awesome!!

And all of my dry skinproblems, cellulite diminished and/or disappeared. Even the fat on thighs and backpart :o changed.. sounds weird, but it sort of melted, felt softer somehow since on the diet..
----end of quote----

I have bumps on my upper arms that never went away!  What is it?

This is the first time in my life that the fat on my back, neck and upperchest area and upper arms have been slim.  
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Sunday, March 26, 2006, 9:39am; Reply: 87
Quoted from slyparrot

I have bumps on my upper arms that never went away!  What is it?


You could massage the spots on your arms with some oil, to increase bloodtransport in that area..  
I am an A, and the bumps were gone in 3 months on the diet..

I think sauna will be great for you as well..

Take care

Cocky 8)

Posted by: Bethysue, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 1:30pm; Reply: 88
I have those weird bumps too! They reapeared when I got pregnant......Could it maybe have something to do with falling off the wagon & eating junk for my first 3 months???? :P
So what is the solution? Dry brushing? Grapeseed oil??? ??)
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 8:06pm; Reply: 89
This may not relate to either of you with the little bumps, but mine went away when I stopped eating corn products.
Posted by: Whimsical, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 8:16pm; Reply: 90
My arm bumps got much better when I started the diet, but are dependent on the amount of grains (even compliant ones) that I eat and SUGAR for sure.  Once I cut out all sugar, they pretty much disappeared.  Dry brushing, taking lecithin, and drinking lots of water have eliminated them completely.
Posted by: Whimsical, Sunday, March 26, 2006, 8:20pm; Reply: 91
Apparently these bumps are called Keratosis Pilaris, here is a website.

The website has a "Helpful Hints" section, but this mentions nothing about diet, which we, of course, know is the number one factor in what goes on with your skin.  Diet (plus body brushing) is the ONLY thing that has been able to eliminate these for me.  


Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, March 27, 2006, 3:31am; Reply: 92
My bumps are clear, not zit looking.  No puss.  Sometimes they itch, sometimes they do not.  On rare occasions, a few may be pale pink.  They are smaller on this diet but never completely went away.  I suspect gluten for now.  It amazes me how common it is.
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, March 27, 2006, 4:26am; Reply: 93
I'll just bettcha they're grain related in some way.
Posted by: 547 (Guest), Monday, March 27, 2006, 8:48am; Reply: 94
Quoted from Whimsical
Apparently these bumps are called Keratosis Pilaris, here is a website.


That is exactly the case! Keratosis Pilaris. Well, we have the BTD and that is the best way to make them disappear!!

Great website that KP one! :)

Cocky 8)
Posted by: 877 (Guest), Thursday, April 6, 2006, 10:48pm; Reply: 95
Dont know about skin or lips but for the hair you could try Giovanni Products from your local health food store.
I use the 50:50 Balanced Shampoo and it has done wonders for my scalp. Use to have really bad dandruff and itching on and on, This stuff got rid of 98% of my problems. all other shampoos just made it worse.
Posted by: slyparrot, Monday, April 17, 2006, 3:04pm; Reply: 96
I will probably try the Giovanni Products next round.  The 50 dollars I spent on the Aubrey Products was a big waste since all it does is make me itch.  The bottles are collecting dust now.
Posted by: NewHampshireGirl, Monday, April 17, 2006, 3:30pm; Reply: 97
I have finally found a face cream that I'm crazy about and shall order more when the time comes.   I think my jar will last a long time because a little bit cream goes a long way.  It's definitely good for mature skin.  ;)

Here is the link:  http://www.softecare.com
Posted by: NewHampshireGirl, Monday, April 17, 2006, 3:32pm; Reply: 98
Oops, I forgot!   The name of the face cream is Callisto.   :)
Posted by: 1121 (Guest), Friday, July 13, 2007, 4:55pm; Reply: 99
I had gallbladder surgery 6yrs ago and the medicine for surgery made a lot of my hair fall out especially on top of head. It never has gone back to normal. I read that scalp massages would help. What would be the suggestion for getting my normal hair back. I have a lot of hair but it is very thin hair. I also have those little bumps all over my arms. I suspected dry skin, but over the counter lotions never helped much. I will try the jojoba oil. Does your hair smell bad after you use the vinegar rinse? This forum is so helpful. I can not wait to see all the benefits from the BTD.
Posted by: Debra+, Friday, July 13, 2007, 5:13pm; Reply: 100
Valerie...I used to get the little bumps on the back of my arms, but since
BTD, silicea powder, O exercise (makes your sking glisten from all the sweating) and body brushing...http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b=alttreat,m=1103603360  they have all gone away. ;)

Debra :)
Posted by: Drea, Friday, July 13, 2007, 7:38pm; Reply: 101
Quoted from Valerie
I also have those little bumps all over my arms. I suspected dry skin, but over the counter lotions never helped much. I will try the jojoba oil.

My new favorite skin softener is pure shea butter. I got really dry skin last week (what with too much sun, soaking in mud, and not showering for several days), on my upper arms. After a few applications of shea butter, they are all better.

Quoted from Valerie
Does your hair smell bad after you use the vinegar rinse?

Trough trial and error, I've found that if I dilute the apple cider vinegar with water, 1:4 (that's one part acv to 4 parts water), my head doed not smell like vinegar...
Posted by: 1121 (Guest), Friday, July 13, 2007, 10:59pm; Reply: 102
Thank-You Debra+ and Drea, I will try to find the silicia powder and definetely start walking, and I will try the apple cider vinegar. I will have my daughter try it also. She is always buying shiner stuff. lol I have heard of shea butter. Thanks again.
Posted by: marmalade, Saturday, September 20, 2008, 2:51pm; Reply: 103
I like the lip balm in a stick from Bert's Bees. It really helps my lips. Hope it helps yours too. I have so many lip balms and I find it is really the only brand to help me.
Posted by: marmalade, Saturday, September 20, 2008, 2:54pm; Reply: 104
Sorry, that should be Burt's Bees. And it is the honey lip balm. The main ingredient is bees wax and I picked it up at the drug store.
Posted by: Still, Friday, October 31, 2008, 12:16am; Reply: 105
As an additional benefit of the silicon powder, it may help prevent Alzheimer's!  One article about the study that was done is here:
http://www.arteryplaque.com/3/A/1/pop3.htm
Posted by: karen, Friday, October 31, 2008, 1:20am; Reply: 106
I read about that benefit also in a different article.  My husband's father and uncle passed away from Alzheimer's so I want to do everything I can to prevent that from happening to him.  It's good to do as many preventative things that we know about.

I think my skin is smoother since taking horsetail, which is a good source of silica.  I originally started to take it because it helps absorb calcium and strengthen bones.
Posted by: +Aan, Sunday, January 4, 2009, 5:55am; Reply: 107
I've been putting the genoma on my lips at night. My bottom lip peels all the time. It seems to help...Aani
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, January 4, 2009, 6:11pm; Reply: 108
For some reason when I opened this tread it popped me back up to the start so I decided to skim the posts for a refresher.  I found a post in this tread I wrote in January 2006.  I had just started to color my hair.  I’ve switched hair dressers 3 times since then.  I’ve come a long way baby.  I sometimes use Jojoba oil on my hair and this tread must be where I got the idea.
Posted by: 4283 (Guest), Sunday, January 4, 2009, 9:14pm; Reply: 109
Hi there Red, I remember Jojoba oil was wonderful for my DH's hair (The shampoo I used to be able to buy - Mill creek I think :-/ had  a little bottle with it to use as conditioner) must get some more... :)
Posted by: slyparrot, Wednesday, January 14, 2009, 12:44pm; Reply: 110
Boy-Howdy!  I have not been on this thread in a long time and did not go back to skim thru it like RedLilac. Anywho, some of my hair problems (itchy head, bumps, residue, frizz) were from using hair products that contained gluten. Gluten free shampoo/conditioner has made my hairy scalp much better. Okay, maybe being on a better diet helped too!   :)
Posted by: expe4, Wednesday, January 14, 2009, 7:25pm; Reply: 111
Nutritional yeast flakes everyday...? Great on hair, nails and skin!
Posted by: 4283 (Guest), Wednesday, January 14, 2009, 9:30pm; Reply: 112
Quoted from slyparrot
Boy-Howdy!  I have not been on this thread in a long time and did not go back to skim thru it like RedLilac. Anywho, some of my hair problems (itchy head, bumps, residue, frizz) were from using hair products that contained gluten. Gluten free shampoo/conditioner has made my hairy scalp much better. Okay, maybe being on a better diet helped too!   :)


I didn't even know they put that in shampoo???  ??) I bought a brand once that had "human keritin" in it... It seemed to be good for my hair (back then) Wonder if it would be compliant? :-/
Posted by: christaalyssaA+, Friday, April 30, 2010, 11:59pm; Reply: 113
Wouldn't being a secretor or non secretor effect the use of "avoid" items? I am an A so I can use Aloe Vera, but I am also a Warrior and it says that I can't use aloe. I have a huge bottle of it and plan to use it on my hair and skin as I "feel" this is the best use for it.

Our skin does absorb the things that we put on it. It is the largest organ that we have. So really should we all just stop putting things on our skin that are avoids also?
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, May 1, 2010, 12:27am; Reply: 114
it is entirely up to your issues or intolerance to any item

at least topical doesn t go through the digestive tract which is what ER is all about.....topical avoids are definitely a very personal matter.
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