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Cooling Spices for Pitta -- Explorers and Others
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san j
Tuesday, January 3, 2017, 7:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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An Explorer friend raises the question on another thread as to how to spice up bland food, where Pitta is the predominant dosha. I don't have the GenoType book in front of me at the moment, so I'm not remembering what's Neutral/Benef. for y'all, but
I think it behooves Explorers, or all those with high Pitta, to take a look at a list of Pitta-calming herbs and spices and use (or try) those. Fresh (NOT dried) ginger is an example of an excellent aromatic for Pitta - they also do well with mint, fennel seed, cumin, and many more.

Quoted Text
pitta pacifying spices like cumin, neem leaves, saffron, and turmeric....
basil, coriander, dill, fennel, parsley, and turmeric...
cooling herbs and spices (cilantro, coriander, cumin, fennel, mint, etc.).
Source:https://www.banyanbotanicals.com/info/ayurvedic-living/living-ayurveda/diet/pitta-pacifying-diet/
Another list:
Quoted Text
Basil (fresh)
Black Pepper (small amounts)
Cardamom
Cinnamon (small amounts)
Coriander (seeds or powder)
Cumin (seeds or powder)
Dill
Fennel
Ginger (fresh)
Mint
Neem Leaves
Orange Peel
Parsley
Peppermint
Saffron
Spearmint
Tarragon
Turmeric
Vanilla
Wintergreen
Source:https://www.banyanbotanicals.com/info/ayurvedic-living/living-ayurveda/diet/pitta-pacifying-foods/

Chopra calls cumin too hot for Pitta, but most say otherwise. I see it in many respected Ayurvedic recipes so it should be fine in moderation unless you find it otherwise or it SWAMI's Avoid for you.
Also note that many recipes counsel Pitta to toss a bunch of chopped cilantro on a finished dish to make it Pitta-friendly.

In general:
Where the various lists disagree with each other, consider "black dot" and give 'em the Individuality-test!  

Spices, after organ meats, are considered the second most "nutrient-dense" food. Using spices is a fine art and a science. Get a degree in that!


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Easy E
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I only in the past months realized how beneficial spices can be with foods.  It is a great way to get nutrients.  This is something I completely overlooked before.

I am mainly an explorer higher pitta type, but seem to get benefits from things like peppers and dry ginger and the like in small amounts along with using the above spices you posted.  It is definitely an art form!
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san j
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Spent a couple of minutes at Amazon - there are books on Cooking with Herbs and Spices - these'd be fun to WRITE. And definitely fun to try the recipes.
Easy E - with your Supplement hobby, this may just be the Next Level for you. Starting with herbal Ghees and tonics -- and on from there!  
Definitely more wonderful than capsules, tablets and drops.


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not a fan of cumin at all and I'm a pitta type (ther's also pita bread )...


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Easy E
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I like cumin!  I never tried a number of the spices posted above.  I do not like dill much.  
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Mother
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Sage, oregano and rosemary are my most used herbs but I am vata dominant.

I like dill better in warmer months on a cold salad. . Kind of turns me off in the colder months.

I love tarragon on shrimp.  Cilantro on almost anything
Coriander and cumin not so much

I love spicy peppers but I can only eat them on occcasion or I get achy.  

Good reminder how medicinal herbs and spices can be ON my food.

I generally buy fresh organic herbs, rinse and grind them then freeze in small jars. Then I have a pinch of this or that ready to go at all times .  Tastes so much better than dried.


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Quoted from Mother
Sage, oregano and rosemary are my most used herbs but I am vata dominant.

I like dill better in warmer months on a cold salad. . Kind of turns me off in the colder months.

I love tarragon on shrimp.  Cilantro on almost anything
Coriander and cumin not so much

I love spicy peppers but I can only eat them on occcasion or I get achy.  

Good reminder how medicinal herbs and spices can be ON my food.

I generally buy fresh organic herbs, rinse and grind them then freeze in small jars. Then I have a pinch of this or that ready to go at all times .  Tastes so much better than dried.


I find that hot peppers cause achiness in me also after extended consumption, and i also love the flavor of them.  It is a nightshade.  Dried ginger does not cause any aches for me, however too much makes my skin feel dry and itchy if using a lot over a few days (prob sounds weird).  I love cilantro and fennel.

Black pepper i do like, but it is an avoid for most people apparently.  I have some roasted sunflower seeds with black pepper and sea salt right now that are good.  I may try to roast my own with various spices sometime soon.

I am pitta dominant, but have notable traits of all 3 doshas.  Prob a close tie between vata and kapha.

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Mother
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Easy E,

I could eat spicy food everyday all day. For awhile I had to stay away from all nightshades but now I can eat spicy a few times a week with no ill effects. I will trade bell peppers and tomatoes for spicy anyway.  I just don't eat potato or egglplant anyway.

Funny about your sunflower seeds. I make spicy roasted pumpkin seeds. Some jalape├▒o powder, garlic and onion powder, red pepper flakes and some Cajun seasoning and sea salt. I coat them with a little garlic oil and add spices and roast until they brown a bit. VERY addicting. My brother makes me send them to him all the time. Expensive to ship seeds lol. I sent him all the spices and told him how to make them but he says they aren't the same as mine.  Unfortunately I never use recipes. Just a shake of this or that until I like it. I have made herb roasted seeds and they are great too. I actually like them with just sea salt as well. Nice variety.

I made an outstanding mushroom gravy for thanksgiving with no starches or thickeners.  Just mushrooms as the thickener, garlic oil, onion, broth, oregano and sage and sea salt. It took an entire martini to get it right but it's right.  No idea of the proportions as I was adding and tasting until I got the right consitency and flavor. It was fun though. Now I have a very low carb amazing gravy that is great on a variety of protein. We were eating it off a spoon!

Ginger and I don't get along though I love it. It makes me hungry!! Weird

I love black pepper too. Is t there something about it being ok if it's freshly ground as the mold content in preground is much higher??


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san j
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Great ways to get those herbs and spices without having to think about it often:
Make Herb Butters, Herb Ghees, Herb oils, Herb Vinegars, Herb sprinkles mixed with salt and/or seeds. Keep 'em on hand.
There are even pre-mixed blends/masalas/churnas (available through Amazon!) for each dosha. A couple of the pre-blended Pitta Churnas have a touch of cane sugar in them, however, so if you want to try a churna, make sure you choose one of the many that contain just the herbs and spices.
In fact, trying a few of these might help you to decide which flavors are most needed/liked by you. Some contain rose petals or mint, for instance, and your body may surprise you by awakening to those flavors.

Onions and garlic (as well as "heat") are to be used only sparingly by the Pitta.
Another hint: Pitta's cooling herbs are so powerful that they can counteract the Pitta-aggravating effects of accompanying foods. If a dish is too spicy or heating/irritating, the generous use of cooling herbs/spices can to an extent reverse the effects. Cuisines that feature Cilantro, for instance, tend to be rather spicy, and the Cilantro is used to cool down the dishes.
Why do you think carminative spices are used to quell/prevent indigestion?
Many in India chew on Fennel Seeds, or sweetened cumin seeds, after a meal.
So if you don't want to use these flavors in your cooking, you can anyway use the seeds afterward. You'll often notice a plate of seeds on a pedestal or credenza as you depart from an Indian restaurant, just as in some other restaurants you'll see a peppermint (another nice tummy-cooler) sweet.


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Dianne
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San J - Great idea about putting herbs in the ghee! I never thought of that and I do make my own in quantity. I was just mentioning to my husband how it's almost time to buy fresh ginger for me to juice. I ran out at the beginning of December and it's been so busy that I could not fit it in.  I make enough last four months and freeze it; that way I only have to do it three times yearly. I add Vit. C powder to it so that it does not oxidize. I freeze it in individual containers of which one lasts me one full week. I enjoy it in my kombucha.

So timely that I go to the forum and ginger is mentioned. It's great for the spleen and many other things as well!  
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san j
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Quoted from Dianne
San J - Great idea about putting herbs in the ghee! I never thought of that and I do make my own in quantity. I was just mentioning to my husband how it's almost time to buy fresh ginger for me to juice. I ran out at the beginning of December and it's been so busy that I could not fit it in.  I make enough last four months and freeze it; that way I only have to do it three times yearly. I add Vit. C powder to it so that it does not oxidize. I freeze it in individual containers of which one lasts me one full week. I enjoy it in my kombucha.

So timely that I go to the forum and ginger is mentioned. It's great for the spleen and many other things as well!  

The Ayurvedes call it "Medicated Ghee", seeing as they use herbs/spices as both Food and Medicine at the same time! Different members of the family may have their own jar(s) of Ghee in the kitchen, depending upon what they're needing/working on.  



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Just wanted to pop in and like this excellent  thread...
...sorry have not much to add that hasn't already been said...
...but all very interesting for us 'hotties'...it definitely works ­čÖé
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Would one heat the ghee and then add the spices/herbs in a pan or something and then let it all cool together?  I just recently have tried ghee.  I usually use a bit to cook rice or pan cook things, which is my favorite way of cooking.  It is relatively simple and hassle free, and tasty!
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Mother
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When I made herbed compound butter I would use a whole stick of butter but only melted about a tablespoon. Then added herbs, onion or shallots, a little white wine and sauted until the herbs were fragrant. Then I mashed it into the rest of the room temp butter. Then I rolled it either between parchment paper or waxed paper like a cigar. Then froze. I would just slice off a piece when needed. I'm sure you could do the same with ghee but for me, ghee needs salt but that could be added directly to the food.  

I used to make a compound butter as described above with oregano and sage, shallots and white wine and stuffed it under the skin of my turkeys. Made for a lovely gravy.


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Quoted from Mother
When I made herbed compound butter I would use a whole stick of butter but only melted about a tablespoon. Then added herbs, onion or shallots, a little white wine and sauted until the herbs were fragrant. Then I mashed it into the rest of the room temp butter. Then I rolled it either between parchment paper or waxed paper like a cigar. Then froze. I would just slice off a piece when needed. I'm sure you could do the same with ghee but for me, ghee needs salt but that could be added directly to the food.  

I used to make a compound butter as described above with oregano and sage, shallots and white wine and stuffed it under the skin of my turkeys. Made for a lovely gravy.


Sounds yummy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



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Sirach 37:27
For not every food is good for everyone, nor is everything suited to every taste.



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san j
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Google yields this example, Easy E, of medicated ghee recipes/preparation technique.
http://www.homemademommy.net/2.....ence-chile-ghee.html
May it help. Have fun in your laboratory!


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san j
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PS. Just to show you how Ayurvedes take their medicine.
http://svasthaayurveda.com/triphala-ghrita/
Ghee, because of its unique short chain profile, is an excellent delivery system for medication, because it facilitates its absorption.  


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san j
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Quoted from Mother
When I made herbed compound butter I would use a whole stick of butter but only melted about a tablespoon. Then added herbs, onion or shallots, a little white wine and sauted until the herbs were fragrant. Then I mashed it into the rest of the room temp butter. Then I rolled it either between parchment paper or waxed paper like a cigar. Then froze. I would just slice off a piece when needed. I'm sure you could do the same with ghee but for me, ghee needs salt but that could be added directly to the food.  

I used to make a compound butter as described above with oregano and sage, shallots and white wine and stuffed it under the skin of my turkeys. Made for a lovely gravy.
Oh, these look yummy, M!

But medicated ghee is another story. The proportions make for a very intense preparation (one that can certainly be "diluted" for culinary use).
Ideally, one can use the medicated ghee as a tea in itself, simply by adding the hot water - that's how strong the herb/spice component! Of course, a milder concentration is fine for some -- but the wine and onions and salt are really rather for general cooking use.  

But, yes, I used to do the compound culinary butters, for sure. Chives in particular  



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Quoted from Mother
Easy E,

I could eat spicy food everyday all day. For awhile I had to stay away from all nightshades but now I can eat spicy a few times a week with no ill effects. I will trade bell peppers and tomatoes for spicy anyway.  I just don't eat potato or egglplant anyway.

Funny about your sunflower seeds. I make spicy roasted pumpkin seeds. Some jalape├▒o powder, garlic and onion powder, red pepper flakes and some Cajun seasoning and sea salt. I coat them with a little garlic oil and add spices and roast until they brown a bit. VERY addicting. My brother makes me send them to him all the time. Expensive to ship seeds lol. I sent him all the spices and told him how to make them but he says they aren't the same as mine.  Unfortunately I never use recipes. Just a shake of this or that until I like it. I have made herb roasted seeds and they are great too. I actually like them with just sea salt as well. Nice variety.

I made an outstanding mushroom gravy for thanksgiving with no starches or thickeners.  Just mushrooms as the thickener, garlic oil, onion, broth, oregano and sage and sea salt. It took an entire martini to get it right but it's right.  No idea of the proportions as I was adding and tasting until I got the right consitency and flavor. It was fun though. Now I have a very low carb amazing gravy that is great on a variety of protein. We were eating it off a spoon!

Ginger and I don't get along though I love it. It makes me hungry!! Weird

I love black pepper too. Is t there something about it being ok if it's freshly ground as the mold content in preground is much higher??


I never consumed high amounts of nightshades on a daily basis, but several trials of consuming peppers in higher amounts for several days causes me stiffness esp. when sitting for a long period, and joint popping in a lot of joints, and muscle tightness, in certain places.  Interestingly, ginger as a spice and licorice root seem to reverse this, restoring effortless and smooth (pop and crack free) mobility and eliminating aching within an hour or so.  These are two beneficials for me bloodtype and/or genotypewise.

It is crazy because peppers in small amounts are very energizing, but they also seem to dull my mind (i feel super relaxed) and with continued consumption make me pop and crack, and feel stiff and achy.  Even my ankles and elbows pop, hips pop, and back cracks when i stretch my hands above my head, etc.!  Ginger does not do this, but it does make me insanely hungry too, and thirsty if i use a good bit.

I'm not sure if other night shades like tomatoes or potatoes do this also.  Ashwagandha i tried several times as a supp. and it also seemed to cause mild aching and some pretty annoying itching esp. at first.  Perhaps i would be wise to minimize nightshade consumption!  Potatoes themselves never seemed to cause me issues.  

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Funny you find that with ginger. I completely do. Peppermint tea has the same effect.

I am much better with spicy peppers than bell peppers.
I used to eat salsa by the gallon, lol. That's when I put two and two together. Probably not good to eat anything by the gallon!!

Potatoes not sure of. Haven't eaten them in eons. They put me right to sleep and turn on the hunger hormones as well as bloat. Probably more of a starch thing for me than nightshade. I do love sweet potatoes more but back to sleep and bloat.


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Bell peppers are generally considered harmless for Pitta.


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That is interesting.   I eat bell peppers on occasion and love them overall.  

I have some dried ancho peppers i bought yestrday to sample, and broke them into pieces over some food.  Some of them were more like Thai peppers, hotter than cayenne, others were more sweet with a small zing.  Maybe pitta aggravating in excess!

I prob wasn't designed to be a chilihead, I just gotta work thru it and accept it.  Part of the btd is learning acceptance and balance!

I think it is possible that a little bit of something could be beneficial or neutral,  but too much can become a poison.  




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Quoted from Easy E
I think it is possible that a little bit of something could be beneficial or neutral,  but too much can become a poison.
It is not only possible; it is established fact. It is the very definition of the word "overdose". Don't you work with drug addicts?



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Quoted from san j
It is not only possible; it is established fact. It is the very definition of the word "overdose". Don't you work with drug addicts?



I do...although many are behind on the notion that one mans food may be another man's poison (I don't think anyone considers heroin, Lortabs or Oxys food though, but could be wrong)!  However, the right amounts of these meds can help someone who may need them (excluding heroin).  

But, i did see that something like Xanax is actually listed as an avoid for the explorer genotype which is interesting.  That is intriguing, because a small amount will cause me to black out (fully awake but do not remember a thing, and behavior is greatly un inhibited).  This was well below what is called  a Z Bar, which is 4 standard Xanax pills.  I also had a similar thing happen when i was a toddler after a surgery, the doctors were floored that i was bouncing off the walls after being given a sedative to put me out!

I think i have an anti addiction mechanism built into my system, i quit smoking cold turkey with no problem at all one day after i started riding my bicycle regularly, it suddenly tasted disgusting and dirty.  I never smoked that much though.

Back to the spices, i think a small amount of cayenne type peppers are actually good for me for digestion and circulation, getting the blood moving, but i read of people that consume high amounts daily with no ill effect at all, in fact it is beneficial for them.  These peppers are prob. more O and B specific, and hunter/gatherer/nomad specific, as Dr. D. writes!  A guy who heads the page cayennepepperinfo.com says he is B+ and uses up to a few tablespoons of cayenne daily.  This would quickly cause me problems!  I read there is a tribal type Asian culture that eats almost nothing but hot peppers and apricots, and they have notable longevity.  They are prob mostly O or B i would guess based on what i know.

I do find the pitta spices helpful that i have tried.  I read that licorice root for example was used in the middle ages to counter the effects of overly spiced foods.  The foods were spiced heavily to conceal the rancid taste of the food eaten i think.  

The world of spices is awesome!

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Love this thread!

Short on time at the moment but interested to see how many of these I like and use. I am a huge fan of herbs and spices in cooking. Interesting that I am Pitta/Kapha/Vata in mostly equal measure, according to all tests I have taken, but definitely in that order. So it is hard for me to try to ise that system in working out my wellness routines. So I just try to stick with my BT/SWAMI protocol. But I am going to copy the contents of this thread for further ref.!!!
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