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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Student – Budget on the O Blood Type Diet
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Student – Budget on the O Blood Type Diet  This thread currently has 2,207 views. Print Print Thread
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TomtypeO
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 1:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I’m looking for student recipes and meal ideas for an O Blood type.
With the staples; lentils, noodles, oats, potatoes, bread, apples & oranges on the avoid list and many of the beneficial or neutral foods; quinoa, almond flour/milk, red meat, nuts, seeds and dried fruit being financially unfeasible for students it is difficult for meal planning and the diet would seem unappealing.
If we look for alternative meal ideas for students it could help encourage a younger generation to better educated in their diet, leading to healthier lifestyles.


The patient was a blood type A. The doctor accidentally recorded down the wrong blood type, it was a "typo".
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deblynn3
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 2:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It's been sometime since I've looked at the book, but I was thinking apples where neutral. There are several beans which are neutral and some that are superfoods, black beans are one, I can think of.

I found that I really spend less money, I don't buy any juck food.  Tell us what you like, lets see what alternatives we can come up with. In the states we have several rice products.

Have you checked up above under online support?  The dropdown "TYPEbase Foodvalues might be helpful.



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ginnyTN
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 2:43am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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To really follow the BTD for any blood type - or Genotype or your own SWAMI does cost money.  And for students,  fixing all of your own food from whole foods can be either more than challenging or almost impossible.  BUT IT CAN BE DONE, although it takes a high degree of dedication.  

The folks here are always more than happy to offer suggestions and the best answers to questions that they can come up with, so ask some specific questions and people will really try to help.


6 years on ER BTD, went from sick and dying to healthier And 30 pounds slimmer.  

Dec 2013: Started Swami Xpress - I'm 48% Explorer with hybridized Explorer/BTD list. A new adventure for this old lady!  -- LOST 5 more pounds on SWAMI! 
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EquiPro
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 2:13pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi, Tomtype O!  There are many, many frugal foods that we O types can eat.  The number 1 for me would be eggs!  Eggs are a great food for Os!  They fill us up and give a great dose of protein and necessary fat!  Black beans are good - I would just try not to eat them with rice if you are trying to lose weight as that combination always put pounds on me.  I eat peas a lot instead of grains and they help to stave off my grain cravings.

Ground beef is your friend as are all types of salad veggies.  Just eat more and more and more veggies, using meat and eggs as your sides.

Good luck!


FRESH START TODAY!!!
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C_Sharp
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 2:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kangaroo is unrated for O, thus assumed to be neutral.

As I recall this meat is supposed to be fairly economical in Australia.

http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2004/01/25/type-o-and-kangaroo-meat-1?blog=27


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.

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C_Sharp  -  Saturday, August 23, 2014, 3:03pm
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ruthiegirl
Sunday, August 24, 2014, 8:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Oats and apples are OK for O secretors. Rice is fine for all Os. Several kinds of beans, including great northern beans and black beans, are fine for all Os. Garbanzo beans are fine for secretors and lentils are OK for non-secretors.

Os need protein and lots of it. Bean-only meals tend to not work well for Os at all- leaving us sluggish and unsatisfied. But some meat or eggs cooked with beans can work. It's better to have beans plus a small amount of protein several meals in a row, rather than having a meat-heavy meal one day and then trying a vegan meal another day. I wouldn't even attempt to worry about how many eggs vs how much meat and how much poultry and how much  fish. Just aim for the total amount of animal protein needed. Eggs are very cheap, as is canned tuna. Look for the cheapest cuts of meat at the grocery store- that often means ground beef, chicken, or turkey. If you ever have meat on the bone, save the bones for making soup.

If money is REALLY tight, I'd focus on getting enough protein and veggies, and not worrying quite as much if some of those veggies aren't on the OK list. Staying away from wheat is the main thing Os need to focus on, with potato and corn coming in a close second. Os vary widely in our reaction to dairy- some can eat it with no obvious problems, while others REALLY need to stay away from it.

Make sure to get plenty of veggies, and try to eat them with as many meals as possible. Frozen spinach is easy to add to eggs or soups. Veggies and fruits in season tend to be inexpensive, and frozen veggies are affordable too. Canned veggies are good in a pinch (like finals week.)


Ruth, Single Mother to 20 yo  O- Leah , 18 yo O- Hannah, and  13 yo B+ Jack


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Beck_O+
Sunday, August 24, 2014, 10:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from TomtypeO
I’m looking for student recipes and meal ideas for an O Blood type.
With the staples; lentils, noodles, oats, potatoes, bread, apples & oranges on the avoid list and many of the beneficial or neutral foods; quinoa, almond flour/milk, red meat, nuts, seeds and dried fruit being financially unfeasible for students it is difficult for meal planning and the diet would seem unappealing.
If we look for alternative meal ideas for students it could help encourage a younger generation to better educated in their diet, leading to healthier lifestyles.


I'm from Melbourne too.  Although I am extremely new to this, I would suggest minced meat as your cheapest option. With Coles and Woolies always competing, the price has dropped to $5 a kilo.  I'm not sure if you are anywhere near a Tasman meats but they have legs of lamb or BBQ chops for $6.99 a kilo, which is really cheap. A leg of lamb will give you plenty of leftovers for the days to come.
A shepherds pie with a sweet potato topping instead of potatoes is a cheap meal.  Spag Bol is another meal if you buy a rice pasta. You will get many meals out of one 500g pack.  Maybe a meatloaf or rissoles (meatballs).
The price of veggies are really up at the moment so I have been buying frozen for ones that aren't coming out of my garden.
Even though eggs are becoming quite dear here, they are great for binding your mince for meatballs or meatloaf.  
I hope this helps  


My aim is to get my health back on track and lose about 35kg in the process.  I am falling to pieces!
Start: 19th August 2014
How do I feel: 5/10
Weight Loss to date: 2.8 16th September 2014
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deblynn3
Sunday, August 24, 2014, 11:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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What do you have to cook with? Are you living in a dorm? or do you have you own apartment, house?  I agree with Ruth, I usually put some meat into my beans. I can cut the meat portion by half this way. I have used can beans with chicken stripped off the bone and my vegetables heated on top of the stove using one sauce pan. Making it a easy cleanup & fast meal. Turmeric, Paprika, cilantro or parsley, onion, garlic, salt are all good spices for most Os. You can buy them in bulk great for a slow pot meal, if you have a slow pot, you could use dry beans. I like chicken with Great Northern beans, and beef (often ground beef) with the black beans. My husband will want rice, but it's not needed.  By changing up the vegetables, meat, and type of beans you can have several different meals.


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TomtypeO
Tuesday, August 26, 2014, 11:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you for all the well though out responses.

I live in a share house with normal kitchen appliances (oven, hotplates, grill, microwave) but will look into a slow cooker as this would be very helpful with dry beans.

Combining beans and cheap meat makes it a lot easier and financially viable. I have been alternating between proteins; mince, then tuna/salmon, chicken/egg and beans as one per day. As mention, not feeling particularly satisfied on the (vegetarian) bean only days.

Frozen veggies I will look into, as recently (being the end of winter) there have not been many options at the local market. Peas would good also and split peas for soups.

I did a bit of reading on the “Caveman” paleo diet (which is very similar to O blood type) and they have plenty of carb substitutes using vegetables.
For example
•     Lasagna sheets for zucchini
•     Spaghetti for peeled carrot
•     Potatoes for sweet potatoes (hash browns, mash potato or shepherds pie as Beck_O+ mentioned)
•     Wraps for leafy greens

There are also many rice options that I found are not too unreasonable
E.g. Rice milk, rice flour, rice pasta (as deblynn3 and Beck_O+ wrote)

I looked at kangaroo and it’s still a bit much (patties aren’t too bad) but saw that cow organs at the market are affordable (and apparently really good for you).
Would love any advice on cooking liver, heart etc.

Some other things that came up when I was trawling the internet for snack ideas were
•     Brown rice with fruit (like one would with oats)
•     Dips (dairy free) with veggies
•     Bean based puddings (cocoa is fine for O blood types)
•     Most O blood type vegetables/salads you can eat raw as a snack (the exceptions being sweet potatoes and some people would consider spinach/kale & broccoli/turnips also)


The patient was a blood type A. The doctor accidentally recorded down the wrong blood type, it was a "typo".
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deblynn3
Tuesday, August 26, 2014, 1:08pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Never done heart, but liver needs to be at least pink inside, people don't like liver because they over cook, making it leathery. I once used pineapple, water chestnuts, (sweet and sour style) for my sister who wouldn't eat liver and she loved that.


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Annaseed
Monday, October 20, 2014, 12:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I like this thread its helpful for myself as i'm on d budget.

Have just looked into Liver. We r only alloewd ;caLF,chicken and pig.
Have cooked chicken liver.
for a 200g liver i use about 100g onion. i i fry this 2 together till there's no pink left inside of d liver. u can spices,improvise .Calf liver did only once. Very expensive here in England. fallowed online suggestions almost didnt work ...

' And for students,  fixing all of your own food from whole foods can be either more than challenging or almost impossible.  BUT IT CAN BE DONE, although it takes a high degree of dedication.'  Absolutely true. it takes more than dedication for me. Am latelly sacrificing my sleep ...

...when u say eggs are relatively cheap i guess u meant non organic eggs? where as i think we r suppouse to eat as much as possible organic?

How about chilly con carne? cheap healthy?
How about omelet with vegys?
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ABJoe
Monday, October 20, 2014, 1:55pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Annaseed
Have just looked into Liver. We r only alloewd ;caLF,chicken and pig.

Per blood type ratings, no type is allowed pig.


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ruthiegirl
Monday, October 20, 2014, 3:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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When on a very tight budget, compromises usually need to be made. It may not  be possible to buy organic animal foods. Eating adequate quantities of non-organic meat, poultry, and eggs, plus fish and non-organic veggies and rice is healthier for an O than eating wheat, corn, potatoes, and too many carbs in general.

It would be great if factory farms didn't exist and all foods were organic, and everybody still had enough money to buy enough food. But we don't live in that ideal world. We're all trying to do our best with the resources we have available.


Ruth, Single Mother to 20 yo  O- Leah , 18 yo O- Hannah, and  13 yo B+ Jack


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Annaseed
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"Eating adequate quantities of non-organic meat, poultry, and eggs, plus fish and non-organic veggies and rice is healthier for an O than eating wheat, corn, potatoes, and too many carbs in general."

Thank you  ruthiegirl
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Peppermint Twist
Friday, November 14, 2014, 3:41pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Quoted from TomtypeO
I’m looking for student recipes and meal ideas for an O Blood type.
With the staples; lentils, noodles, oats, potatoes, bread, apples & oranges on the avoid list and many of the beneficial or neutral foods; quinoa, almond flour/milk, red meat, nuts, seeds and dried fruit being financially unfeasible for students it is difficult for meal planning and the diet would seem unappealing.
If we look for alternative meal ideas for students it could help encourage a younger generation to better educated in their diet, leading to healthier lifestyles.

Oh my gosh, this diet is SO doable on a budget!  Because it is based on whole, unprocessed foods, you can really do well if you know what you are doing.  The protein-laden/nutrient-dense items (namely MEAT, nuts and seeds) are going to be your most expensive items, but the thing people don't think about is that, while they are expensive, yes, you don't need to eat a lot of such items to get the nutrition you need from them:  a six-ounce (fist-sized) portion of meat in a meal is plenty.  The other thing people don't realize, and they are actually being "pennywise but pound foolish" when they don't, is that, when we eat a diet that deeply nourishes our bodies and balances our brain chemistry, we are SATISFIED, which in turn means that we are no longer ruled by cravings, which in turn (stay with me!   ) means that we don't go out and by a bunch of empty carbs like chips, cookies, etc.  You will find that the BTD is delicious and satisfying, and HELPS you stay on a budget!

Like I said, you will spend some money on meat:  I try to buy ground meat, as it is cheaper, but I also don't skimp when it comes to organic, especially with meat:  I try to go either organic or, like the supermarket chain I shop at has a "Greenwise" line and, while not everything in it is certified organic (which is the ideal), their Greenwise meats are raised without antibiotics and hormones, free range, etc.  I try to buy organic when possible, but I buy conventional items, too.  So, once you have your meat--oh, and chicken thighs are another excellent buy, and they freeze very well--you then can buy veggies, such as sweet potatoes, onions, etc., very inexpensively, compared to overly-packaged foods that most people are buying.  As the wisdom goes:  stick to the outside aisles of the grocery store and you'll do well.  Also, frozen bags of veggies are a good buy:  peas, broccoli, etc.  I buy a HUGE bag of freshed, chopped collard greens (very buget-friendly and packed with nutrients) and a friend only recently pointed out that they freeze very well in those bags.

The "big ticket" (money-wise) items in my budget are, as I said, meat, seeds and nuts, and then also my oils/fats:  olive oil (luckily, my locally-owned HFS now has their own brand and it is WAY cheaper than other brands, but it is still $7.99 per bottle...totally worth it--again, fat and protein keep us feeling SATED/satisfied, which is worth its weight in gold, as that helps us not crave and is what makes this diet so sustainable.

I must admit to buying bagged salads, which are expensive, yes, but for a single person, and one who is very busy, too, it is worth it, as I don't buy a head of this lettuce and a head of that lettuce and spend my life chopping and prepping.

You will learn, as you go along, how to do this on a budget.  I recently sold my house of 18 years and now have bought a new one with what, for me, is a HUGE mortgage and a much higher monthly mortgage payment (even though I put what, again for me, was a HUGE amount down, as I basically put almost my entire liquified previous house down), so now I've been really trying to stick to a food budget.  It is challenging yet also a bit FUN, in an odd way.  It's very cool when you realize you can do it!  


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
Friday, November 14, 2014, 3:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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P.S.  re:

Quoted from TomtypeO
There are also many rice options that I found are not too unreasonable
E.g. Rice milk, rice flour, rice pasta (as deblynn3 and Beck_O+ wrote)


I would read the ingredients carefully on the rice milk, as most of the commercial brands contain a LOT of sugar.  As for rice pasta, that is a compliant food and a good alternative to wheat pasta, but FYI, I love it but it tends to trigger my carb cravings because it is a refined grain product and thus higher on the glycemic index than whole rice.  I go for the brown, basmati rice (don't get the white basmati, it is WAAAAAAAY starchier/pastier--the brown is a lovely texture), but I must say it is expensive.  A bag of plain brown rice, though, is far more reasonable.

I usually cook up a pot of rice once per week, with onion and sometimes that "broccoli slaw" that you can find bagged in most grocery stores, and then I have a batch of rice ready to go that will last the entire week, for quick use in stir-fries or whatever!  

Other choices instead of grains (and us O's tend to fare best on starchy root veggies for comfort carbs, versus grains) are sweet potatoes and squash.  I've recently discovered "sweet dumpling squash" and they are fabulous and very nice in wintertime, when I find I want the more comforty-carby type of carbs, versus a cold salad (I live on salads all summer, with my meat/protein tossed in there, and then watermelon for a sweet dessert, if you will).

Good luck.  You really can make this work.



"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Peppermint Twist
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P.P.S.  re:

Quoted from EquiPro
Hi, Tomtype O!  There are many, many frugal foods that we O types can eat.  The number 1 for me would be eggs!  Eggs are a great food for Os!  They fill us up and give a great dose of protein and necessary fat!


omg, EXCELLENT point, Equi!!!  I can't believe I didn't launch into an ode to eggs myself:  they are, imho, the best buy in the entire grocery store:  cheap, high in extremely high-quality protein, good fat, and vitamin K (which I personally need, especially in winter--gotten thicken up that blood of mine and get 'er clottin', if necessary...but I digress massively), and last but not least, they are very satisfying and filling, and keep me going all day.

This morning, I had an "Against the Grain" bagel, pan-toasted/fried in a bit of olive oil, with an egg over easy-ish, over which I then drizzled some dark-toasted sesame oil, and sprinkled sea salt and nutritional yeast flakes.  Now, yes, the bagels are expensive compared to the poison also known as regular, shelf-stable wheat bread.  They are perishable (they come frozen, but you defrost 'em in the fridge and keep 'em in there) but they last me a week or so.  And the nutritional yeast is VERY expensive, so you may wish to skip that altogether, but anyway--delish and nutrish!  Gotta go--boss just dumped yet another huge pile of work on me.  Later, all!

Edited to add:  Had to pop back on at risk of my job to add that, the above-described breakfast keeps me going ALL DAY until dinner.  I don't typically eat lunch, but instead will take a walk during my half-hour lunch break.  On weekends, I'm usually too busy to stop for lunch and, at this point, I'm in awe of people stopping everything for lunch, particularly if they go out to eat, which seems to take hours.  I can't relate to having that much time *lol*.  Speaking of which:  BYE!


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Mother
Friday, November 14, 2014, 4:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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PT,

I live on salads in the summer too but like warmer cooked foods as the weather gets colder. Any ideas for starch free meals? Lately I have been stir frying bok choy  in a little ghee with a lamb meatball for BF. Lunch has been steamed broccoli emulsified with my blender, a little added water and rosemary, oregano or some other herbs and I throw some turkey, chicken or beef in it. Kind of an herbed broccoli thick stew/soup. Dinner has been spinach salads or steamed veg with protein, usually fish. I need some fast different ideas. I do love cooked fish and a side of veggies so I guess that can work for awhile. I love my lunch stew and BF stir fry but sometimes want a little more variety.


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ruthiegirl
Friday, November 14, 2014, 7:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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How about soups? Saute up onions, garlic, and sea salt in olive oil (add some carrots too if you do well on them) and  then add water or broth, greens, some cubed squash if you want, and then some kind of cooked meat. Let simmer for an hour or more so all the flavors meld and the greens (plus any other raw veggies)fully cook. Raw or frozen greens work equally well.

Meatballs work well in soups. For those on super-strict budgets, adding in some cooked beans to the soup helps to stretch the meat further. I can't have a meal with JUST beans as the protein, but mix together beans and meat (or eggs, etc) and I can fill up with less meat.

This is a great crockpot recipe too, if you're going to be out all day. Start with either cooking the onions in a frying pan, or mix onions, oil, and salt in the crock pot and let cook on high for an hour before adding other ingredients. The in-crockpot method is easier, but precooking in another pan takes less time. You can even saute a lot of veggies when you have time in the kitchen, then freeze the cooked veggies, and add a baggie of pre-sauteed greens to the crock pot with everything else, turn it on, and go. (Make sure it's plugged in first! Nothing worse than coming home to a home-cooked meal to find your crock pot full of uncooked, room temperature ingredients!)


Ruth, Single Mother to 20 yo  O- Leah , 18 yo O- Hannah, and  13 yo B+ Jack


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deblynn3
Friday, November 14, 2014, 7:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Just to add to Ruth's comment you can pre- cook your ground meat, and pre-soak you beans. (dried bagged beans are cheaper) A whole chicken can be cooked in a slow pot too. Then pull the leftover meat use in soup, or as a stir fry/ with rice for another meal and also mix with boiled eggs, for chicken salad just eat out of a bowl. don't know about your location but frozen veggies are cheaper than fresh for me and they only need to be heated up, all prep work is done. So this might be an area to check prices.


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Mother
Friday, November 14, 2014, 8:24pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks ladies. I always have tons of pre cooked protein and veggies in my freezer. I have all varieties of meatballs. I just add lots of herbs to the ground meat and only cook the red meats for 8-10 min before freezing. then they are rare and I can add them to any dish and warm them up without over cooking them. I don't like well done red meat so this works perfect. I do add them to stir fries or soup. I always have lots of frozen and fresh veggies available

I'm not sure what I was asking. I do stir fries, soups and just steamed veggies. Without starch, what else is there? I add lots of different flavors with herbs and oils. In the colder weather I think I just want to cook my comfort foods like I used to, with all the sauces and gravies and starches and I can't. This diabetes has me over a fence with food. . I want you to tell me how to make pumpkin pie and fruit topped baked brie diabetic friendly and dairy free!!! . I'm a nut case!

Thanks for all your help. I do forget about beans sometimes, thanks Ruthie.


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Patty H
Saturday, November 15, 2014, 12:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
When on a very tight budget, compromises usually need to be made. It may not  be possible to buy organic animal foods. Eating adequate quantities of non-organic meat, poultry, and eggs, plus fish and non-organic veggies and rice is healthier for an O than eating wheat, corn, potatoes, and too many carbs in general.

It would be great if factory farms didn't exist and all foods were organic, and everybody still had enough money to buy enough food. But we don't live in that ideal world. We're all trying to do our best with the resources we have available.


I would have to say that I have never read in any of Dr. D's books or publications or in my SwamiPro, that grain-fed beef is allowed.  It is extremely unhealthy as it is high in Omega-6 and low in Omega-3 which promotes inflammation.  For O's in particular, inflammation is one of the key health issues that can lead to autoimmune diseases, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome . . . the list goes on and on.

Below is a quote from ER4YT on page 52:

Quoted Text

Dietary recommendations today generally discourage the consumption of too much animal protein because saturated fats have been proven to be a risk factor for heart disease and cancer.  Of course, most of the meat consumed today is shot through with fat and tainted by the indiscriminate use of hormones and antibiotics.  "You are what you eat" can take on an ominous meaning when you're talking about the modern meat supply.

Fortunately, organic and free-range meats are becoming more widely available.  The success of the Type O Diet depends on your use of lean, chemical-free meats, poultry and fish.


From the GenoType Diet on page 125:

Quoted Text

Bad fats increase inflammation and can cause damage to the walls of the arteries.  Trans fats are bad for the arteries; an undesirable ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fats can increase the levels of inflammation.


I agree with many of the other posters that you can do this diet on a budget.  Here are some of the things I try to do to eat healthy and stay within the guidelines:

Join a meat co-op where they offer grass-fed, free range beef, free range chicken and eggs.  I know this might be difficult for a student because you would have to come up with a lump sum to buy into the co-op and then have freezer space to store your monthly CSA allotments, but I thought I would put it out there not knowing your exact situation.

Eat lamb - I would imagine that living in Australia lamb is readily available.  I have no idea of the cost in Australia, but lamb is always grass fed and is considered a highly beneficial meat for Type O.

Buy ground grass-fed beef and lamb.  The ground version of any meat is always going to be less expensive.  This option gives you multiple ways to cook and prepare your food in bulk and freeze it for meals on the go.  One of my and my family's favorite meals is lamb burgers on salad with sea salt and evoo!  Simple but yummy.  I am allowed some types of cheeses, such as manchego, so occasionally I will make a cheeseburger with compliant cheese and eat it on salad instead of a roll.  Make meatballs for a quick snack and freeze them.

Buy compliant stew meat and make soups, stews and chili.  This can be frozen as well and re-heated for a quick, healthy meal.

Buy the least expensive cuts of meat and slow cook them for a delicious meal with root veggies.  Pot roast can be a yummy meal!  Substitute parsnips for the potatoes.

Watch the grocery stores for sales and buy meat and poultry when it is on sale.  Lamb can be inexpensive at certain times of year such as around Easter when many people eat lamb.

Try to find a farmer's market or a farm stand where you can buy organic veggies and possibly grass-fed meats and eggs.  Buying veggies at a farmer's market in bulk and then cooking and freezing the veggies can help to cut down on the cost.  These can be cooked alone or added to stews, soups, chili and casseroles.

Switch out your pasta and potatoes for organic, non-GMO brown rice.  Buy compliant beans and lentils and eat vegetarian a few meals a weeks.  Buy rice pasta instead of wheat pasta.  I like to sauté shrimp with lemon, garlic and evoo and put it over rice pasta once in a while for a delicious meal that feels like I am cheating!

Eat organic, non-gmo oatmeal for breakfast and add some nuts.  Since you probably don't know whether you are a secretor or not, I would assume that you are a secretor since the odds favor that.

Just remember that you are what you eat and that you can do this on a budget if you are willing to do some comparative shopping and food prep in advance.



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Patty H
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HUNTER L(a+b-) NMg Prop Super Taster ENFP
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,450
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Location: Massachusetts
Age: 57
Quoted from Mother
Thanks ladies. I always have tons of pre cooked protein and veggies in my freezer. I have all varieties of meatballs. I just add lots of herbs to the ground meat and only cook the red meats for 8-10 min before freezing. then they are rare and I can add them to any dish and warm them up without over cooking them. I don't like well done red meat so this works perfect. I do add them to stir fries or soup. I always have lots of frozen and fresh veggies available

I'm not sure what I was asking. I do stir fries, soups and just steamed veggies. Without starch, what else is there? I add lots of different flavors with herbs and oils. In the colder weather I think I just want to cook my comfort foods like I used to, with all the sauces and gravies and starches and I can't. This diabetes has me over a fence with food. . I want you to tell me how to make pumpkin pie and fruit topped baked brie diabetic friendly and dairy free!!! . I'm a nut case!

Thanks for all your help. I do forget about beans sometimes, thanks Ruthie.


How about lamb shanks?  They are inexpensive and yummy when properly prepared.  I have a bunch of them in the freezer that I have been saving for the onset of cold weather.  We are going to make them today! The original recipe I have adapted is from one of the Silver Palate Cookbooks.  It is an elegant, yet fairy inexpensive meal!  The original recipe calls for leeks, which are a more gourmet type of onion if you can have them.  For a more complex flavor, you can use shallots instead of onions.  If you choose to use leeks, you sauté them with the carrots and parsnips instead of onions and you do not need to sauté the garlic, just put raw garlic in the stock pot.  It also calls for red new potatoes.  If you can have the potatoes, just cut them up raw and put them in the stock pot.

Here is my O compliant version:
Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees.
Sauté onions (or shallots) and garlic in evoo in a large, oven proof, stock pot or dutch oven.  In a large frying pan, cook some compliant bacon if you can find it.  WF does carry bacon that is made from turkey and does not have all the chemicals.  Take out the bacon and let it cool.  Once it is cooled, break it into pieces and add it to the stock pot.  

Brown the meat that has been dredged in compliant flour in the bacon fat and put it in the stock pot.  Then in the same frying pan, lightly sauté carrots and parsnips and add a bit of compliant sweetener to caramelize the veggies. Remove the veggies and set aside.

Add to the frying pan, a bottle of inexpensive red wine (if you can afford it) and some beef stock, a tablespoon of dried thyme or a little less fresh thyme, a couple of tablespoons of ghee and 2 tablespoons of red currant jelly or another type of red jelly that is not too sweet.  (You can leave this out if you are concerned about the sugar, but it does add a nice, complex flavor) Bring to a boil and cook until the jelly melts, all the while scraping the bottom of the pan to deglaze the pan.  Add the liquid to the stock pot with the garlic, onions, bacon and meat and cook, covered for one hour.

While that is cooking, dice and de-seed some plum tomatoes and add them to the sautéed carrots and parsnips.  

After the meat has cooked for one hour, uncover the stock pot and add the carrots, parsnips and tomatoes.  Cook uncovered for at least another hour until the meat falls off the bone.

This recipe can be adapted by using grass fed beef stew meat, pot roast or short ribs as well.  I usually make a very large batch and freeze what we do not consume.  BTW, this is a great meal to serve company because everything is done in advance and you can clean up all but the stock pot.  I serve it with a nice compliant crusty bread if you can find some and a green salad.  Your house will smell AMAZING while this is cooking!

Bon Appétit      


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