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Comparison of diets (broad population)  This thread currently has 490 views. Print Print Thread
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Lloyd
Sunday, April 6, 2014, 2:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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http://www.plosone.org/article.....p;representation=PDF

Abstract below - emphasis mine. More at link includes some plusses and minuses detailed for all diets on a one-size basis. How much of the various effects (all diets) is correlated to blood type is not examined. Moreover, while vegetarian receives focus in the abstract other diets show their own issues in this study.

Quoted Text

Population-based studies have consistently shown that our diet has an influence on health. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyze differences between different dietary habit groups in terms of health-related variables. The sample used for this cross-sectional study was taken from the Austrian Health Interview Survey AT-HIS 2006/07. In a first step, subjects were
matched according to their age, sex, and socioeconomic status (SES). After matching, the total number of subjects included in the analysis was 1320 (N=330 for each form of diet – vegetarian, carnivorous diet rich in fruits and vegetables, carnivorous diet less rich in meat, and carnivorous diet rich in meat). Analyses of variance were conducted controlling for lifestyle factors in the following domains: health (self-assessed health, impairment, number of chronic conditions, vascular risk), health care (medical treatment, vaccinations, preventive check-ups), and quality of life. In addition, differences concerning the presence of 18 chronic conditions were analyzed by means of Chi-square tests. Overall, 76.4% of all subjects were female. 40.0% of the individuals were younger than 30 years, 35.4% between 30 and 49 years, and 24.0% older than 50 years. 30.3% of the subjects had a low SES, 48.8% a middle one, and 20.9% had a high SES. Our results revealed that a vegetarian diet is related to a lower BMI and less frequent alcohol consumption. Moreover, our results showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with poorer health (higher incidences of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders), a higher need for health care, and poorer quality of life. Therefore, public health programs are needed in order to reduce the
health risk due to nutritional factors.
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Amazone I.
Sunday, April 6, 2014, 3:21pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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amazing amazing ..here they try to make you belief that higher meat consumption is related to cancer issues ...and best would be or mediterranien diet or vegetarien diet... ......

thanxs Lloyd for sharing...great...


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Chloe
Sunday, April 6, 2014, 4:46pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Amazone I.
amazing amazing ..here they try to make you belief that higher meat consumption is related to cancer issues ...and best would be or mediterranien diet or vegetarien diet... ......

thanxs Lloyd for sharing...great...


Seems rather contradictory to me.....or am I reading this incorrectly?

Our results revealed that a vegetarian diet is related to a lower BMI and less frequent alcohol consumption. Moreover, our results showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with poorer health (higher incidences of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders), a higher need for health care, and poorer quality of life.




"The happiest people don't have the best of everything.....they know how to make the best of everything!"
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Lloyd
Sunday, April 6, 2014, 6:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Chloe


Seems rather contradictory to me.....or am I reading this incorrectly?

Our results revealed that a vegetarian diet is related to a lower BMI and less frequent alcohol consumption. Moreover, our results showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with poorer health (higher incidences of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders), a higher need for health care, and poorer quality of life.




Why does it follow that the things in blue are going to make the things in red untrue?

One can have a longer life expectancy (on average) and at the same time have poorer health, more likelihood of cancer, et al.

For example, if the likelihood of cancer increases from 1% to 2% it doubles the cancer rate but affects mortality on 1% or fewer of the population. The remaining 98% may live an extra few years in the meantime more than canceling out lost years from the cancer group.

I'd be much more troubled by the quality of life aspects and poorer overall health. There is not enough detail of any kind to infer the significance of overall changes as there is not enough detail on the relative or absolute measures using only that single quote.

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san j
Monday, April 7, 2014, 1:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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It seems to me the only thing really furnished by these results is some more ballast for an argument against the Vegetarianism-For-All crowd.


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DoS
Monday, April 7, 2014, 4:07pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Low BMI and muscle mass? Low alcohol because of OCD and extreme hangovers?

I don't see the conflict.

Type O's love being vegetarian. And some times it's better than their precious porktarian diet.

Type A's love being paleo.

Why? Hell if I know.
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Averno
Monday, April 7, 2014, 5:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from san j
It seems to me the only thing really furnished by these results is some more ballast for an argument against the Vegetarianism-For-All crowd.


That, and the utter futility of attempting to determine specificity within broadly (un)defined parameters. The study looks like it was designed by people knowing absolutely nothing about nutrition. Does vegetarian mean eating wheat, corn and sugar 3X per day? Dividing dietary habits according to meat consumption leaves a lot of territory unexplored.


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Lloyd
Monday, April 7, 2014, 6:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Averno

The study looks like it was designed by people knowing absolutely nothing about nutrition. Does vegetarian mean eating wheat, corn and sugar 3X per day?


While I agree that the study was not as rigorously designed as one might like for our purposes, the fact that there is an initial study that might prompt some more specific studies is far more important than finding faults with the current study - of which there are many.

Perspective, please.

Quoted Text
While 0.2% of the interviewees were pure vegetarians (57.7%
female), 0.8% reported to be vegetarians consuming milk and eggs
(77.3% female), and 1.2% to be vegetarians consuming fish and/
or eggs and milk (76.7% female). 23.6% reported to combine a
carnivorous diet with lots of fruits and vegetables (67.2% female),
48.5% to eat a carnivorous diet less rich in meat (60.8% female),
and 25.7% a carnivorous diet rich in meat (30.1% female). Since
the three vegetarian diet groups included a rather small number of
persons (N = 343), they were analyzed as one dietary habit group.
Moreover, since the vegetarian group was the smallest, we decided
to match each of the vegetarians (1) with an individual of each
other dietary habit group (carnivorous diet rich in fruits and
vegetables (2), carnivorous diet less rich in meat (3) and a
carnivorous rich in meat (4)).
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Averno
Monday, April 7, 2014, 9:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Lloyd


While I agree that the study was not as rigorously designed as one might like for our purposes, the fact that there is an initial study that might prompt some more specific studies is far more important than finding faults with the current study - of which there are many.

Perspective, please.



The study appears to turn the table on the vegetarianism movement. Yes, this should be enough to spur on a deeper investigation.  I suppose there's value in it then- progress is better than no progress- but we're in a rut if we accept poor progress. A lot of people worked on this project and spent a lot of time and money to conclude little more than the necessity of further study. Maybe this is how these thing work. Maybe this is what's wrong with how these things work. I hope that anyone spring-boarding off of this study is searching for more.

Quoted Text
Potential limitations
… no statements can be made whether the poorer health in vegetarians in our study is caused by their dietary habit or if they consume this form of diet due to their poorer health status. We cannot state whether a causal relationship exists, but describe ascertained associations.

…Further limitations include the measurement of dietary habits as a self-reported variable and the fact that subjects were asked how they would describe their eating behavior, without giving them a clear definition of the various dietary habit groups.

…Another limitation concerns the lack of detailed information regarding nutritional components (e.g. the amount of carbohydrates, cholesterol, or fatty acids consumed).

Conclusions
Our study has shown that Austrian adults who consume a vegetarian diet are less healthy (in terms of cancer, allergies, and mental health disorders), have a lower quality of life, and also require more medical treatment.



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Averno  -  Monday, April 7, 2014, 10:38pm
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DoS
Monday, April 7, 2014, 11:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Like I said, you'll probably find a lot more BT O vegetarians.

It isn't vegetarianism that's bad, it's who and how that aren't working out.

Luckily as many non-BT A people like paleo diet, do we, and it shows. BT O vegetarians have nice skin sometimes, they're skinny, but insecure and sometimes have constant infections.
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