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Blood Type B and potatoes  This thread currently has 1,588 views. Print Print Thread
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Mistyveg
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 7:05am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm new to the BTD, and having now just found out my secretor status and genotype, I'm doing some research.

In the food chart I received along with my secretor results, I was a bit disheartened to learn that potatoes were listed as AVOID for Type B non-secretors. I've loved potatoes my whole life, and given that I'm a tall, long, lanky ectomorph with a high metabolism, I find that I *need* starchy foods; potatoes are a great source for this. Rice is another, although this is looked at as fine for Bs in general.

Anyone here, particularly Bs (secretors or non-secretors), have issues with potato consumption? Or do you have more information concerning potatoes and specific Genotypes?
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ABJoe
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 4:02pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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There is a lectin in potato which may be the issue...  The lectin is said to disturb the gut mucosa and we want to keep the gut as happy as possible so we absorb nutrients from our foods properly...

How do sweet potatoes, onions, squash and pumpkin rate?  All of these are possible vegetable substitutes for potato in your diet.  Of course, there are also carbohydrate replacements, but they will probably have much smaller portions and frequency recommendations...


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san j
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 8:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm a B secretor. Potatoes are neutral for me.
I only recently have started buying them, however -- even so, I don't eat them often, as do most Americans. The nutritional payoff doesn't strike me as particularly high.
Nonetheless, I think the reason I like them so very well is that they simply are not frequently on my plate.


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Adopted4
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 9:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Welcome Mistyveg,

I have twin type B sons, one of whom is a confirmed non-secretor. He is also built like you; tall,lanky, with a very high metabolism. Very recently, while I was talking about his health problems in another thread, someone recommended I purchase Dr. D's book called "Allergies; fight them with the blood type diet". I was somewhat surprised to read that type B non-secretors should not consume large amounts of grain as they are the leading factor in triggering inflammatory responses in the body. It was always my understanding that a very thin type B should eat a modest amount of compliant grains as it would increase body fat. This is not the case.

To answer your question about potatoes, sweet potatoes would be an excellent choice for your type. Peas are another good carb choice, but you should really consider upping your intake of compliant meats as well as vegetables to compliment meals.

In our house I don't prepare regular potatoes as I live with 3 type O's, 2 type B's, and I'm the only type A. Only my B secretor son could eat potatoes but they wouldn't really be "good" for him like a beneficial food is, so he doesn't miss them and enjoys sweet potatoes.

For the record, before the blood type diet my type B sons ate a lot of chicken, wheat, and potatoes. Just simply getting rid of those highly problematic foods have noticeably, particularly in my B non-secretor son, helped increase his energy level and flexibility in Tae Kwon Do (they are black belts). He also has a lot less pain and stiffness in his joints and he is only 17 years old.


Coleen ISF-J, Non-Taster
"Religion that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world." James 1:26-27
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Kristin
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 9:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hello Mistyveg  

I am a B secretor and although potatoes are neutral for me via the BTD, they are a black dot (only to be eaten occasionally, if at all) on my SWAMI. I would say from my experience that they do not hold much potent nutritional value but act more like a filler, of sorts. But sometimes that filler is necessary so I like knowing that I can eat potatoes on occasion.

The suggestions that the other posters here have listed for starchy foods for B's are good ones. I particularly like sweet potatoes and use them in place of the potato in many arenas - mashed sweet potatoes, sweet potato hash browns, fries, baked, etc.


The true meaning of life is to plant trees under whose shade you do not expect to sit.

- Nelson Henderson
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ruthiegirl
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 9:37pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I'm in a family with 3 Os and a B. I don't prepare potatoes often, as only one family member is supposed to eat them. I make them as a special treat for Shabbos (the Jewish Sabbath; we make festive meals every Friday night) and there are sometimes leftovers that I'll reheat for him later in the week. During Passover, one of my type O daughters chose to have some potatoes too- as an extra special holiday treat, knowing they're an "avoid" for her. I also serve whatever I've prepared to guests, regardless of their blood types.

I don't miss potatoes at all- I use sweet potatoes in just about every recipe where I used to use white potatoes. If my son would eat the sweet potatoes, I'm not sure I'd bother buying white potatoes at all. But he's a picky eater- a fact that's not helped by the fact that he's the only B in the house so I've gotten into the habit of catering to his "wants" as well as his dietary needs.

I'm pretty sure he's a secretor, based on how horribly he reacts to tomatoes, but since I haven't tested him yet I don't know for certain. He definitely does NOT need the extra calories; he's carrying around extra fat and I need to get him to eat more fruits and veggies, more protein, and exercise more. I won't limit the starch consumption for a growing child, but I will insist he eat some protein and veggies before filling up on rice or oatmeal.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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san j
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 10:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ruthiegirl
I'm pretty sure he's a secretor, based on how horribly he reacts to tomatoes, but since I haven't tested him yet I don't know for certain.


I'm a B secretor.
I don't "react horribly to tomatoes".
I wouldn't assume that anyone who does is a secretor.

Some B's who "should" do well with milk actually "react horribly" to it; that doesn't mean they're not B.


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Victoria
Tuesday, April 9, 2013, 11:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Although I ate potatoes almost daily for the majority of my life, I have not eaten them in 14 years. I don't skimp on carbohydrates, though.  The only grain I'm currently eating is a couple of toasted organic rice cakes used as a base for whatever I want to put on them.

I eat a sweet potato every day.  Not the orange ones they call yams, but an old-fashioned sweet potato with tan skin and yellow inside.  Great with ghee!  I also eat some frozen baby peas daily.  A couple of times a week, I'll eat some beans, such as Great Northern.

Lots and lots of other fresh vegetables, from green leafy, carrots, onions, butternut squash, mushrooms, zucchini, broccoli, etc.  



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Let me not pass you by in quest
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Mistyveg
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 2:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thank you all for your wonderful insight, and suggestions.

Yes, I eat sweet potatoes quite often, whether it's the yams, in the form of sweet potato fries, or the bagged potato itself (cooked, cut in half, with a bit of country crock spread on top). I also eat Rice, particularly with fresh green veggies, and white garlic butter sauce. These are all either on the "benny" or "neut" lists, so that makes me feel good. I haven't heard of the sweet potato hash browns, but that sounds very interesting.

I was glad to see Tomatoes on the 'neutral' list for me, because I consume quite a bit of tomatoes - either in salads, sandwiches, or in the form of tomato sauce/paste, when I eat pasta.
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TJ
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 3:10am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Adopted4
I have twin type B sons, one of whom is a confirmed non-secretor. He is also built like you; tall,lanky, with a very high metabolism. Very recently, while I was talking about his health problems in another thread, someone recommended I purchase Dr. D's book called "Allergies; fight them with the blood type diet". I was somewhat surprised to read that type B non-secretors should not consume large amounts of grain as they are the leading factor in triggering inflammatory responses in the body. It was always my understanding that a very thin type B should eat a modest amount of compliant grains as it would increase body fat. This is not the case.
This tall, lanky B-nonsecretor has found it helpful to avoid all grains and potatoes. I don't even care much for sweet potatoes lately. I get most of my carbs from fruits, especially bananas. Compliant beans/peas are also good.

Quoted from Mistyveg
...with a bit of country crock spread on top).
I'd work on transitioning over to butter instead. It's so good and good for you.
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Victoria
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 3:59am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Misty, is this the Country Crock you eat?

Country Crock Spread:
INGREDIENTS:  
Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil, Water, Whey, Milk, Salt, Vegetable Mono and Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Sorbate, Calcium Disodium EDTA, Citric Acid, Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A (Palimate), Beta Carotene, (coloring)

If so, I sure hope you'll consider transitioning to a healthier choice, such as butter;  or better still . . ghee!  



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Mistyveg
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 4:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Victoria
Misty, is this the Country Crock you eat?

Country Crock Spread:
INGREDIENTS:  
Vegetable Oil Blend (Liquid Soybean Oil, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil, Water, Whey, Milk, Salt, Vegetable Mono and Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Sorbate, Calcium Disodium EDTA, Citric Acid, Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A (Palimate), Beta Carotene, (coloring)

If so, I sure hope you'll consider transitioning to a healthier choice, such as butter;  or better still . . ghee!  


Yeah, that's the one. I *do* eat butter also. Didn't know that Vegetable Oil spreads weren't so healthy for you. Or is it just Country Crock spread? Haven't actually heard of ghee, until now...
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Henriette Bsec
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 7:32am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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All spreads are bad news !!!

Get some real butter  

I eat potatoes, not a lot but a few times a week, sweet potatoes are luxury and ridicolous expensive,and regular potatoes are neutral on all my Food plans.
Prefer potatoes over pasta and rice, but since I am overweight. Still keep them  to small amounts.
Ptatoes contains fever carbs and more vitamins than other strachy food.

A new potato just dug up form garden with plenty  of butter and fresh herbs are very tasty.


ENFP -naturalist, visual/spatial and musical/verbal/chatty Dane- Mother to DD Emma age 19,
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TJ
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 1:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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If you're worried about the "spreadability" factor, just leave a stick of butter out (unrefridgerated) in a dish. Room temperature butter takes a long time to go bad (especially salted) unless it's warm enough to melt and separate.
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ruthiegirl
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 2:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Partially hydrogenated oils are REALLY bad for everybody- the technique was actually designed initially for soap making, not for consumption! Soybean and cottonseed oils are "avoids" for type Bs, citric acid is likely corn-based, and "artificial flavors" and other chemicals (potassium sorbate,etc) are just not things humans should be eating. The water, whey, salt, beta carotene, and vitamin A are just fine though.

I'd suggest using up this package and then buying real butter in the future. Whipped butter spreads pretty well even from the fridge. A stick of butter at room temp spreads even easier. I keep a stick at room temp all the time; taking out another when the one that's out is nearly empty. I keep the extra sticks in the fridge.

I also keep ghee in the house; that I make about once a month from a pound of butter and keep it at room temperature.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


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Rev144
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 12:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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How to make Ghee
Buy organic butter if you can.  
http://www.veggiebelly.com/2012/01/how-to-make-ghee.html
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Mistyveg
Thursday, April 11, 2013, 1:41am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks everyone for the great suggestions.
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AnnaSKB
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I, too, was pretty new to the BTD in 2011 but had to learn it fast as health issues had just been diagnosed.  First thing I did was cut out wheat, corn, potatoes, tomatoes, sugar and chicken.
Instead I have rice bread, the slices are smaller but VERY filling, and green peas or Great Northern beans, beets, carrots, onions, lots of veggies, molasses or agave instead of sugar and turkey instead of chicken.  e.g.  eggs with onions and turkey bacon on rice bread with ghee or butter & cheese is very good and filling.  I also learned to make the no-tomato pasta sauce with 1 can beets/2 cans carrots/lemon/sea salt/turmeric/basil/oregano/parsley, blended, with ground turkey & rice pasta & cheese on top.   Those seasonings, as well as olive oil, sit by my stove and go in everything!    Also learned an excellent and very easy banana bread -but bananas are black dot so only sometimes so it's great while the 2 bananas needed are ripening...Advice...get the highly beneficial goods and spices to keep in the kitchen to make up recipes-when in doubt, cheese on top helps.  Make a list or take the book when going food shopping and check labels as sugar seems to be added to every thing.  You will find yourself eating more than ever before in your life and all beneficial things.  GOOD LUCK.  Regards  
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Taxman
Monday, April 15, 2013, 3:30am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Do any of you Bs eat goat?  It's not easy to find, the healthy grass fed variety, that is.

I know it's used a lot in East/West Indian and Jamaican cooking but just curious if anyone here eats it and if you have recipes to share.

As for potatoes, sweet potatoes are a replacement I can happily live with.  Prepared well, they can taste quite decadent!  Yum!!!
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Victoria
Monday, April 15, 2013, 5:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Taxman
Do any of you Bs eat goat?  It's not easy to find, the healthy grass fed variety, that is.

I know it's used a lot in East/West Indian and Jamaican cooking but just curious if anyone here eats it and if you have recipes to share.

As for potatoes, sweet potatoes are a replacement I can happily live with.  Prepared well, they can taste quite decadent!  Yum!!!


My type B daughter is able to find goat meat easily in the city where she lives.  She just throws it in a big pot with a little olive oil, stirs it around until it is seared on the outside, adds a little water, puts on the lid and slow-cooks it at very low heat for a few hours.  She's a simple cook, but her meals turn out delicious.

Yes, sweet potatoes are one of the most wonderful foods I've ever eaten.  And I never seem to grow tired of them.  Topped with ghee and a little almond butter !  Yum!



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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