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Research on food choices for all  This thread currently has 36,003 views. Print Print Thread
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C_Sharp
Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 7:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Typebase says that pimento is

CAPSICUM ANNUUM LONGUM

Capsicum Annum includes most pepper varieties

To me Longum is a long pepper that is hot and not a pimento is a squat sweet pepper.

I have been ignoring the scientific name in typebase and going with what I consider a pimento to me.  Which is the type of pepper stuffed into green olives.

I cannot buy fresh pimentos in grocery stores near where I live. I can buy it in jars with vinegar or citric acid (I avoid both). So I grow my own pimento peppers.  

I eat the pimento peppers while green (immature) and red (takes longer to get to this stage). I am not sure if the rating in the GenoType book and SWAMI only applies to mature pimentos or to both mature and immature pimentos (There has been prior discussion on the forums over this issue).


MIfHI                            I follow a SWAMI diet.
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Jenny
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Jenny's anecdotal evidence......a couple of years ago when I mistakenly thought I was an A2 I got obsessed with pimentos, and started to notice them here and there in f & v shops......they are thicker fleshed than capsicums/bell peppers, and squatter in shape, actually quite heart shaped. I tried to grow them from seed,  but the possums got to them first. Anyway, when it became clear that I was actually A1, the obsession faded.
Now on my swami diet, they are neutral, so I use capsicums/pimentos occasionally for colour and to prevent the feeling of restriction which occasionally bears down. Even when they are (in my estimation) pimentos, they will be labelled as capsicum in the shops.



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Cristina
Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 8:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks Kent, las night when I was researching via scientific name, everything came up as the  hot type pepper for it, but the descriptor of pimento clearly states that it is the sweet pepper, heart shaped one, which BTW I have seen in the shops somewhere here: it was an 'aha'moment, 'that is the Pimento from the lists'.  I say it must have been the result of somebody growing it locally and making it available to the shops.  I will report when and if i see it again.  Thanks





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Hi Jenny, thanks for your feedback, yes that is my experience too, stokier and heart shaped.  I also have them as neutral. Nice to have you here as usual coming in the nick of time to get us out of trouble.  It will be easier now to finalize this one.  

I will add them to my list of things to grow at home, at this rate, there will not be much of a lawn left here ...




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Jenny
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Since my gorgeous moggie died recently I have a redundant carry cage which is now going to serve as a plant raising venue for small pots, and maybe my remaining pimento seeds will have a chance to germinate and thrive there.
I've been busy lately with the birth of my second grandson (on my birthday!) but grandson no 1 and I still have lots of time in my garden which he (aged 2) works in like a true gardener."Granma....hole...spade...dig....water... hose...." etc etc.



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You got it all figured out about peppers / Capsicums, Cristina.  Good one!  I remember looking that up a few years ago when I started BTD - but forgot to add here  .

Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums.

Capsicum is one of the foods that I really love and hope I am non-secretor so I can keep eating them!!  Did stop for many years but have started them again recently thinking I'm a nonnie.

Thanks also for the essene bread info, Cristina!  Sorry haven't been online as much lately.
Squash would squish I think Possum?


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Ok Symbi  




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Quoted from Jenny
....I got obsessed with pimentos, and started to notice them here and there in f & v shops......they are thicker fleshed than capsicums/bell peppers, and squatter in shape, actually quite heart shaped. I tried to grow them from seed, but the possums got to them first.

oops wasn't me ... was my cousins

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Research on Pumpkin and Squash

Quoted from Symbi

Notice on here there was a thread about Butternut Squash.  I think that's american for what we call in Australia, Butternut Pumpkin.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butternut_squash
http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_%28plant%29

I notice squash is a different food item for Pumpkin in SWAMI.  And there's many kinds of squashes. Even Zucchini is related to squash.



My conclusion after studying the links below:

Working on the premises that Typebase Squash and Pumpkin share the same Scientific name and guided by references in the links below I believe Squash are mostly young pumpkins, or soft skinned pumpkins, while the pumpkins referred to the thicker skinned squash varieties that have been allowed to mature longer in their vines.

Except for the small button squash, generally speaking, in Australia/NZ, we tend to call them all pumpkins, while in America they use Squash instead for the same species as per Symbi's quote.

To translate these findings as food ratings in my Swami and for the time being until otherwise proven, I will place under Pumpkin all the winter variety Squash ones as well as the orange skin 'Halloween' type larger pumpkins.  The summer type squash goes under Squash in my ratings (unless of course they have a rating of their own, like the zucchini).

Check this site from a supermarket:
http://www.homeshop.com.au/web.....;bmUID=1258659964200

Typebase Squash and Pumpkin = CUCURBITA PEPO

Squash
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?399

Button Squash that can mature into pumpkin ...
http://www.beautanicals.com.au/buttonsquash.html

Sites with photos showing various types:
http://www.nt.gov.au/d/Content/File/p/Vegetable/VF8.pdf
http://www.flavours.com.au/Articles/Squash.pdf


Pumpkin
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?328

seeds with photos all varieties
http://www.twenga.com.au/dir-Garden-DIY,Seeds-and-bulbs,Pumpkin-seeds

How to tell them apart
http://www.thebegavalley.org.au/bvsspumpkins.html

butternut cup is not pumpkin:
http://www.annettemcfarlane.com/Stories/Pumpkin.pdf
http://www.marketfresh.com.au/produce_guide/product.asp?ID=103

Butternut squash recipes thread
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1257278159/  





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Cristina  -  Friday, November 20, 2009, 3:45am
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Good research Cristina!  Never knew the squash was a baby pumpkin, how cute.  Makes sense the summer ones are baby thin skinned and the winter are the fully grown hard skinned pumpkins.  I couldn't believe the picture on market fresh's website, that's an old pumpkin that I wouldn't buy a the market!  Learning more new things every day.

So does butternut squash go under Squash in your SWAMI or Pumpkin)?  Are there different values for those two items on anyone's SWAMI?  

Thanks for the Pimento info from Jenny before too.  I saw some info in Women's Health magazine that the top popular vegetables people are growing in their gardens are tomatoes, followed by capsicums.  Probably popular with possums too     I'm worried, we haven't seen our local ones for a while and we heard a cat bell one night.  


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Hi Symbi, thanks.  According to Typebase Butternut is listed under Squash, as a winter squash variety.  Many of the links I listed, not just the australian ones, but the american ones too, indicate that these varieties are referred to as 'pumpkins'.  So cutting a long story short (and I should have been more clear in my Conclusion wording, sorry), I place any of the thicker skins winter squashes and the large orange skined (halloween type pumpkins) under the category Pumpkin (diamond in my Swami).  The little, soft skin pumpkins that you can easily eat the skin when steamed, I consider them as 'Squash' and therefore a neutral in my Swami...


In other words, the Squash varieties are those small soft cushioning ones that they used to lay in front of Cindirella for her to walk on when she got out of the strong, thick skinned pumpkin carriage she was travelling on!!   . (They forgot to tell us that in the Cinderella story ...   )

I will edit my previous post to make this clearer.

Hope this helps.  Enjoy your pumpkin journey princess.  





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Research on Baking Soda:

Quoted from Symbi
... In another thread too, about your DH being stung by a bee, you found out that Baking Soda (US) = Bicarbonate of Soda (Aus).  Are you going to put that on the summary tables?  It isn't in SWAMI though as far as I know? ...


Thanks Symbi for that reminder PM, I appreciate it.  

Baking Soda is in my Swami, in the neutrals under 'Condiments'.  In Australia is usually marketed as Bicarbonate Soda, a term that Typebase uses to describe it.  It did not occurred to me then to check typebase when some of you guys were telling me to use it on DH bee sting!!  It is there plain an clear.  I keep the stuff at home all the time.  When used in conjunction with vinegar and a silk pantyhose, it becomes an excellent aid for cleaning.  I have not used it for baking, but since it is a neutral I may try it on the odd cake, maybe in thanksgiving fare.

Here is the TypeBase link:

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?602  

Just to make it clear, in conclusion:

Baking soda = Bicarbonate of soda

PS: some good brands even describe that on their packaging.  I usually buy the cheapest I can get my hands on, because I only use for cleaning, not for baking.  This cheap brand does not mentions anything about bicarbonate of soda.  It is woollies Home Brand (less than $1 per packet), beats laundry, dishwasher and oven cleaners $$$$$.  




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Cristina
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Agathe, MS, I know we had a pumpkin late evening for you, early morning for me, discussion a few weeks ago.  Where is your french thread? I did a search could not find it.  




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Agathe
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The french thread is in the "TypeBase4" section, Cristina.

(I'll come back to this thread later. Now I must leave for work.)

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Cristina
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Ok Agathe and thanks Lola for the link.
From the French translation thread:
Quoted from Cristina

For what I can gather a general rule of thumb, will be that pumpkins are the thick skinned ones (any will do in that category, unless specifically identify in the list as Jack, or Butternut, or whatever) and squash are the thin skinned ones that you can eat the skin and varieties here include your courgette (which has its own rating).

  I am making it up as I go here, rushed research trying to help while I sip a cup of coffee.  


Phewww!  it is obvious I reached the same conclusion then, as in this research.  I just needed to make sure there was no contradiction.  The more I read websites around the place, the more convinced I get that this is the right interpretation of these two food items...  




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Hi again, Cristina !

I went through the discussion about pumpkin / squash in this thread as well as in "French translation" once more.

The least one can say is that it's really difficult to disentangle all these varieties of cucurbitaceae !

Your idea of distinguishing squash from pumpkin out of whether it is a summer squash (young) or a winter squash (older) seems relevant to me. (I read the wikipedia english page for squash.)

But I stop here my investigations about squash. As it is neutral for me anyway and as I'm not used to eat them, excepted courgette, I'll rather focus on pumpkin that is beneficial.

As I understand, squash is a generic name for all cucurbitaceae. The equivalent in french is courge. I'm sure that if I asked ten persons "for you, what is a courge ?" I would get ten different answers. In fact, nobody really knows what a courge is !!!

I just think about something : french seems to confirm your hypthesis : a courgette is a small courge  

Bye bye

Agathe
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Research on Rice:

Just a collection of relevant information, nothing different to identify from our lists.  Northen and Southern hemispheres are at sync on this one.  

TypeBase Rice, white, brown, basmatic
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?346

TypeBase Rice, wild
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?347

Scientific name oryza Sativa
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oryza_sativa

General information
Brown rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_rice
White rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_rice
Wild rice
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_rice

Some information from Australian supplier:
http://www.sunrice.com.au/education/growing-rice-in-australia
http://www.organicroad.com.au/organic/flour-grains-rice/p/103

Patent on rice  
If you are interested in knowing how the genomes, chromosomes, genes and  genetic preservation relate to intellectual property involving Mosanto, Du Point and other big players,  regarding our humble rice grain, then you will relish in this link:
http://www.patentlens.net/daisy/RiceGenome/3648.html  






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Good job Cristina!  I agree that butternut should be considered a pumpkin, it's so similar to the other winter (hard skinned) varieties.  One thing I know is, they're all yummy!  Not much time today, we're camping over my MIL FILs place as our place is getting painted!  Thanks for the thank you!  


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Symbi's question..........Haven't seen any pimentos around except ground up in paprika, where did you see those?  Would like to try them and notice they are neutral for all types unlike capsicums..........................................................................

I see them in a big store in Canberra called SupaBarn, but even though i know they are pimentos by the appearance, they are generically labelled capsicum. Years ago I used to see them in a health food store with the same mistaken identification, so just for fun you might consider doing a "food crawl" around all your local fresh food outlets. Once you have found the genuine article you will always know them by appearance. Few people outside our select group will see the need to label them correctly, so we just need to be independent of their mistaken labels.





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Cristina
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Brought over as a result of a question regarding the source of peccorno cheese (sheep, cow) and the distinction between Peccorino and Peccorino Romano.

Quoted from Cristina
Well, I am hoping that Peccorino refers to the way the cheese is made which can be done with either sheep or cow's milk.  At least in Australia (as well as other countries as seen below), Peccorino cheese  is sold without specifying that it is made from sheep.  On checking the websites below, they are actually advertising some as being made from cow's milk.  So I hope this one will be like the Feta cheese that can be made from either goat or cow's milk, but it has the same rating in our lists as Feta.

So, whether from sheep or cow, I hope that 'Peccorino' is rated the same in our food lists.

http://www.lacasa.com.au/qa.htm#8


Websites advertising Peccorino cheese made from cow's milk:
http://www.clover.co.za/content/235/pecorino/
I get access to this one in my local store:
http://www.trueorganic.com.au/products.php?pid=48
and to this fresh one:
http://www.lacasa.com.au/freshpecorino.htm


PS: Regarding your question as to Peccorino and Romano being the same, they are not, they are two different types of cheeses, one is the plain Peccorino which can be fresh or matured and the other one is the Peccorino Romano, which is similar to Parmesan cheese in texture.  




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Further Research on Pimento:

I bought these today at Wollies in Kawana waters.  They were in the fruit and vegie section, in a pack of six, disguised under the name of: Baby Red Capsicums.  

http://www.thekitchn.com/thekitchn/look-pimento-peppers-100956

PS: edited to say, those baby red capcicums, are just that, baby capcicums and not the Pimento we are talking about. So this post, although it has a relevant link to real pimento pictures, it is not relevant from the point of view of buying it at the supermarket.     





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Research on Malanga, Tannier, Xanthosoma
Spanish: Oreja de Elefantes, bituca,
Hojas de Bore (Chequear el pie de esta pagina)

Not in TypeBase, but in our Swami lists

Quote from http://www.plantnames.unimelb.edu.au/Sorting/Xanthosoma.html

Quoted Text
Xanthosoma sagittifolium  (L.) Schott

SYNONYM(S) :   Arum sagittifolium L.,  Caladium sagittifolium (L.) Vent.

CHINESE :  千年芋    Qian nian yu  (Taiwan).

ENGLISH :  Ape (Hawaii), Arrowleaf elephant's ear, Elephant ears (USA), Green arrow elephant ears, New cocoyam,  Tania, Tannia (Caribbean Islands), Yautia.

FRENCH :  Chou cara�be,  Malanga marron, Tanier (Caribbean Islands), Tannier, Tanyove (Guyana), Tayo tyo (West Indies), Taye, Tayove (Guyane).

GERMAN :  Tania.

MALAY :   Kimpool (Indonesia).

PORTUGUESE :  Mangar� mirim, Mangareto, Mangarito, Mangar�s (Brazil), Taioba (Brazil).

SPANISH :  Gualuza (Bolivia), Malanga (Antilles), Malanga amarilla, Malanga blanca (Cuba),  Malanga malangay, Ocumo (Venezuala), Ocumo cuman (Venezuela), Quequesque (Guatemala), Quiquisque, Tiquisque blanco (Costa Rica), Yaut�a amarilla, Yaut�a blanca, Yautia bravi� (Puerto Rico) .

A few nice photos in this link:
Http://toptropicals.com/catalog/uid/xanthosoma_sagittifolium.htm

The Malanga is very similar to the Taro plant, they are both Elephant ear plants, so how do we tell them apart without digging and checking their corns (which are quite different).  The main difference on the outside, is the way the stem connects to the leaf.  In the Malanga the stem meets the leaf at the join of the top of the leaf (the top vertix in the ear). Observe the photos in this link:

http://michaels4gardens.com/Xanthosoma.html

In the Taro, the stem meets the leaf towards the middle of the leaf, not at the top joint.  Check the photos on this link:

http://michaels4gardens.com/Taro.html

This is a previous thread where Malanga was discussed:
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GTDdiet/m-1252585126/

You will find a neat summary of Elephant ear plants across various genera (including Taro and Malanga) in this link where Taro (old Cocoyam) is  in the Colocacia genera and Malanga (new Cocoyam) is in the Xanthosoma genera.
http://www.buzzle.com/articles/elephant-ear-plant.html

These are also good relevant links (when they are working)
http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/malanga
http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/taro!opendocument&startkey=taro

Spanish link:
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthosoma
Spanish article translating Malanga to Hojas de bore:
http://www.lrrd.org/lrrd18/7/rodr18091.htm

Both these plants are toxic when raw, they need to be cooked in salty water for at least 15 minutes. Proceed with caution particularly when first introducing them to your diet.  When treated properly they can be  a very nutritious addition to your diet.  Malanga is a SF in my Swami and Taro is neutral.






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Cristina  -  Sunday, November 22, 2009, 8:06pm
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