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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    The GenoType Diet  ›  what about kids???
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what about kids???  This thread currently has 730 views. Print Print Thread
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annadavies
Wednesday, August 5, 2009, 11:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I am new to this and am trying to find how to work this in my family.  Can we type our children?  Should we check them every so often -- will they change types as they grow?

I know the most benefit comes from living it 24/7 -- which I will do for me -- but if I give my kids a "free" day once a week, will that de-rail the whole thing?  I am looking for compromises with them so they will be more willing to try this.  

I have an 11-yr-old who has struggled with ADHD.  We have him off of medication, and are controlling it with diet, exercise, sleep, etc., but I think this will help tremendously.  

Thanks for the help!
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Ribbit
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 12:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

~W~A~R~R~I~O~R~ Defender, Survivor
Kyosha Nim
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Hey, Anna.  Dr. D recommends the Blood Type Diet rather than the GenoType Diet for still-growing children.  However......I have put my 6-year-old on the Explorer diet and she's done beautifully.

We started my AB daughter on the AB secretor diet when she was about 3.  It helped her tremendously, but it wasn't perfect.  The AB non-secretor diet was better, but she still had unexplained food allergies to "beneficial" foods and she still had migraines and bright red cheeks and eye circles.  My A son has been on the A diet since he started solids, and my B toddler has been on the B diet from the very beginning also.  

With the help of those on the forums here, we made an educated guess as to what my AB's genotype could be based on her known food allergies.  We said, "Well, we know she's allergic to soy, corn, eggs, and peanuts." She was also somewhat dairy-intolerant at the time, couldn't eat honey, and we had her eating gluten-free just because my husband was gluten-free and she seemed to follow a lot of his patterns.  Based on those known allergies, we looked at which type didn't recommend those foods anyway, and we came up with the Explorer diet.  Her red cheeks and eye circles went away and she could tolerate honey and dairy again.  She's still allergic to those other foods, but it doesn't bother me anymore because, if she's really an Explorer, she's not supposed to eat them anyway.

Is she really an Explorer?  Who knows.  But we have nothing to lose by putting her on the diet.  If she ends up being something else, it's okay.  She's doing very well now and we're entirely happy.

As far as giving them a "free day," that can be a little tricky.  My  kids are young enough I can control what they eat.  But they also understand that some foods make them feel rotten. We talk about that.  If we've all eaten something we shouldn't have, and we feel bad the next day, we talk about how we really shouldn't have eaten it, it's not worth feeling like this, and how we should just make something special for just ourselves that we can enjoy next time.  They understand that and agree to it.  There are plenty of sweets you can make which comply with their diets.  I would say that one free day a week might be too much.  Depending on their individual reactions and metabolisms, they might end up feeling awful for two or three whole days after their free day.  That only leaves three or four days a week of actually feeling good, and they might not even get to the point of feeling good if they're eating junk that often.  But again, there are plenty of good foods you can make which should satisfy them.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Andrea AWsec
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 12:25am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Making a cake right now with almond meal flour .

Especially with the ADHD i think a free day might be too much.

Tiny avoids can mean trouble  for some of us.


MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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Katsy
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 12:39am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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My kids don't seem to have any food issues, so I'm not very "strict" with them. Reading this thread (combined with getting back into the school routine) is getting me in the mood to be much more compliant with my kids (as well as myself, and *especially* my husband, who saw results within just a few days of going on the BTD), and see if I can see improvements in them with that. Unfortunately, it's far too easy for me to let them eat whatever my mom has when we go there about once a week, plus we have pot-luck every Sunday at church, and the kids are accustomed to eating a lot of non-BTD foods (hotdogs, mac-n-cheese, desserts, etc.). So, maybe you don't have to turn into a drill sergeant about food (although I'd be more tempted to with something like ADD, allergies, or frequent sickness); but I have to agree in theory with the other comments -- esp. since they have been at this much longer than I have, and noticed much better results when so doing -- that you'll get out of it what you put into it -- you'll see better results and faster the more compliant you are.


A married to an O with two children, A & O

For we wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against ...spiritual wickedness in high places. Eph 6:12
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Ribbit
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 1:17am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The downside of being a drill sergeant about food is that it can cause children to be ultra-paranoid about what they put in their mouths.  Good if they're deathly allergic to shellfish or peanuts.  Bad if it's just a preference.  Also, you always run the risk of them completely rebelling when they get old enough to feed themselves.  "Mom wouldn't let us eat anything!!!" and then eating only junk to try to make up for their "deprivation."


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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annadavies
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 2:22am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Thanks for the comments.  I agree about one day a week probably being too much.  My son is 11 and is just starting to notice when he doesn't feel well.  We are trying to show him the link between the foods he is eating.  For example, we had completely cut out dairy for about 60 days with great results (after already cutting out several other foods).  Then we went to my Mom's house for 2 months and there is a lot of cheese around here.  It has just been "easier" to not fight it, but he doesn't feel as well and we are noticing attitude and attention issues -- noises starting and lots more impulsivity. We are trying to point out the connection of not feeling good after dinner or the next morning after eating something he "shouldn't", but he doesn't like feeling restricted.  We are going to try to find some things he loves that he CAN have and focus on that.

I am a Teacher, my husband is a hunter and if I had to make a guess, I would say my son is a gatherer, but he IS O+, so I guess he could be a hunter (which would make it easier for me).  My daughter is A+, and I am not sure for her, yet.  She doesn't seem to be as bothered by stuff except dairy and we know that....

I guess I should feel lucky that we only have A+'s and O+'s in the house, but our lists are quite different.  I am just starting -- I will get this.

Thanks again for the help.
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Lola
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 2:46am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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you can add the teacher GT to your avatar
here s how
display a message under your blood type shield
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-ref/m-1219018887/#num1


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
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Melissa_J
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 3:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You can test their secretor status pretty easily, if it's available where you are.  That's worth doing especially for your son, if he's a non-secretor then that leaves Explorer an option.  

A quick check of his index finger fingerprints is another indicator, if they don't match, and especially if one is a radial loop, then that points to explorer.  My 3 year old O- has that radial loop, so I'm suspicious he could be an explorer.  Kids can change types up until early twenties, but picking the best guess doesn't do any harm, then remeasure every year or two.  


Type O+ blogger, secretor afterall. Gluten intolerant. With two gluten intolerant sons:  A+ Secretor 10 yo (also fructose intolerant and slightly egg allergic), and  O- 7yo.
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Ribbit
Thursday, August 6, 2009, 1:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Kyosha Nim
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Anna, it's fantastic that he's already picking up on the fact that some foods bother him.  Keeping a food diary, with his comments about how he feels, will help as well.  It's like tangible evidence for him.  If he himself can see the correlation, he will be less likely to give in to temptation.

Only after a good long time on this diet I gave my daughter a choice.  Normally I say, "No, that would make you sick--let's eat this instead."  But I wanted to see how well she understood what was going on.  I said, "I'm going to give you a choice this time.  You know how you will feel tomorrow if you eat that cookie.  But I'm going to allow it.  You decide if it's worth 30 seconds of nice taste in your mouth for 24 hours of feeling yucky tomorrow."  She studied the cookie, studied me, and then said, "It wouldn't be worth it."  She chose fruit instead, and the next day I asked her, "Wow, aren't you glad you feel good today?"  She laughed, nodded, and ran off to play.  Had she eaten the cookie, she would have laid around all day crying.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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