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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Type O nonnie diet on a budget?
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geekchic9
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 2:30pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Hi, everyone!

I am on a tight budget. I was wondering what I could do to cut down on expenses for food while maintaining the Type O non-secretor diet? It seems that most of the foods I have to get are either expensive or only available at health food stores -- fairly inconvenient AND expensive. I recognize that prices vary from country to country and even state to state within the USA, but I was wondering if anyone could offer any suggestions.

Thanks!
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Suzanne
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 2:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Type O 1st/ Hunter 2nd
Columnists and Bloggers
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Location: Texas
Age: 60
You have touched on one of my hot buttons.  In my opinion, if because of your budget you have to choose, it is more important to stick with the food lists than it is to be organic.  I read once about a Type O who could not afford grass fed beef.  She felt compelled to eat only organic, and she made herself sick living on organic crackers.  

Here are two blogs I wrote on the subject.

http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/h/archives/00000078.htm

http://www.dadamo.com/bloggers/h/archives/00000228.htm


Good health to you and your household! And good health to all that is yours!  1 Samuel 25:6
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Don
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 3:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MN
Sam Dan
Posts: 7,189
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Location: North Alabama
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I suspect that you are still trying to transition to the BTD. It took me a year or two to finally get to where I am at with the type O BTD. Unfortunately, back then we didn't have the BTD Forums to help guide me and speed up my understanding process.

What I am getting at is I suspect you are doing what a lot a beginners do and that is to try to find and use a lot of substitute products for the things that you used to eat. More of those types of products are found in HFS and are expensive.

What your goal needs to be is to get to the point where you buy very little in the way of food products and mostly only buy whole foods, meat, eggs, produce, nuts, olive oil, etc. You will save a lot of money not buying food products. In other words, get the junk out of your diet and you food expenses will go down.

Second, shop sales and stock up. For instance, I stock up on lamb roasts when my local grocery store regularly puts them on sale, so I never end up having to buy them at full price. The other part of this that I take advantage of is I have to shop at several stores to find the things I want so I make sure to price shop between the stores too.

A final point, I think as you transition your diet and your health improves you may find that it takes less food to nourish you, which will save you money.


FIFHI; ISTP;
Started BTD 3/2002, with 2 O- secretor teenage sons
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geekchic9
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 3:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Suzanne
You have touched on one of my hot buttons.  In my opinion, if because of your budget you have to choose, it is more important to stick with the food lists than it is to be organic.


I had no idea that this was a hot topic! I don't buy organic anymore unless I want something plain, and there is no other alternative. Unfortunately, I had to buy organic almonds a a grocery store because all of the other almonds had stuff I couldn't eat. I guess I won't be shopping at that store anymore.

I really liked your blog titled "Simple and Inexpensive." It had a lot of great ideas. The other blog I 100% agreed with -- even down to the point where it said that one day I'll have an organic garden.  

Thank you!
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geekchic9
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 3:34pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted from Don
I suspect that you are still trying to transition to the BTD. It took me a year or two to finally get to where I am at with the type O BTD. Unfortunately, back then we didn't have the BTD Forums to help guide me and speed up my understanding process.

What I am getting at is I suspect you are doing what a lot a beginners do and that is to try to find and use a lot of substitute products for the things that you used to eat. More of those types of products are found in HFS and are expensive.


Somewhat. It's true that I am new to this. What I am finding out is that I have to prepare my own food and buy the raw ingredients myself. I'm not used to buying my own food -- due to my money situation, I still live with my parents. I'm also not used to cooking, although I am beginning to like it!

Whole foods and buying on sale will make my frugal family proud. I also appreciate that you mentioned that it took a year or two to get where you are now. It reminds me to be patient about my transition to a healthier lifestyle.
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teri
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 5:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- ISTJ Explorer
Ee Dan
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I am new on the BTD too and, as well, shopping & cooking for two different blood types. Soups loaded with bennies twice a day do the trick for us in keeping the $ down and maximizing BTD benefit. I make a soup base with as many common bennies for O's & B's and then split it off to add the uncommon ones. Does not take a lot of time either. Each of us benefits by a minimum of 5 bennies per meal, plus the beef and venison roasts seem to go a lot further this way. We have a bowl for supper and a bowl for breakfast. Midday meal is usually a salad of some sort with whole fruit for snacking on during the day. Can get a lot of bennies this way, which goes a long way to quelling hunger throughout the day (another money saver).

Also, I would never sacrifice organic for BTD, or vice versa, no matter how tight a budget I was working with. Both are SO important and complement each other. In my experience, one can always find other budget cuts to make that are less important than health.


I'm onto you, 'euphoria'

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teri  -  Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 5:28pm
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gulfcoastguy
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 5:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,393
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Age: 53
Sweet potatos can be pretty cheap, $0.25 per pound at Walmart yesterday. Brown rice and pearl barley are also cheap and at any grocery store as well as beneficial beans and peas. Buying whole roasts, turkeys etc is much cheaper than cheaper than buying processed lunch meats like many people do, just have to divide up the meat and freeze part of it or plan to make soups and casseroles with the left overs. Farmers Markets are good sources for vegetables and many of us do have our own gardens. Canned wild salmon is a favorite of several of our O nonnies and is pretty cheap. I bet if you offer to do the grocery shopping and cooking your parents would gladly toss you the check book. Cooking your self is also much cheaper than eating out or paying for medical bills.
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Peppermint Twist
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 7:17pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer; iNfj; BTD/GTD aficionado; lost 97 lbs
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 11,011
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Location: Florida
Age: 52
The key is to buy whole foods versus overly-packaged processed foods.  Since the O diet is mainly veggies (leafy greens, broccoli, sweet potato, etc.) and fruits (berries, etc.), you can do very well on a budget, but the pain-in-the-patootie part is that, since the diet is also so dang perishable, you have to shop pretty often, or freeze a lot, which is certainly a fine thing to do, too.  As for the meat, even though it is KEY to our health to get that protein, we actually don't need very MUCH of it, because it is so high-quality, so nutrient-dense.  Just an amount of meat equivalent to about the size of your fist is enough for a meal, mixed in with your generous portion of veggies and/or fruits, of course.  Buying organic is ideal but if you really can't afford it, just try to buy the purest, best quality whole foods you can.

I think you will find that eating such a nutrient-dense, whole foods diet, which you cook mostly yourself and can, with careful planning, prepare ahead and freeze or refrigerate for the week, really SAVES money in the long run, or at least doesn't cost any more than one's previous way of eating.  Plus, think of all the medical bills we won't have to pay down the road!



And, you are right to remind yourself to be patient with yourself as you transition to this new way of life.  There is a lot to learn and it isn't immediate.  Just do the best you can and be proud of yourself for all the good changes you are implementing.


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Victoria
Tuesday, November 27, 2007, 8:18pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Nomad 56%
Sun Beh Nim
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Ground meats can also be used to keep the meat budget down;
lamb, beef and buffalo;  All are tasty and versatile.



Normal day, let me be aware of the treasure you are.
Let me not pass you by in quest
of some rare and perfect tomorrow.
~Mary Jean Irion
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Curious
Wednesday, November 28, 2007, 4:08am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh+
Ee Dan
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Location: Australia
You could grow some vegetables and herbs in pots, for example kale, lettuce, parsley, basil.
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