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Cabbage/cauliflower and iodine for O+ Hunters  This thread currently has 1,727 views. Print Print Thread
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BHealthy
Saturday, September 8, 2012, 7:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

43% GT1 Hunter
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I started this thread to share the research I've done on why my SWAMI is classifying cabbage, cauliflower and brussles sprouts as avoids for me when they are generally considered to be nutritional powerhouses with anti-cancer properties.  Other cruciferous veggies like kale and broccoli are classesd as superfoods.  What differentiates them?  I am sharing because I learned a HUGE amount that I wish I had known 20 years ago.

According to this page on the Whole Foods website, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=250, they contain isothiocyanate compounds called glucosinolates that can interfere with the production of thyroid hormone in those individuals "with known dietary deficiency of iodine or selenium or both" especially when combined with the isoflavones in soy.  Both of these compounds, glucosinolates and isoflavones, are called 'goitrogens' because they can cause the development of goiters in some individuals.

According to Dr. D: Type O’s tend to have low levels of thyroid hormone and often exhibit insufficient levels of iodine, a chemical element whose sole purpose is thyroid hormone regulation. This causes many side effects such as weight gain, fluid retention and fatigue. Dr. D’Adamo does not recommend iodine supplements, rather a diet rich in saltwater fish and kelp to help regulate the thyroid gland.

The Whole Foods webpage goes on to say, "With respect to diet, the most common cause of goiter is iodine deficiency from lack of iodine-containing foods. However, other food factors can come into play under certain unique circumstances.  For example, since the mineral selenium is required for certain activities within the thyroid gland, selenium deficiency can combine with borderline iodine deficiency to produce goiter."

For me, this information is especially poignant because, when I switched from table salt to Kosher salt many years ago, my iodine intake dropped.  

Over the summer, I gained 4 pounds for no apparent reason.  Looking back, though, I had increased my consumption of both cabbage and cauliflower and was frequently eating them raw (coleslaw is so good in the summer).  Cooking appears to lower the availability of isothiocyanates but fermenting does NOT which is probably why sauerkraut as also an avoid for me.

I have always had a tendency to retain water which I assumed was due to hormones/cycle.  When I get a migraine, I frequently notice that the gloves I use to wash dishes are very hard to remove presumably because my hands are swollen.  Then, when I take the pill to alleviate the pain (Maxalt) I have to pee every 10 minutes.  

Could increasing my intake of iodine solve both these problems?????

Foods rich in iodine, http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/iodine-foods/, are sea vegetables, Himalayan sea salt, cranberries, organic yogurt, navy beans, organic strawberries, raw dairy products, and potatoes.  

I've been using Himalayan sea salt for about 3 years and raw dairy including yogurt for two.  Kelp and bladderwrack, thankfully and understandably, are superfoods for me as are cranberries and peaches.  Strawberries and dairy are both avoids.  

But, I digress.

Cabbage, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are commonly called goitrogens.  Goitrogens include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnips, millet, spinach, strawberries, peaches, watercress, peanuts, radishes, and soybeans.

If isothiocyanate compounds are the reason cabbage, cauliflower and brussles sprouts are classed as avoids for me, then the others should be as well.  Of the foods listed above, here's how they are rated in my SWAMI (beneficial, neutral, avoid):  

broccoli,
Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower,
kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnips,
millet,
spinach,
strawberries,
peaches, watercress,
peanuts,
radishes,
and soybeans.

Of the 17 items listed only 6 are avoids; the rest are either beneficial or neutral.  So WHAT is it about cabbage, cauliflower and brussles sprouts that makes them so dangerous for me?????  

When I Googled "which blood type should not eat cabbage" I found this EXCELLENT article which, in reviewing the BTD book, answered some of my questions http://www.buzzle.com/articles/o-negative-blood-type-diet.html.  It's written for O- blood types but many of the explanations apply to all Os.

According to Madhura,  "cabbage, brussles sprouts, and cauliflower hinder thyroid hormone" while "kale and broccoli are high in vitamin B needed for efficient metabolism".  I don't know whether this information is in the BTD book because the questionnaire indicated that the GTD would be more suited to me.

So, apparently, the vitamins in kale and broccoli trump the goitrogens for me.

But, on this website, http://www.healthalternatives2000.com/vegetables-nutrition-chart.html#Broccoli, brussles sprouts are higher in B vitamins than both broccoli and kale.  So what gives?

IF glucosinolates are the reason for the avoid rating -- I have not had confirmation from Dr D -- then 1) why can't the TYPEbase say "goitrogens inhibit thyroid hormone" instead of "known disease modifier" and 2) why not give me the option of increasing my iodine consumption; or, better yet, being tested to see if I need to?  

The Whole Foods website, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=250, goes on to say that, "For the vast majority of individuals, foods containing potentially goitrogenic substances pose no documented health risk to the thyroid and can be included on a daily basis in a balanced diet. For individuals with known dietary deficiency of iodine or selenium or both, especially when combined with previously diagnosed thyroid problems, intake of soy foods and cruciferous vegetables may need to be discussed with a healthcare practitioner."

I have made an appointment with my doctor to have my thyroid evaluated.  If necessary, I will add kelp and bladderwrack to my diet.

Livestrong, http://www.livestrong.com/article/388860-is-kelp-a-good-source-of-iodine/, cautions that too much iodine can be toxic.  They also warn that "kelp naturally contains organic arsenic and may cause arsenic poisoning when exceeding the recommended amount. Researchers evaluated nine different kelp products and found that eight contained unacceptable levels."

Maine Coast Sea Vegetables makes a granulated kelp flavored with either cayenne or garlic that can be sprinkled on soups or salads.  They state that "Our Kelp for granules is sustainably harvested and certified organic by QAI. We also voluntarily test for heavy metals, herbicides, pesticides, PCB's, fuel oil, and microbiological contaminants." They also sell bladderwrack powder that can be added to juice or smoothie.  

I prefer not to use a capsule because I'm trying to decrease the amount of capsule material, fillers, binders and flow regulators I'm consuming.

Regarding selenium:

This Whole Foods article, http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?dbid=95&tname=nutrient, indicates that "Brazil nuts are one of the most concentrated food sources of selenium, featuring about 70-90 micrograms per nut", but they are avoids for me.  I suspect it is a mold problem (they frequently taste moldy to me) but I will start a new thread for them.

Other food sources of selenium are button mushrooms, cod, shrimp, tuna, halibut, salmon, and mustard seeds.  All but the mushrooms are either superfoods or neutral for me.


RECAP of what I learned:

Type Os tend to have low levels of thyroid hormone and iodine

Cruciferous vegetables can exacerbate this problem for them

Selenium is used by the thyroid and low levels can also exacerbate the problem

Underactive thyroid can cause bloating and fatigue (I knew about the weight gain)

Sea vegetables (kelp, bladderwrack, et al) are high in iodine

Iodine supplementation can cause toxicity

Kelp supplements can contain arsenic


Bottom line for me:

I will eliminate the avoids until I have had my thyroid tested.


"Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical, and expecting more than others think is possible."
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Tom Martens
Saturday, September 8, 2012, 8:00pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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keep it simple:  

Cabbage blocks iodine from the thyroid- not good

Wheat lectin binds to thyroid causing white blood cells to attack- not good


You can't exactly mix information from Dr. Dadamo with other "approaches"

Yes, supplements like Fucus Plus and Sea vegetables (kelp, bladderwrack, et al) are high in iodine.


Be who you are.  Those who mind don't matter, those who matter won't mind.

FIfHI

M,M LeA+ LeB-

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Lloyd
Saturday, September 8, 2012, 8:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from BHealthy

IF glucosinolates are the reason for the avoid rating -- I have not had confirmation from Dr D -- then 1) why can't the TYPEbase say "goitrogens inhibit thyroid hormone" instead of "known disease modifier" and 2) why not give me the option of increasing my iodine consumption; or, better yet, being tested to see if I need to?  


First of all, congratulations on doing your own research. Depth of understanding and learning are wonderful things.

"known disease modifier" is a generic descriptor that is used for anything in the general class, whether thyroid, cancer, or anything else. It provides some guidance without having a zillion footnotes, errata, and of considerable importance it also protects the intellectual property that is the diet.

Since individuals will have different needs and the diet cannot be prescriptive, it is left to the individual to determine their own needs. The generic tendancies of each group are well noted. It is the responsibility of the individual to make application.

Again, for many reasons including legal, a published diet cannot be prescriptive.

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Lola
Saturday, September 8, 2012, 8:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sa Bon Nim
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a swami pro run by a practitioner will personalize your plan and also give you a facts sheet, according to your needs when answering a questionnaire

why not make it to Dr D s U Bridgeport shift??
Planning ahead is key


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BHealthy
Saturday, September 8, 2012, 8:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

43% GT1 Hunter
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Quoted from Lola
a swami pro run by a practitioner will personalize your plan and also give you a facts sheet, according to your needs when answering a questionnaire

why not make it to Dr D s U Bridgeport shift??
Planning ahead is key

Once I know my secretor status, I will go back to the pro and ask her for this fact sheet.

If Dr. D had an office in Illinos, I'd be there in a heartbeat.



"Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical, and expecting more than others think is possible."
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BHealthy
Tuesday, September 11, 2012, 2:45am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

43% GT1 Hunter
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I found this while browsing the LR4YT book on Amazon prior to buying it.  Either that or it was in Dr D's blogs and science writings which I have been perusing most of the day:

"The brassica family - cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower and mustard greens- can affect thyroid function, which is already somewhat deficient in Type O's. Leafy green vegetables rich in Vitamin K, like kale, collard greens, romaine lettuce, BROCCOLI and spinach are very good for Type O's. Vitamin K helps blood clot, and Type O's lack several clotting factors."


So, apparently, the avoid status for cabbage, brussels sprouts and cauliflower IS due to the goitrogens.

And the reason the others are superfoods is due to their vitamin K, not their vitamin B.




"Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical, and expecting more than others think is possible."
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